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Old 2013-08-28, 02:51   Link #30321
Traece
:cool:
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Idaho
Age: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Because despite your expectations, such information are known by quite a few people once uploaded into the network. In a world where your Health Card is enough to find everything connected to you including your credit card number, you think the government or any interested party would not be able to find things about you which you think should be private?
I'll take a moment to address some more technical aspects of information and privacy.

To a degree you are correct. It's not hard to link together information as you've said using something particularly telling. There are, however, limitations to what information you can find on a person without knowing what you're looking for. Having a person's name doesn't mean the government can find everything they've ever done on the internet. A name means nothing, because there are many like it. A social security number means much more. A name and a date of birth will give you the most access. It's the one completely common requirement for signing up for any website.

If you lie about your name, or you lie about your date of birth, how do they find what you've done? If they track your movements, sure. Stuff that's in the past, especially if it's been masked with deletions and various other methods of secrecy, isn't going to be something they can find with the press of the button or a nice hard scrubbing. How do you find something if you don't know you're looking for it?

Is it overbearing that they could do such things? Without a doubt. Perhaps I'm disillusioned that I think they don't care about what I post on AnimeSuki, or Reddit. I suspect the same is true for the vast majority of people. Mountains of irrelevant information with no bearing on legitimate (or illegitimate) investigations. Should they be able to look at what they please and how they please whilst viewing me as a potential threat to society or some such thing? I can't rightly blame them for doing so.

The true issue tends to be more about the 'why' than the 'what'. After all, when they're running around proclaiming traitors and security threats as they please and investing in discovering every little bit of information that can be gleaned, it's hardly appropriate. The time and place isn't whoever and whenever.
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Old 2013-08-28, 03:29   Link #30322
Jinto
Asuki-tan Kairin ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Fürth (GER)
Age: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeijiSensei View Post
Syrian Electronic Army Hijacks New York Times Website

I wondered what was wrong with the Times site earlier today; now we know the reason.

I'm not sure I believe Westin's comment about the risks posed to NY Times readers from this event. This was an attack against the Domain Name System, so that nytimes.com was redirected to the SEA site in Russia. That's a lot different from breaking into the site and grabbing its database. I suppose someone who tried to subscribe might have handed over credit card information to the Syrians, but I don't think it affected even someone like me who posts fairly regularly in the Comments sections.

Comments still seem to be offline though the site is back up. I am a bit disturbed that the IP address I get for www.nytimes.com, 170.149.172.130, does not have "reverse" resolution set up. Asking for the host name associated with that address brings up a "not found" result. I never checked to see whether the Times had correct forward and reverse resolution configured before the hack, so perhaps they have just never bothered. That's pretty poor Internet engineering on their part if true.

I guess we were "at risk," to use Westin's term, of reading bogus material instead of the legitimate content, but I'd bet the English compositional skills of these guys don't measure up to the level of NYT reporters.
In e.g. online banking they would use certificates to allow the user to better detect a phishing attack. I do not know how costly these certificates are, but maybe news sites could use it too. Then again... besides the publicity such targets are pretty useless.

If you want to see what shit is really going on in the world, take a plc connect it to the internet and let it mimick some component of a water plant or power plant. I promise you, you do not have to wait long for the first attack (matter of a week or less).
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Old 2013-08-28, 04:32   Link #30323
ganbaru
books-eater youkai
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Betweem wisdom and insanity
Indian rupee hurtles lower as foreign investors flee
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...97R06K20130828

Analysis: China has much at risk but no reach in Middle East
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...97R08V20130828
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Old 2013-08-28, 04:41   Link #30324
SaintessHeart
NYAAAAHAAANNNNN~
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto View Post
If you want to see what shit is really going on in the world, take a plc connect it to the internet and let it mimick some component of a water plant or power plant. I promise you, you do not have to wait long for the first attack (matter of a week or less).
Who the heck in their right mind would take a controller and plug it into the Internet?!?!?
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Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-08-28, 04:55   Link #30325
Seitsuki
Onee!
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Auckland, NZ
This is humanity we're talking about after all. I'm fairly certain you wouldn't have to search very hard.
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Old 2013-08-28, 04:56   Link #30326
MeoTwister5
Komrades of Kitamura Kou
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Where I can learn to be lonely.
Age: 29
Are you saying that by plugging my controller I can control teh internetz?
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Old 2013-08-28, 05:04   Link #30327
Cosmic Eagle
卍曼荼羅・無量大数
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: 大欲界天狗道
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Who the heck in their right mind would take a controller and plug it into the Internet?!?!?
Next we have people plugging their brain into the net
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Old 2013-08-28, 05:33   Link #30328
C.A.
Absolute Haruhist!
*Artist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Age: 27
Dr Kevin Warwick the world's first cyborg has already plugged both his, and his wife's brain into the internet.

