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Old 2013-03-10, 10:05   Link #181
RRW
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Old 2013-03-10, 10:07   Link #182
Kirarakim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totoum View Post
Well here's a video of the new york Q&A
I didn't listen to the whole interview but that must be the second one (there were two Q/A sessions last night).

It was some of the same questions but in a different order and there were some questions I didn't remember in the above video.

Although we also got the announcement that Hosoda was a new dad in ours, he looked so proud.

He also told us that Beauty and the Beast was one of his favorites from the US.

Anyways what struck out to me about the Q/A session was how enthused the kids were. I know some people like to say "anime is not for kids" but heck I am happy to see so many children in the audience. I want the anime fandom to grow and it's great that they are enjoying something with a bit more depth than some of the other anime shown on TV for kids. Maybe I am being greedy, but I want children (and parents) to be exposed to "good anime" like this. I think Hosoda really deserves the same recognition as Miyazaki in the US.

And he was also nice enough to sign autographs and draw something for everyone. Ended up getting my Tokikake DVD signed (which I brought with me just in case) because I was afraid the poster they were giving out would bend on my trip home.

Hosoda is going to appear at MIT for another screening so if you are nearby don't miss it.

Spoiler for Image:


On another note I really want this now

http://myfigurecollection.net/item/118180
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Old 2013-03-13, 05:06   Link #183
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Aside from the somewhat brisk ending, I'm not sure where to start on this. Is it the soundtrack? or Directing? Or just the fact that each and every one of the characters became a delight? I mean, a lot of people say that characters take time to develop, but this movie did it fine in just 2 hours. All the named characters had something to offer besides their initial impression.

There's definitely a feeling that there some bonds where people will do anything for the other. Sometimes it doesn't always turn out the way you want, and some might see that as a failure. But the more important part is that you actually do something and Hana really did give all she could get to handle her rather extraordinary circumstances and to do it all alone as well. And her children will have to face it as well but they will succeed as well. A good movie about good people, basically.

As with the other Hisoda work I've seen, the events are presented matter of fact without any false pretense or emotional manipulation. It's very fluid and the audience I feel can react very naturally to this kind of thing, coming up with their own interpretations and feelings.
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Old 2013-03-13, 10:55   Link #184
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Originally Posted by Archon_Wing View Post
As with the other Hisoda work I've seen, the events are presented matter of fact without any false pretense or emotional manipulation.
That's the interesting thing: those who didn't like the movie generally felt that it was contrived and emotionally manipulative.

A couple of examples:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rahan View Post
I didn't like the concept of moe-werewolves (putting them at the same level as "sparkling vampires") but the visuals are stunning. Seeing it on a big screen truly reminded me how much I prefer cartoons / animes over over newer style of animations.

Both kids are rather annoying and their story was kinda cliché and predictable (bar a little twist that doesn't change much really), fortunately, it's less the story of Ame and Yuki than the story of the struggle of their mother although I assume kids would disagree.

Overall, It felt like a good tale for kids, but it lacked substance compared to Hosada's previous works. It's the good old story of how one must find its own path and where he belongs we all have seen many times and nothing more. It's rather funny (kids laughed a lot), but there is absolutely no originality in how it is presented.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Schilling

Little Ame (Amon Kabe) reluctantly follows his sister’s lead, but he is interested less in school than the wilds beyond the classroom window. Finally, on the brink of adolescence, a more confident and rebellious Ame (Yukito Nishi) encounters a fellow wolf who instructs him in the ways of his kind.

These two coming-of-age stories may each captivate one sex while boring the other. It's as if Hosoda were appealing to Jane Eyre fans in one scene, Call of the Wild fans in the next.

As a repeat reader of both classic novels, I didn't mind the switches in gender focus so much as the well-worn, stereotypical rails on which the stories ran. They may be true to real life here, in which children of international (if not inter-species) unions are so often encouraged to choose one heritage over the other, but next time out, I hope Hosoda mixes it up more — and tells producers intent on making him the next "all quadrants" hit-maker to take a hike.

