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Old 2012-08-08, 05:43   Link #401
synaesthetic
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Fortunately I live in the SF bay area so access to Korean ingredients isn't a real problem. I can buy hot pepper paste and hot pepper flakes at a little Korean grocer in Oakland or the 99 Ranch in Richmond... and kimchi can literally be bought almost anywhere around here, even from ordinary supermarkets.

It's more fun to make your own, though.
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Old 2012-08-08, 16:06   Link #402
Urzu 7
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I'd like to try kimchi made with cabbage. My understanding is that it can be made with different vegetables, though.
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Old 2012-08-08, 16:34   Link #403
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Napa cabbage is the most common because it can last longer than radish kimchi or scallion kimchi.
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Old 2012-08-11, 03:48   Link #404
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Just seen in the net... How to make a Heart Shaped Egg...

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Old 2012-08-11, 19:53   Link #405
jdennis007
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I made my own version of "dirty" rice, took one package rice and beans mix and added one pound browned lean ground beef and cooked to package direction for the rice.
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Old 2012-08-11, 21:02   Link #406
Urzu 7
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Originally Posted by jdennis007 View Post
I made my own version of "dirty" rice, took one package rice and beans mix and added one pound browned lean ground beef and cooked to package direction for the rice.
The only rice and beans I've ever had is from a box or pouch. I'd love to have some of that stuff made from scratch, like from someone from New Orleans or maybe someone Cuban from down in Miami.
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Old 2012-08-11, 23:10   Link #407
synaesthetic
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All you really need to do is figure out what's in red beans and rice and you can make it yourself. It's dead simple.
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Old 2012-08-11, 23:44   Link #408
Urzu 7
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All you really need to do is figure out what's in red beans and rice and you can make it yourself. It's dead simple.
Yeah, I thought of that after I made my post.

I could try it with red beans and try it with black beans.
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Old 2012-08-12, 21:49   Link #409
Urzu 7
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What is the proper term for restaurants that serve a lot of western classics? They offer up your steak and potatoes, seasonal vegetables, poultry and fish, and perhaps some western classics like chicken pot pie, roasted chicken, roast prime rib, and beef pot roast. They offer a lot of standard fare for western cuisine (western world) and American fare.

I hope that makes sense. Does anyone know what type of restaurants I'm talking about? Here is an example of a restaurant such as this (a menu): http://www.thecman.com/restaurants/c...land/menu.aspx
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Old 2012-08-13, 17:28   Link #410
DonQuigleone
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Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
What is the proper term for restaurants that serve a lot of western classics? They offer up your steak and potatoes, seasonal vegetables, poultry and fish, and perhaps some western classics like chicken pot pie, roasted chicken, roast prime rib, and beef pot roast. They offer a lot of standard fare for western cuisine (western world) and American fare.

I hope that makes sense. Does anyone know what type of restaurants I'm talking about? Here is an example of a restaurant such as this (a menu): http://www.thecman.com/restaurants/c...land/menu.aspx
For Britain and Ireland you'd be able to get all that kind of stuff at a good Pub or Tavern.

Can't say what such a restaurant would be called elsewhere.

I don't think you get many "pure" restaurants serving traditional British Food in the Anglosphere as British Cuisine primarily consists of home cooking, and does not really have a "haute cuisine" the way France or Italy do, you don't go to restaurants to get what you eat at home every day. British Cuisine also has a (unjustifiably) bad reputation.

So the best to find it is a Tavern or maybe Pub, which was the traditional British venue for food to be served (restaurants being a French import). These days a lot of Pubs and Taverns serve very good food.
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Old 2012-08-13, 18:05   Link #411
jdennis007
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Most of the food you mentioned can be found at casual style restaurants, ie TGIFridays, Applebees etc...
I am lucky we have different restaurant types from all over the world, including English and Irish.
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Old 2012-08-13, 18:17   Link #412
Urzu 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
I don't think you get many "pure" restaurants serving traditional British Food in the Anglosphere as British Cuisine primarily consists of home cooking, and does not really have a "haute cuisine" the way France or Italy do, you don't go to restaurants to get what you eat at home every day. British Cuisine also has a (unjustifiably) bad reputation.
I haven't been to the UK, but it seems like there is some really good British food found in good quality restaurants over there. I would agree, Britain shouldn't have such a bad reputation for food. Maybe it wasn't known for good food many years ago, but the Britain of today I'm sure offers a lot of good eats.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jdennis007 View Post
Most of the food you mentioned can be found at casual style restaurants, ie TGIFridays, Applebees etc...
I am lucky we have different restaurant types from all over the world, including English and Irish.
TGIFridays and Applebees are their own type of thing. I can see how you draw similarities, though. But TGIF and Applebees will take American staples and throw in foods from exotic cultures where they see fit. I think those restaurants fall under labels such as "Ameican" and "Bar and Grill".
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Old 2012-08-13, 19:39   Link #413
DonQuigleone
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TGIFridays is not what he's looking for. You wouldn't be able to get a Shepherds Pie or Cumberland sausage at a TGIFridays. What he was describing sounded to me like traditional British Cuisine.