They might be prone to hacking or viruses, but they are the first people in the world to achieve real telepathy. They can sense each other's nerve impulses through the wireless chip implants, Warwick can even control robots and devices from across the world.
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Ignore gender and kick sexuality to the curb!
I'm a big mecha fan, who keeps playing the SRW series.
When I say 'My god...', god refers to Haruhi-sama.

My art album updated 11th May 2013, Science.
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Old 2013-08-28, 07:30   Link #30329
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto View Post
In e.g. online banking they would use certificates to allow the user to better detect a phishing attack.
Certificates work with fully-encrypted connections using the "Secure Sockets Layer" standard. Those are sites whose URLs begin with https://. I manage one SSL server for a healthcare provider. I don't see any performance issues arising from the additional computational power involved to handle the encryption, but a day of traffic on that site would probably constitute a minute or two's worth of traffic to nytimes.com. After this event sites like the Times may consider using only SSL in the future.

For some reason the Times registered its domain with MelbourneIT, a hosting company in Australia which also hosts twitter.com. From reading this article today, it sounds like the security on the nytimes.com domain was pretty minimal. The records weren't even locked, and the attackers gained access by using a reseller's certificate. Why the Times chose a registrar halfway around the world from them is a mystery. Domain registration is cheap, so cost cannot be the primary reason. The Times maintains its own domain-name servers, meaning that the only records at Melbourne were the ones that point to those servers. After the hack those records were changed to point to the SEA's servers. Usually companies don't change their DNS servers all that often so the records should have been locked long ago.

The CEO of Melbourne announced he was stepping down as part of an internal reorganization yesterday. The announcement seems to have come in advance of the breach, though the search for his replacement might be accelerated after yesterday's events.
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Old 2013-08-28, 07:56   Link #30330
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ascaloth View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
I happen to live in a country where the government and the civil service are held in generally high esteem.
*spit-take* *koff* *koff* *hack* *koff* *hack* *koff* *koff*

Ahem. Sorry, choked on my drink, didn't meant to interrupt. Carry on, my good people.
You don't have to take my word for it. Look up the figures yourself.

Quote:
Is the Government managing Singapore well?
Strongly agree:33 per cent
Agree:45 per cent
Neutral:13 per cent
Disagree:7 per cent
Strongly disagree:2 per cent

Is the Government forward-looking?
Strongly agree:34 per cent
Agree:42 per cent
Neutral:15 per cent
Disagree:7 per cent
Strongly disagree:2 per cent

Does the Government do what is right for Singaporeans?
Strongly agree:22 per cent
Agree:42 per cent
Neutral:23 per cent
Disagree:10 per cent
Strongly disagree:3 per cent

Does the Government understand the concerns of Singaporeans?
Strongly agree:20 per cent
Agree:41 per cent
Neutral:19 per cent
Disagree:15 per cent
Strongly disagree:5 per cent

Does the Government explain the rationale behind policies?
Strongly agree:20 per cent
Agree:42 per cent
Neutral:20 per cent
Disagree:13 per cent
Strongly disagree:5 per cent


Source: Our Singapore Conversation Survey (August 2013)

The survey polled a random sample 4,000 Singaporeans. It was conducted by the Institute of Policy Studies in conjunction with the OSC Secretariat from December 2012 to January 2013. The survey aimed to provide a snapshot of the priorities, values and preferences of Singaporeans.
There are plenty of other results that you, as a Singaporean and a social science major, ought to be interested to study. You'll find the numbers to correlate with first-hand experience of the reality on the ground, particularly with regard to LGBT issues.

Of course, there will always be haters. After all, the near 40 per cent who voted for the Opposition in 2011 do form a significant minority. But that's what they are, a minority. And most governments in developed nations would be chuffed to still secure about 60 per cent of the popular vote despite a disappointing report card.

I have my own quibbles with the government but, in the end, they're just that: quibbles. On matters of integrity, the government is still generally trustworthy. And this is so, even in spite of draconian and potentially abusive internal security laws.