THE JAPAN TIMES
Both of them make a good point. The drama is a bit on the "safe" and predictable side: Selfless mother who sacrifices everything for her children's sake; scary neighbours who turn out to be really good guys once you get to know them; one parent who dies tragically for even more melodrama.

It's noticeable that Hosoda generally eschews social commentary in his projects. True, he draws inspiration from the world around him — every artist does — but he never actually goes so far as to make overt political statements through his work (this is the chief reason I found the New York query on "free love" somewhat objectionable; Okami Kodomo isn't about sexual identity, so why shoehorn a sensitive question into such a genial tale?)

In contrast, Hayao Miyazaki's political positions are very clearly known. He's a staunch socialist (indeed, he calls himself a communist), as can be seen via Porco Rosso. He also has very strong views about the environment (Nausicaa, Mononoke Hime). Miyazaki is also strongly conservative when it comes to preserving certain traditions, from hand-drawn animation to the Japanese sense of community.

To me, it's clear that Hosoda, at this point, doesn't really aspire to be much more than a maker of blockbuster movies. Yes, it's unreasonable to expect otherwise — artists create whatever they enjoy, and if Hosoda isn't interested in making BIG PHILOSOPHICAL STATEMENTS, then he simply isn't.

But it's also true that, historically, the most influential artists are generally the ones who do. Hosoda, for now, just isn't the kind of artist some critics want him to be. But he has the potential to be a really, really good one. He sees. And he understands. That's rare among many creators.

Last edited by TinyRedLeaf; 2013-03-13 at 11:10.
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Old 2013-03-13, 12:42   Link #185
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I disagree that a strong filmmaker has to have a strong social message. As much as I love Miyazaki, sometimes his "messages" ruin his films for me.

Also looking at the most admired filmmakers most of them
did not push social commentary in their films.

I also disagree that we can just say Hosoda is going for a blockbuster. His films are quiet & reflective. Yes they are not necessarily about the larger world but about our smaller individual worlds.

Obviously this film was about the sacrifices of mothers but that is shown strongest in the final scenes. You do everything for your children but they eventually leave you. Just like Hosoda showed Ame & Yuki finding their own path, I think he also showed the mixture of sadness & pride of being a parent when your kids leave you.
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Old 2013-03-13, 17:06   Link #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirarakim View Post
I also disagree that we can just say Hosoda is going for a blockbuster. His films are quiet & reflective..
I agree,just going by another recent interview:

Quote:
Q: Other than The Girl Who Leapt through Time, are there are other properties that you would like to adapt?

Mamoru Hosoda: I do come across some materials that are interesting, and I think that would be good for film—something like No Longer Human would be very good material to adapt! But someone has already done that one.
No Longer Human is hardly blockbuster material

Of course he didn't do it but it does show he has an interest in this kind of story.
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Old 2013-03-13, 17:33   Link #187
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omfg. I can't express how awesome the cast is. fadsfdsfsadfasdfd. Fanboy explosion. I WILL love this movie.
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Old 2013-03-13, 21:03   Link #188
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Originally Posted by Kirarakim View Post
I also disagree that we can just say Hosoda is going for a blockbuster. His films are quiet & reflective. Yes they are not necessarily about the larger world but about our smaller individual worlds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by totoum View Post
No Longer Human is hardly blockbuster material.

Of course he didn't do it but it does show he has an interest in this kind of story.
Well, "blockbuster" probably isn't the best word I could use. I was thinking more along the lines of "feel-good", and Hosoda's three movies to date are generally "feel-good" productions that don't really try to shake things up. They don't make viewers sit up and think a bit more about the movie's meaning in a larger context, nor do they challenge prevailing worldviews.

That isn't meant to be criticism of Hosoda, by the way. I agree that his strengths lie in conveying the personal worlds of his characters, and he does this extremely well.

But I disagree about admired film-makers not pushing social commentary. Akira Kurosawa, arguably the most respected of all Japanese film-makers, was admired not just because of his artistic vision, but also because of the socio-political views he espoused in movies like Ikiru and Rashomon. Even his crowd-pleasing movies like Seven Samurai and Ran contain elements of political commentary just beneath the surface.

