AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2010-03-04, 16:33   Link #6381
SaintessHeart
NYAAAAHAAANNNNN~
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosauz View Post
Not really, but the fear mongering west would be pushing this notion. It's pretty much established that China just wants to maintain land that has traditionally been Chinese, like say tibet, or taiwan, which have been part of the chinese empire ever since Shi huang di united all of china, it's not so farfetched for a country to want to maintain the borders that were established from the rich history that most chinese are quite in love with. It's why there are the swiss alps and the french alps because those borders were ordained by traiditonal segregation due to the churchs power.
Tibet and Taiwan don't belong to them in the modern world because they are no longer ideologically similar to them. What they are doing is no different from hegemonic oppression.

+1 : It is interesting to see a view like that although I don't agree with it. I don't see alot of people who think deeply about issues like this these days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anh_Minh View Post
I'm pretty sure the iPhone isn't the first touchscreen iPhone, so no, they can't patent it. They can, however, patent bits and pieces of it - maybe too much. There are supposed to be restrictions on that sort of thing, but they're subjective, and Apple can afford lots of lawyers.
Even if they can patent it, the finance and economics ministry will put it out as a general license : it is bad for market and competition, as well as R&D innovation if they are going to do that.

Heck if it goes through touchscreen smartphones will be monopolised by Steve Jobs. And there goes the free market and chances of technological innovation.

Quote:
I think, for that sort of things, patent law is pretty similar everywhere. (Conditions of attribution are a bit different in Europe, but the rights patents give you aren't.)

In France, there's the added bit that you can't buy a license and not use it for X years, but all it means is that the rights revert to the patent holder. If you're it, you can forbid everyone to use the tech for as long as the patent holds. In theory, there are circumstances where the government will force you to license it, but again... subjectivity + lawyers.
Looks like the Chief Justice is going to have alot of work in his/her hands. When it comes to subjectivity, it isn't fair to the general population who follow the law and get shortchanged by an issue involving a person with lots of dosh.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 16:45   Link #6382
Nosauz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Tibet and Taiwan don't belong to them in the modern world because they are no longer ideologically similar to them. What they are doing is no different from hegemonic oppression.

+1 : It is interesting to see a view like that although I don't agree with it. I don't see alot of people who think deeply about issues like this these days.
Well Taiwan isn't solely based on history of historical chinese borders, it also does have to do with national security, as in chinese sea boundaries, so if you take the spy plane incident during 2001, when the American spy plane was doing what knows over chinese seas, if taiwan had been recognized by the world as a free nation, then it would have meant that china had no jurisdiction over that spy plane even though they clearly were gathering intelligence.

Your idea of ideologically similar, would have ripped the united states of america into three distinct nations by now, if the rhetoric used by the tea party is to be believed. And if it were true that ideologically disimilar would be splintered, than for the most part the world would be filled with countries dedicated either to their town/village or the family level, because if you just look at the diveristy in china, there are 55 smaller sub groups within the chinese population that are distinctly unique to those regions, yet they all live under the chinese government whether it was during the feudal period or modernization via communism and puppet government established after the withdrawal of the super powers post opium wars.
Nosauz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 18:37   Link #6383
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Not *new* news.... but the weight of the evidence is pretty solid at this point. This is the sort of disaster that is nearly impossible to conceptualize (most people can barely conceptualize a local disaster).

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8550504.stm
Quote:
A panel of 41 international experts reviewed 20 years' worth of research to determine the cause of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction, around 65 million years ago. The extinction wiped out more than half of all species on the planet, including the dinosaurs, bird-like pterosaurs and large marine reptiles, clearing the way for mammals to become the dominant species on Earth.
Quote:
When the 10km-15km space rock struck the Yucatan, the explosive energy released was equivalent to 100 trillion tonnes of TNT - over a billion times more explosive than the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
The huge crater that remains from the event is some 180km in diameter and surrounded by a circular fault about 240km in diameter.
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 18:54   Link #6384
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnieS View Post
I heard awhile back that the U.S. Patent Office was reviewing the process to get rid of (or reduce?) the number of patents granted to processes. Some of those granted earlier like the "One Click Buying" one were rather... unoriginal. I can understand patenting a brilliant idea that, for example, reduces the number of steps involved in making something, but patenting processes got out of hand, IMHO. What happened to that effort anyway?
Everyone is awaiting the Supreme Court's decision in In re Bilski.