You want bad? You don't have to look far beyond our own borders to find examples.
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Old 2013-08-28, 08:38   Link #30331
JokerD
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Who the heck in their right mind would take a controller and plug it into the Internet?!?!?
Convenience.
eg An engineer can troubleshoot a problem from home instead of making it all the way down to the plant. Some deal if the x-tier support is in another country, they can access the data from the site remotely.
Alternatively, they can centralize the control from a central monitoring hub to save on cost.

Quite frankly it doesn't need to be on the net to be hackable, wasn't there a case where a researcher discovered a flaw in pacemakers which allowed people to take control of it? (He died before he could present it)
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Old 2013-08-28, 08:53   Link #30332
C.A.
Absolute Haruhist!
*Artist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Age: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JokerD View Post
Quite frankly it doesn't need to be on the net to be hackable, wasn't there a case where a researcher discovered a flaw in pacemakers which allowed people to take control of it? (He died before he could present it)
Yes, he did and died, but the knowledge of how to do such a hack is already well known in the hacker community.

I watched it on a TEDtalk, which also told us that they can hack car brakes, accelerators, doors etc. and cause accidents.

Basically anything that can be accessed wirelessly can be hacked into.
__________________
No longer a NEET so I'll not be online as often.
Ignore gender and kick sexuality to the curb!
I'm a big mecha fan, who keeps playing the SRW series.
When I say 'My god...', god refers to Haruhi-sama.

My art album updated 11th May 2013, Science.
Deviant Art: http://ca0001.deviantart.com/
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Old 2013-08-28, 10:37   Link #30333
MrTerrorist
Takao Tsundere Cruiser
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Classified
US marks Martin Luther King 'I have a dream' speech



Such a powerful, beautiful speech.
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Old 2013-08-28, 13:12   Link #30334
Jinto
Asuki-tan Kairin ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Fürth (GER)
Age: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Who the heck in their right mind would take a controller and plug it into the Internet?!?!?
I wish I was allowed to tell you.
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Old 2013-08-28, 19:02   Link #30335
SaintessHeart
NYAAAAHAAANNNNN~
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto View Post
I wish I was allowed to tell you.
I can go ask around.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-08-28, 20:46   Link #30336
serenade_beta
マジ天使
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
A new day on 2ch...

Big update turns out to be the info on Hiroyuki and the people responsible for deleting posts.
Took a peek, and as far as it seems, Hiroyuki still had power over 2ch. There was rigged censoring to force people to buy 2ch Viewer. And some other nasty behind-the-curtains stuff.
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Old 2013-08-28, 21:05   Link #30337
ganbaru
books-eater youkai
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Betweem wisdom and insanity
Fort Hood shooter sentenced to death for 2009 killings
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...97Q11A20130828

San Bernardino, California, gets bankruptcy protection
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...97R18020130829
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Old 2013-08-29, 03:30   Link #30338
Jinto
Asuki-tan Kairin ↓
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Fürth (GER)
Age: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
I can go ask around.
I can only guide you in the right direction. This is how the process works in i.e. the USA:

http://www.dhs.gov/cybersecurity-results

Quote:
...
DHS also works with the private sector, other government agencies and the international community to mitigate risks by leveraging the tools, tradecraft, and techniques malicious actors use and converting them into actionable information for all 18 critical infrastructure sectors to use against cyber threats.
...
You could say, that CERT is closely working together with them. And they publish things like attack alerts or vulnerability warnings:

http://ics-cert.us-cert.gov/alerts
http://ics-cert.us-cert.gov/advisories

However, analysis data of e.g. monitored incidents against the U.S. infrastructure are not publicly available for obvious reasons. But, now you know whom to ask.
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Old 2013-08-29, 11:41   Link #30339
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
I would have posted this in silly news, but someone may have actually died. In which case, the story is not so funny.

Kim Jong Un's ex-girlfriend executed for appearing in porn
Quote:
Seoul (Aug 29, Thu): Kim Jong Un's former girlfriend has been executed by firing squad, along with a dozen fellow North Korean musicians charged with violating laws against pornography, according to reports in a respected South Korean newspaper.

The Chosun Ilbo said performers from a well-known orchestra and light music ensemble were arrested on Aug 17, accused of filming themselves having sex and then selling copies of the tapes.