Then there are Chinese film-makers like Zhang Yimou, who is highly respected not just for his ability to produce gorgeous works of art, but also because of his adept use of film as a canvas for political satire.

Looking at Hollywood, a brilliant film-maker like Steven Spielberg was regarded mainly as just a commercial genius, until he made a movie like Schindler's List. It was the project that made people sit up and look at Spielberg in a different light.

Okami Kodomo could have taken a more critical view of society, had Hosoda been inclined to make that kind of story. It could have been a perfect vehicle to explore Japanese views on multi-ethnicity, on the acceptance of foreigners and their ways of life. It also could have, like the Ghibli movie Only Yesterday, taken a deeper, more realistic assessment on the feasibility of rural life in modern Japan. But Hosoda chose not to.

Of course, I'm not at all saying that he has to. I strongly believe that he's doing just fine the way he is. Why, after all, should he bend over to meet the expectations of a handful of critics? All he needs to do is to be fully honest with his own artistic vision and to be steadfast to his own beliefs.

That said, I wouldn't mind either if he pushes himself just that little bit more, to make something really thought-provoking. It's one thing to say that one's interested in making something like No Longer Human, and quite another to actually make a successful project based on it. If I could write even a fraction of all the grandiose stories swirling in my head, I would be swimming in lucrative royalties by now. I'm nowhere near as gifted as Hosoda, so that's why, like some critics, I really hope he can go even further with his talent.
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Old 2013-03-13, 21:24   Link #189
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Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
Well, "blockbuster" probably isn't the best word I could use. I was thinking more along the lines of "feel-good", and Hosoda's three movies to date are generally "feel-good" productions that don't really try to shake things up. They don't make viewers sit up and think a bit more about the movie's meaning in a larger context, nor do they challenge prevailing worldviews.
He has only made 3 films so far (not counting ones made as part of a franchise). I think that is hardly a large enough sample.

And I wouldn't actually call Wolf Children, "feel good" personally the ending was more bitter sweet than anything. I would say the film did make me think about what it means to be parent. Again it might be something more internal but that doesn't mean there was no substance to the film.

Certainly Hosoda didn't have a sociopolitical message in his film (and he still might in the future) but that doesn't mean he isn't as strong as other filmmakers.

As for filmmakers who mainly made films for entertainment purposes well look no further than Alfred Hitchcock. He might have made a few more serious films (most notably Vertigo) but even he would tell you he wanted to entertain and to thrill. And today he is considered one of the best filmmakers (probably more revered today than even in his own time).

That is just one example but I don't want to go too off topic talking about other directors.
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Old 2013-03-13, 21:30   Link #190
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I certainly don't consider Ookami Kodomo a feel-good film. I think it's quite an emotionally challenging one, in fact, and the mixed response to the ending certainly reflects that.
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Old 2013-03-14, 00:07   Link #191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
In contrast, Hayao Miyazaki's political positions are very clearly known. He's a staunch socialist (indeed, he calls himself a communist), as can be seen via Porco Rosso. He also has very strong views about the environment (Nausicaa, Mononoke Hime). Miyazaki is also strongly conservative when it comes to preserving certain traditions, from hand-drawn animation to the Japanese sense of community.

To me, it's clear that Hosoda, at this point, doesn't really aspire to be much more than a maker of blockbuster movies. Yes, it's unreasonable to expect otherwise — artists create whatever they enjoy, and if Hosoda isn't interested in making BIG PHILOSOPHICAL STATEMENTS, then he simply isn't.
I like Miyazaki too, but sometimes he will cram it down my throat in a not so subtle fashion. The question is that is it really needed to touch upon social commentary or the human condition to really serve as a meaningful experience? I mean something like 5 cm per second isn't gonna provide that, but at the same time it still gives a strong feeling of what it is to be human. In the case of this movie, being human in a very unusual situation and how it implies. And since most of us are indeed humans, relating and forming a connection becomes extremely natural.
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Old 2013-03-14, 04:21   Link #192
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I like Miyazaki too, but sometimes he will cram it down my throat in a not so subtle fashion.
It really depends on which of his movies we're talking about. But that's another discussion for another thread at another time.