As for "xerox," there's a feature of trademark law that reduces the trademark owner's ability to protect the mark if it becomes a generic term. Kimberly-Clark lost control of "kleenex" for this reason, I believe, and Xerox Corp. has been concerned about losing its trademark for decades. I remember advertising in the 1980's telling people not to use "xerox" instead of "photocopy."
__________________
SeijiSensei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 19:13   Link #6385
mg1942
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
so what's this anti-gay state senator doing in a gay nightclub

mg1942 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 22:26   Link #6386
iLney
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Searching for weaknesses of the gay movement, I suppose.
iLney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 22:30   Link #6387
chikorita157
ひきこもりアイドル
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: New Jersey, United States
Age: 25
Send a message via Skype™ to chikorita157
Just before touchscreens, TiVo won over the patent war over DVRs... Like touchscreens, TiVo shouldn't be allowed to keep this patent since it become too general. This ruling might impact all Dish DVRs and disabling them, giving other competitors a competitive advantage.

This only proves more that the patent system seriously needs reform.

Quote:
TiVo patent court ruling could impact all Dish Network DVRs

TiVo shares rocketed nearly 59%, to $16.20, at mid-day Thursday after the digital video recorder pioneer won a key -- and possibly decisive -- court victory in a long-running patent infringement case against Dish Network.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld a lower court ruling that Dish's DVRs violate TiVo's patents, including one that enables users to watch one TV show while recording another.

The appeals judges also upheld a ruling by the U.S. District Court in eastern Texas that Dish had been in contempt after it changed the software in its DVRs, but did so in a way that continued to copy TiVo's technology.

The appeals court decision could be "the beginning of the endgame" in a six-year fight over TiVo's intellectual property, Bernstein Research analyst Craig Moffett says.

He adds: "What is at stake is nothing less than (Dish's) ability to continue to offer DVRs" -- which many satellite viewers consider an essential service. For example, he says that TiVo could "open negotiations with DirecTV for exclusivity in DVRs within the satellite space."

The decision also could help TiVo in its patent infringement cases against Verizon and AT&T, says J.P Morgan analyst Bridget Weishaar says.

Dish said, in a statement, that its 14.1 million customers "are not impacted" at this point. The company says it will ask the entire Federal Circuit to review the latest decision. Such reviews are rare, and typically occur when there are questions about the nature of the law -- not the facts of a case.

"I don't think (the hearing request) does anything" for Dish, Collins Stewart analyst Tom Eagan says.

Dish shares were down about 5%, to $20.60, at mid-day.

Barring a reversal of the decisions favoring TiVo, the big questions now involve the extent of the damages to Dish.

The Texas court has already ordered Dish to pay $300 million to TiVo for damages up to July 1, 2009. TiVo says it now will ask for more cash for patent infringements since then.

Wall Street analysts say that Dish also likely will have to cut a deal with TiVo, and pay a monthly fee to avoid having to replace millions of DVRs.

Eagan says that Dish's stock price suggests that investors believe it will have to pay $3 a month for each DVR. But he believes the final price could be closer to $4. In addition, the change could lead about 500,000 Dish customers to drop the service or switch to DirecTV or cable.

But there's no consensus. For example, Wells Fargo Securities analyst Marci Ryvicker says a monthly fee could be as high as $3 and as low as $1.75.

By David Lieberman
Source
__________________
chikorita157 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-04, 23:53   Link #6388
JMvS
Rawrrr!
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: CH aka Chocaholic Heaven
Age: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosauz View Post
Not really, but the fear mongering west would be pushing this notion. It's pretty much established that China just wants to maintain land that has traditionally been Chinese, like say tibet, or taiwan, which have been part of the chinese empire ever since Shi huang di united all of china, it's not so farfetched for a country to want to maintain the borders that were established from the rich history that most chinese are quite in love with. It's why there are the swiss alps and the french alps because those borders were ordained by traiditonal segregation due to the churchs power.
Didn't it took almost two thousand years after the reign of Quin Shi Huangdi for those territories to become part of China??????????????
Unless you want to take into account the bits of China the Tibetan Empire occasionally conquered, Tibet and China become more or less linked only in the XIIIth century when both were conquered by the Mongol Empire, afterward those relations were much more flimsy: changing from tributary, rebellion, and de facto independance troughout the Ming and Qing.
As for Taiwan, Europeans had administrations there before Koxinga kicked them out to establish a kingdom for himself, the Qing annexed it only in the XVIIth century before losing it to the Japanese two centuries later, and it was almost a century after that that the ROC reclaimed it.