I think one big reason British Cuisine got a bad reputation was that the limitations of war time rationing (which actually continued for quite a while after the war ended), meant that British food was not particularly appetizing for a good 10 year period, and it didn't get better when the modern vogue for fast food and takeaways hit Britain.

It's certainly improved of late.

As for Ireland, Irish food was never that good to begin with, Soda Bread excepted.
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Old 2012-08-13, 20:03   Link #414
Urzu 7
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Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
TGIFridays is not what he's looking for. You wouldn't be able to get a Shepherds Pie or Cumberland sausage at a TGIFridays. What he was describing sounded to me like traditional British Cuisine.

I think one big reason British Cuisine got a bad reputation was that the limitations of war time rationing (which actually continued for quite a while after the war ended), meant that British food was not particularly appetizing for a good 10 year period, and it didn't get better when the modern vogue for fast food and takeaways hit Britain.

It's certainly improved of late.

As for Ireland, Irish food was never that good to begin with, Soda Bread excepted.
The menu I showed is from one restaurant in a chain in my state. It is a small chain, not a corporate chain, and it branches out to include other restaurants in the area. In my state and upper New England in general, there is a decent amount of independently owned restaurants that offer up western classics and traditional New England food.

That menu I showed is of a restaurant that offers mostly traditional New England cuisine. What I'm assuming is that traditional New England food borrows a lot from British food. Traditional cuisine from New England and New York is probably called 'yankee fare' by some, I'm guessing.
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Old 2012-08-14, 05:47   Link #415
DonQuigleone
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Originally Posted by Urzu 7 View Post
That menu I showed is of a restaurant that offers mostly traditional New England cuisine. What I'm assuming is that traditional New England food borrows a lot from British food. Traditional cuisine from New England and New York is probably called 'yankee fare' by some, I'm guessing.
Given that the United States(and particularly New England) is a colony of England, this shouldn't be too surprising. Southern "traditional" food is also similiar, in it's own way, to British food.

There are certain American staples that have nothing to do with Britain though, namely hamburgers, hotdogs, pizza... As all these things originate from other countries.

The biggest difference I can see is that the US doesn't have as many pies, and varieties of (British) sausage.
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Old 2012-08-14, 18:59   Link #416
Urzu 7
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Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
Given that the United States(and particularly New England) is a colony of England, this shouldn't be too surprising. Southern "traditional" food is also similiar, in it's own way, to British food.

There are certain American staples that have nothing to do with Britain though, namely hamburgers, hotdogs, pizza... As all these things originate from other countries.

The biggest difference I can see is that the US doesn't have as many pies, and varieties of (British) sausage.
To get bangers, I'd have to find them in a shop that is a specialty shop or from a butcher that just happens to make them, or get them online. The easiest way to get bangers or Irish sausages is via Amazon or other online vendors. Likewise, I'd like to make cassolette sometime (a French dish) and if I decide to make it with a certain type of duck sausage, Amazon.com will save the day on that one. Hardly any brick and mortar retail store in the U.S. would sell the duck sausage I'd be looking for.
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Last edited by Urzu 7; 2012-08-14 at 20:42.
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Old 2012-08-14, 19:19   Link #417
DonQuigleone
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It is difficult to find certain things in the US alright.

I remember the selection of cheeses on offer at supermarkets was pretty poor. In fact, a large proportion was "generic" cheese, which is an unheard of idea in Europe. As for Cheese in a can, well, that's just disgusting...

In Ireland, I find the biggest problem is getting quality sausages (particularly German style sausages). All our sausages are overly salty.
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Old 2012-08-14, 20:50   Link #418
Urzu 7
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Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
It is difficult to find certain things in the US alright.

I remember the selection of cheeses on offer at supermarkets was pretty poor. In fact, a large proportion was "generic" cheese, which is an unheard of idea in Europe. As for Cheese in a can, well, that's just disgusting...

In Ireland, I find the biggest problem is getting quality sausages (particularly German style sausages). All our sausages are overly salty.
There was this one restaurant in my state that I really miss. Ate there three times soon after moving to this state, and then it closed down. The owner had enough of the business. New owners took the property. Totally different cooks and menus. Totally different restaurant, and not a very good one.

This restaurant, when it was open, had some good quality food. They made a lot of things from scratch. They would make bangers from scratch. I've never had any in the UK (never been to Europe), but I thought these sausages were great. The right amount of lard; lots of flavor and moisture. Not too salty. They made their own bratwurst and one night a week they would have a night where they would sell some German meals. I ate there at one of those nights and had their bratwurst they made in-house and it was also delicious. They were served with potato pancakes and red cabbage; I think it was pickled. I had other good food at that place. I might have gone there four times, now I'm not quite sure. I'm still kind of bummed it closed down. It was only a 30 minute drive away.
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Old 2012-08-15, 07:53   Link #419
jdennis007
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I can find almost any ingredient here, the issue is cost.
I can even find Haggis.
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Old 2012-08-15, 09:27   Link #420
Urzu 7
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You must be from NYC if you have great availability of many different foods.
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