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The question is that is it really needed to touch upon social commentary or the human condition to really serve as a meaningful experience?
Frankly? No, there's no need at all. As I've said, what I personally look for is a sincere, heartfelt story that is told as simply as possible. (That's speaking generally, of course. My tastes and expectations vary wildly. I don't expect the same things from a Hosoda movie as I would from a Satoshi Kon or Kenji Kamiyama production, for example.)

I brought attention to some of the criticisms that some people have of Okami Kodomo to generate discussion. It's interesting to me that the emotional highlights of the movie resonated differently for different people, and I wanted to explore and understand the different points of view. That's what critique is all about, the respectful consideration of all perspectives.

Or, you could say that it's just me. I like playing devil's advocate. In any case, I'm always willing to agree to disagree.
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Old 2013-03-18, 13:48   Link #193
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Well maybe this is the reason why it took so long for funimation to get the license , from this review/article

Quote:
One last thing: before the screening I got to meet with Hosada, and one of the reps from the film’s international distribution agency was also in the room. She had mentioned that — in regards to licensing Wolf Children for the States — they had contacted everyone from Warner Bros. to Paramount to see if anyone was interested in distributing it across the country. Not a single one of those studios returned their call.
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Old 2013-03-18, 21:19   Link #194
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Well maybe this is the reason why it took so long for funimation to get the license , from this review/article
Well, that's certainly depressing.
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Old 2013-03-19, 12:11   Link #195
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Well anime has always been kind of hit and miss in the United States so it's no surprise the big name studios didn't really want to deal with a theatrical release unless profit was guaranteed. Oh well their loss...
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Old 2013-03-19, 21:57   Link #196
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And in happy news the movie won one of the NY Children's Int'l Film Fest audience awards

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news...dren-film-fest
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Old 2013-12-26, 21:28   Link #197
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I recently had a chance to view the film. I wasn't going to comment, but I noticed TinyRedLeaf was coming off as a bit of a "lone wolf" () with his opinions on Hosoda's artistic intentions so I thought I'd throw in some support. I generally agree with his take on Hosoda as well as the film itself. I certainly enjoyed the film, and found it heartwarming and moving, particularly when I projected my own memories onto it.

With that being said, I do personally think the film treads proven ground with regards to its sentimental aspects and I agree with TinyRedLeaf that it may be indicative of what Hosoda's artistic goals at this point in his career are.

I think there are a lot of possibilities in the subject matter of this film which are explored by Hosoda, but only at an arm's length. The alienation of siblings as they find themselves identifying with different parts of their heritage. The confused feelings a single mother may have to her former lover who has- yes, tragically, but abruptly - left her to deal with problems she cannot handle. The feelings of a mother who cannot understand the path her son has taken. These are touched by Hosoda in the film, but I can't help but feel that there is something more powerful to these ideas which was not expressed in the film, and that this is intentionally done by Hosoda because his goals are more grounded and practical. That is not inherently a bad thing.

With regards to the ending, while it is certainly intended to be bittersweet, I am not sure I would call it emotionally challenging. I certainly feel it could have been, particularly the scene where Hana meets her lover again in her dreams, after all those years, after all her experiences as a mother, and being swept up in her current emotional turmoil over Ame. But I didn't quite feel it was there for me.

All of this is, of course subjective, and I can clearly see that many viewers did feel that this passion is already there. But, for what it's worth, that's how I feel.
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Old 2014-01-17, 02:10   Link #198
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I just watched this movie on Wednesday and enjoyed the journey quite a bit.
But I have a question regarding Hana's husband's scene...
Spoiler:

This just seems wrong. It's still your animal; therefore your property! I would much appreciate it if someone could explain this.
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Old 2014-01-17, 04:43   Link #199
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Spoiler for wolf children:
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Old 2014-01-17, 15:19   Link #200
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I would have just lied and said he was my "dog"....
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