And if we start using past tributary relations as jurisprudence, what about Japan and Vietnam or even most of Eurasia if we were to take the Mongol Empire as a reference... power games and claims of sovereignty are one thing, not inherently bad in my regard, but going all the way to the First Emperor and "All United Under The Sky" is more than a stretch in this case (on the other hand, Xinjian...).


I don't know where you are coming from to use the Alpine border between Switzerland and France as a comparison, but it cannot even be used as a similar case, because it has nothing to do with the Church powers, and the cultural differences there are almost non existent.
These borders are mostly if not uniquely the result of the political history of Europe, as on one side communities congealed within or were conquered by the Swiss Confederacy, and on the other side those culturally close communities were transferred to France only in the second half of the XIXth century, from the House of Savoy (which held them for more than 5 centuries) in compensation for the assistance in conquering and unifying Italy. It's even a little more complicated, as some parts of Switzerland belonged to the Savoys, and borders moved quite a lot until the Congress of Vienna following the Napoleonic Wars.


Sorry if I get touchy here, but being fond of History, especially European and East Asian History, I cannot stand it when I see incorrect facts used in and argument.
__________________

Last edited by JMvS; 2010-03-05 at 00:20.
JMvS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 00:13   Link #6389
Xellos-_^
Married
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: R'lyeh
Age: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
What kinda nonsense is this... it took almost two thousand years after the reign of Quin Shi Huangdi for those territories to become part of China.
Unless you want to take into account the bits of China the Tibetan Empire occasionally conquered, Tibet and China become more or less linked only in the XIIIth century when both were conquered by the Mongol Empire, afterward those relations were much more flimsy: changing from tributary, rebellion, and de facto independance troughout the Ming and Qing.
As for Taiwan, Europeans had administrations there before Koxinga kicked them out to establish a kingdom for himself, the Qing annexed it only in the XVIIth century before losing it to the Japanese two centuries later, and it was almost a century after that that the ROC reclaimed it.

And if we start using past tributary relations as jurisprudence, what about Japan and Vietnam or even most of Eurasia if we were to take the Mongol Empire as a reference...


I .
the Dutch were there for only 38 yrs and in a short 38yrs they hunted to extinction the Formosa Sika Deer and massacre the aborigines.
__________________

Last edited by Xellos-_^; 2010-03-05 at 00:45.
Xellos-_^ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 00:26   Link #6390
JMvS
Rawrrr!
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: CH aka Chocaholic Heaven
Age: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xellos-_^ View Post
the Dutch were there for only 38 yrs and in a short 38yrs they hunted to extinction the Formosa Sika Derr and masscare the aborigines.
Wow, I suppose that like for the Philippines there was a very important trade of dried meat for the Chinese market...
__________________
JMvS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 01:03   Link #6391
Nosauz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
Didn't it took almost two thousand years after the reign of Quin Shi Huangdi for those territories to become part of China??????????????
Unless you want to take into account the bits of China the Tibetan Empire occasionally conquered, Tibet and China become more or less linked only in the XIIIth century when both were conquered by the Mongol Empire, afterward those relations were much more flimsy: changing from tributary, rebellion, and de facto independance troughout the Ming and Qing.
As for Taiwan, Europeans had administrations there before Koxinga kicked them out to establish a kingdom for himself, the Qing annexed it only in the XVIIth century before losing it to the Japanese two centuries later, and it was almost a century after that that the ROC reclaimed it.

And if we start using past tributary relations as jurisprudence, what about Japan and Vietnam or even most of Eurasia if we were to take the Mongol Empire as a reference... power games and claims of sovereignty are one thing, not inherently bad in my regard, but going all the way to the First Emperor and "All United Under The Sky" is more than a stretch in this case (on the other hand, Xinjian...).


I don't know where you are coming from to use the Alpine border between Switzerland and France as a comparison, but it cannot even be used as a similar case, because it has nothing to do with the Church powers, and the cultural differences there are almost non existent.
These borders are mostly if not uniquely the result of the political history of Europe, as on one side communities congealed within or were conquered by the Swiss Confederacy, and on the other side those culturally close communities were transferred to France only in the second half of the XIXth century, from the House of Savoy (which held them for more than 5 centuries) in compensation for the assistance in conquering and unifying Italy. It's even a little more complicated, as some parts of Switzerland belonged to the Savoys, and borders moved quite a lot until the Congress of Vienna following the Napoleonic Wars.