While this breached North Korean anti-pornography laws, some of the musicians were also found to have Bibles in their possession and all were treated as political dissidents, according to the newspaper's unnamed source.

They were executed in public by machine-gun fire three days later. The rest of the Unhasu Orchestra and Wangjaesan Light Music Band were reportedly forced to watch.

In accordance with the country's rules on guilt by association, their families were then taken away to detention camps, according to the reports.

THE INDEPENDENT
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Old 2013-08-29, 20:32   Link #30340
speedyexpress48
Boo, you whore
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Smokin that CO bong
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
There are a few reasons why the American system is arguably broken and in need of mending. I'd guess that many other democracies are prone to similar problems, but I don't know enough about them to say.

First, the concept that elections can keep politics pure. Ideally this would happen, but American politics have an issue here. First, because of the "winner takes all" approach, electoral races are always between two candidates. Voting for a "third party" candidate is said to be equivalent to "throwing your vote away," and there are compelling arguments for and against that idea. If you aren't a part of the largest voting group, then you aren't contributing to a victory. All it takes is one group to have even a slim majority and they win, hence there is a motivation to vote for the candidate who is most likely to win and who is the closest to your views and values, in that order of priority. Adopting a system like they have in Australia (rankings instead of a single vote) would fix this.

Another issue with elections is the amount of money required, which also ties in with voter turnout. Election turnout in America is shamefully poor, which could be remedied by making voting mandatory (again, like Australia). It's also very expensive to run a campaign. How can an average working American compete against a career politician? Said politician has the time to campaign, and they usually have the financial backing of a major political party (which is another kick that keeps "third party" candidates down). Americans need to be motivated to vote and they usually don't research issues for themselves; while it isn't a pure constant, money spent on advertising and events tends to buy votes.

Given these critical issues with elections, we run into another problem. What happens when the government doesn't obey the laws that chain it down? The NSA activities have already been ruled unconstitutional by courts, and even before then the government was arguably breaking the law with some of its activities (the Patriot Act had some unconstitutional clauses, such as suspension of due process). What can you do in this scenario?
Well, when it comes to a multi party system, here's the kicker; if all goes right (or wrong, depending on who you are,) the party that takes less than a quarter of the votes can get an absolute majority in government. Hell, while Canadian elections aren't this bad, they're not too far from it, with a Party and a Prime Minister that many Canadians absolutely hate controlling everything without any sort of checks or balances, and the two main opposition parties are pretty much powerless due to the fact that both parties combined with the 4 or 5 MPs from the opposition isn't enough to do anything. Stephen Harper won less than 30% of the vote...and yet he has absolute control, with a mostly corrupt and useless government filled with shills. And who said politicians obeyed laws anywhere in any nation? There's a lot of shilling, corruption and bribery in every nation.

Plus, even if the NSA is completely struck down and closed down, you think that surveillance won't continue? They'll just rebuild it and call it something else, make it more secret and it'll run until the next scandal, and the cycle will go on. Again and again and again...

Contrary to what people believe, "Big Brother" isn't a recent development. The American government has spied on people since...the beginning of the US. And before that, England spied on the colonists. What, you thought the Cold War era didn't depend on unlimited and often illegal spying? There were "Communist bustdowns" back in the WWI era. Nowadays, it's the same damn thing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traece View Post
Is it overbearing that they could do such things? Without a doubt. Perhaps I'm disillusioned that I think they don't care about what I post on AnimeSuki, or Reddit. I suspect the same is true for the vast majority of people. Mountains of irrelevant information with no bearing on legitimate (or illegitimate) investigations. Should they be able to look at what they please and how they please whilst viewing me as a potential threat to society or some such thing? I can't rightly blame them for doing so.

The true issue tends to be more about the 'why' than the 'what'. After all, when they're running around proclaiming traitors and security threats as they please and investing in discovering every little bit of information that can be gleaned, it's hardly appropriate. The time and place isn't whoever and whenever.
Well, you *are* posting on a site that promotes piracy, overthrowing the government, and obscenity in the state of Kansas, and all that...

To be fair though, it's hard for government to really 100% completely target everything, and they really only look at the major stuff most of the time unless they have a lead, like facebook, Google, etc. Of course, since most people stick to those sites for goddamn everything and share goddamn everything sometimes on them (you're saying that sharing all of my personal info on facebook is a bad idea? You don't say!) that basically vets out 99.9% of people most of the time....
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