Sorry if I get touchy here, but being fond of History, especially European and East Asian History, I cannot stand it when I see incorrect facts used in and argument.
The notion that china and tibet are seperate states seems to be contrary to what history says, because if the tibetan empire is considered an indepedent state it would essentially annex not only modern day tibet, but yunnan, jiangxi and many other provinces that during china's long history have been conflicted for. But in the end I see your point, although the deeprooted history between the two regions is quite obvious and the only reason that control was lost was due to the result of the opium wars which castrated the chinese government. Still, it's hypocritical for the west to be so adamant about chinese imperialism when the U.S. and many other countries are quite involved in projection of their empires and political might, let's not forget after world war II the united states had controlled the phillipines and south vietnam after the french left. Lets not even mention the countless cous the cia help implement in countries such as Argentina, Nicaragua in attempt to combat the red scare.
Nosauz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 01:13   Link #6392
Xellos-_^
Married
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: R'lyeh
Age: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosauz View Post
The notion that china and tibet are seperate states seems to be contrary to what history says, because if the tibetan empire is considered an indepedent state it would essentially annex not only modern day tibet, but yunnan, jiangxi and many other provinces that during china's long history have been conflicted for. But in the end I see your point, although the deeprooted history between the two regions is quite obvious and the only reason that control was lost was due to the result of the opium wars which castrated the chinese government. Still, it's hypocritical for the west to be so adamant about chinese imperialism when the U.S. and many other countries are quite involved in projection of their empires and political might, let's not forget after world war II the united states had controlled the phillipines and south vietnam after the french left. Lets not even mention the countless cous the cia help implement in countries such as Argentina, Nicaragua in attempt to combat the red scare.
the current president of Chile's father was torture to death by CIA back coup in 70s and she herself was subject to torture as well.
__________________
Xellos-_^ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 01:15   Link #6393
SaintessHeart
NYAAAAHAAANNNNN~
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Singapore Terrorist Warning

Quote:
SINGAPORE—Terrorists may be planning attacks on oil tankers and other large ships in the Malacca Strait, the Singapore Shipping Association said Thursday, citing an advisory from the Singapore Navy.

The navy's Information Fusion Centre "received an indication that a terrorist group is planning attacks on oil tankers in the Malacca Straits," it said in the advisory, which was reviewed by a reporter. "This does not preclude possible attacks on other large vessels with dangerous cargo."

Singapore's Ministry of Defense declined to comment. The Singapore Shipping Association declined to elaborate.

The Malacca Strait—some 550 miles long and 1.7 miles wide at its narrowest point—passes between Malaysia and the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Indonesia's Department of Defense "hasn't received any information that Singaporean tankers will be disturbed in the Straits of Malacca by terrorists," Brig. Gen. I Wayan Midio said. However, Indonesia plans to step up air and sea patrols to monitor the straits, said Mr. Midio.

The Malacca Strait is a vital link connecting the Middle East and Europe to Asia. The number of ships passing through it this year will total 117,000, according to an estimate by the Ocean Policy Research Foundation.

About 15 million barrels of oil a day flow through the strait, according to a 2006 survey by the U.S. Energy Department.

"Normally, we don't see these types of alerts" from the navy, said Alex Duperouzel, managing director at Background Asia Risk Solutions, a security consulting firm.

Information about the plans to attack oil tankers or other shipping in the busy Strait of Malacca was "recently acquired" following the detention of terrorist suspects elsewhere in Southeast Asia, a regional intelligence official said.

The Southeast Asia-based Islamist group Jemaah Islamiyah has long harbored the ambition of seizing an oil tanker and using it as a huge floating bomb, the person said.

"Terrorist groups operating in the region have looked several times at threats to the maritime domain," said terrorism expert Rohan Gunaratna of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 09:24   Link #6394
MrTerrorist
Takao Tsundere Cruiser
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Classified
S Korea child 'starves as parents raise virtual baby'

Those are horrible parents.
__________________
MrTerrorist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 10:09   Link #6395
JMvS
Rawrrr!
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: CH aka Chocaholic Heaven
Age: 30
After the recent Earthquakes and subsequent Tsunamis, the Sea is decidedly quite angry these days:

Storm Xynthia kills dozen of people in Europe and floods coastal areas
.

Rogue wave hit a Cruise Ship in the Mediterranean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
Perhaps it could also have its place in the News thread, nonetheless here is something I just found:

Princess Aiko "bullied at school".

Conclusion, even being of royal (and semi-divine) status won't help you much when put together with ordinary kids.
__________________
JMvS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 10:43   Link #6396
Kamui4356
Aria Company
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by mg1942 View Post
so what's this anti-gay state senator doing in a gay nightclub
He's probably just anti-gay to help cover up the fact that he's gay himself. Kind of like that republican US senator who was arrested for soliciting gay sex in an airport bathroom.
__________________
Kamui4356 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 12:28   Link #6397
MrTerrorist
Takao Tsundere Cruiser
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Classified
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamui4356 View Post
He's probably just anti-gay to help cover up the fact that he's gay himself. Kind of like that republican US senator who was arrested for soliciting gay sex in an airport bathroom.
Ah yes. Senator Larry Craig. Whatever happen to him?
__________________
MrTerrorist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 13:43   Link #6398
mg1942
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
...is anyone noticing this trend?
Republicans always have gay sex scandals and Democrats are tax cheats
mg1942 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 13:44   Link #6399
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
Its almost a 100% correlation that extreme homophobes are closeting their own tendencies on the matter. Same goes for "pedo-witchhunters" -- they see horrors that most normal people realize aren't there.

And yeah... the Democrats have a long long historical tradition of graft, political machines, and tax cheating. Womanizing as well.

What it boils down to is that no matter what the party -- many politicians are borderline or full-blown sociopaths. A great many leaders in history show all the symptoms of sociopathic behavior. The majority of us who don't actually want to be in charge and just want to get along with everyone just make it easy for the cwazy-people-in-big-hats.

(1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
(2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure
(3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
(4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
(5) reckless disregard for safety of self or others
(6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
(7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
Vexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-05, 17:40   Link #6400
Haruka_Kitten
The AnimeSuki Pet kitten
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: A furry den
Age: 21
Send a message via MSN to Haruka_Kitten Send a message via Yahoo to Haruka_Kitten Send a message via Skype™ to Haruka_Kitten
Indian toddler Gurshan Singh death mystery in Melbourne deepens

Quote:
EVEN an in depth police interview lasting several hours with the parents of dead Gurshan Singh has failed to shed light on what happened.

The body of three-year-old Gurshan Singh was found near Melbourne Airport on Thursday night, about 30 kms from where the toddler disappeared from a house in Lalor six hours earlier.

The infant, who was on a three-month vacation in Australia with his parents, vanished while his mother, Hartreet Kaur Channa, was having a shower.

An autopsy failed to determine the cause of his death, the Herald Sun reports.

There was no evidence of violence on his body, which was found fully-clothed in blue jeans and a gray shirt.

Police hoped further testing, including toxicology tests, could provide answers.

Investigators were believed to be leaning away from the theory that Gurshan fell victim to a random attack.

One possibility was that he died of natural causes, and someone panicked and disposed of his body.

Detectives also examined suggestions that Gurshan disappeared after he tried to follow his father to the local library.

Family friend Sim Kaur said the boy was screaming because his father, Harjit Singh Channa, went to the library without him.

"Before his father left for the library, he was crying to take him as well, but his mother said, 'No, you will stay here,'" she said.

"He was just wandering in the kitchen, in the rooms, shouting and, like, pulling down things.

"He stopped shouting and I thought, what happened?"

The case threatened to further strain relations between India and Australia, already tense following a series of allegedly racist attacks against Indian citizens in Melbourne.

An Indian community leader who visited Gurshan's parents said he believed "racism was alive and well in Australia" but police urged people not to pre-judge matters.

"It's very early days in our investigation and we are treating the circumstances as suspicious and we will see where the facts take us," said detective inspector Steve Clark.

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said: "If this is a case of murder, there is nothing worse than the brutal murder of a little child ... we are confident the authorities will get to the bottom of it."
This is just sickening, and at a time when relations between India and Australia are already weakened by the murder of an Indian student months ago.
__________________
"That bus! It has an awesome ring to it!"
Haruka_Kitten is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
current affairs, discussion, international, news

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:01.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.