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Old 2010-03-13, 22:31   Link #6521
yoropa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosauz View Post
Facts tend to have a liberal bias it's sad but true
I would disagree with this. Facts don't have a bias, but the way a fact is presented can have a bias. For example, "America broke away from the British Empire" is a fact. No bias, just a fact. "America broke away from the British Empire using methods of terrorism, such as destroying British shipments of tea" or "America broke away from the British Empire who was subjugating Americans to lesser lives by taxing them" both can be seen as biased.
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Old 2010-03-14, 04:44   Link #6522
Jinto
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Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
In this regard, the Southern route will certainly provide the most technical challenges, due to all the mountains and tropical climate. Political barriers are less of a concerns, as Burma and Vietnam seems quite eager for it and ready to adapt their gauge.
The question is, whether they will adapt it nation-wide or just for this project. I believe if this project is ever meant to be successful the chinese have to pay it basically themselves (I will explain this later).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
On the other hand, the Northern route will face mostly political challenges, as the Russians have to balance their desire to upgrade infrastructure and develop the Far East with the concern of Chinese migrations in their territory and the need to change their gauge. Notice that such an overhaul of the Russian railways network would also open it to Western Europe, with consecutive benefits (as well as concerns).
There are no real benefits to changing their gauge. Goods are transfered from one freight train to another at the border. If we consider customs and similar bureaucracy here, the goods would have to be screened there anyway. When the goods switch their means of transportation in the process, it is not so much longer a delay in cargo transportation than without the different gauges.
Besides their whole stock of trains (even the new EMU Sapsan) is based on the wider gauge. They do not even have a unified energy grid for electric trains on national level (south and north use completely different currents and imo they're even different in that one uses AC while the other uses DC).
If ever, the chinese have to create an insular solution within Russia. That means their system remains incompatible with the russian railway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMvS View Post
Regarding the costs of building the network, as long as there is a need for connection and a political will to address it, I have little concerns, as high speed railways have already been demonstrated as the optimal solution: cheaper than high ways or even large roads, speed second only to airplane, capacity second to high sea freighting.
More so, most if not all the technologies not only exist but are already applied widely.
But sea freighting and air frighting will be the actual competitors since, in each of their domains they are the best solutions. For sea freighting it is transportation of very large amounts of goods at low costs but the disadvantage of the delivery time span.
For air freighting it is the fastest way to transport goods, but at high costs and limited capacity (space/weight).
The mix of both solutions works well at the moment. The method to use trains will only get a certain market share, since it is a solution sitting somewhere in between of the other two. So, it is not exactly the optimal solution, it is just a different approach, that can close a gap of transportation options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamui4356 View Post
Yes, this will allow China to project power well beyond its borders, a capability they currently lack. Of course that might not be the intent of the people behind it, but even if it isn't, will it stay that way? Though on the other hand, a pan-Eurasian high speed rail system could mean great things for the economies of central Asian states.
I don't get that power projection idea. It does not really make that much sense.

1) This power projection works both ways, since the railway network can technically be used by all its member states. (in a case of crisis anyway)

2) If china does not plan some sort of blitzkrieg by the means of using that railway system it will be utterly useless for projection of military power (and a nuclear weapons armed country certainly does not rely on such military strategies).

3) Economical projection of power could work this way, for reasons I will explain below. Political projection of power does not really gain something from such a project.

In my oppinion the reason someone came up with this idea is another one.

China has developed the technology to build reliable, high speed railway networks. Currently they use this capacity on a national level only.
However, they can realize such projects at very low costs (in comparison to other industrialized countries). They also bought the license for an EMU design from Siemens, that allows them to build high speed trains for rather low costs for the domestic market.
And I think the chinese see an opportunity to make use of these advantages in such an eurasian project (which would extremely boost their local industries in that sector).
So, chinese railway industries could project economical power (at a certainly unchallenged price). Additionaly, in the case of export oriented china the whole network could benefit other industries too, since it makes an additional option/means of transportation available on pan-eurasian level.

However, I cannot say if they will succeed in the south, but I really have my doubts regarding the northern project. When using freight and people transportation on the same line one would need at least 4 tracks. Additionaly, for high speed EMUs, the whole track must be electrified. There is a need for additional infrastructure along the tracks for maintenance and electricity. The initial costs will surely amount to over US$ 500 billion (based on the estimation that 25,000 km of HSR in china will cost US$ 300 billion - and 8,000km x 4 = 32,000km of track is needed). Now, US$ 500 billion is more like the lower end of the cost estimation and still a very large sum... (that might explain, why I have my little doubts about this).
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Old 2010-03-14, 09:33   Link #6523
Nosauz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yoropa View Post
I would disagree with this. Facts don't have a bias, but the way a fact is presented can have a bias. For example, "America broke away from the British Empire" is a fact. No bias, just a fact. "America broke away from the British Empire using methods of terrorism, such as destroying British shipments of tea" or "America broke away from the British Empire who was subjugating Americans to lesser lives by taxing them" both can be seen as biased.
No the idea of the comment is that the republican strategy is to lie and lie some more hence facts having a liberal bias, and the reason why republicans/conservatives rarely use them since using them would be biased against their own agenda, it's meant to be tongue and cheek.
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Old 2010-03-14, 10:49   Link #6524
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yoropa View Post
I would disagree with this. Facts don't have a bias, but the way a fact is presented can have a bias. For example, "America broke away from the British Empire" is a fact. No bias, just a fact. "America broke away from the British Empire using methods of terrorism, such as destroying British shipments of tea" or "America broke away from the British Empire who was subjugating Americans to lesser lives by taxing them" both can be seen as biased.
A fact, is an opinion agreed upon wholly by the majority. The original Newton's Laws are considered indomitable in the science society until Einstein's theory of relativity came out.

And by agreeing on something wholly, it is already a bias. That is why we practice something called the "benefit of doubt".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinto View Post
However, I cannot say if they will succeed in the south, but I really have my doubts regarding the northern project. When using freight and people transportation on the same line one would need at least 4 tracks. Additionaly, for high speed EMUs, the whole track must be electrified. There is a need for additional infrastructure along the tracks for maintenance and electricity. The initial costs will surely amount to over US$ 500 billion (based on the estimation that 25,000 km of HSR in china will cost US$ 300 billion - and 8,000km x 4 = 32,000km of track is needed). Now, US$ 500 billion is more like the lower end of the cost estimation and still a very large sum... (that might explain, why I have my little doubts about this).
To add some math in, what about inflation? And the property bubble? The property debt in China can cause a serious dent in the government treasury, coupled with the money, lack of real quality control, then throwing possible inflation into the mix after the RMB's peg is removed, won't it cost like around $500 trillion instead?

EDIT : Looks like China is in for a crunch.

China's Lawmakers Turn to Plight of 'Ants'.

Quote:
BEIJING—A string of villages on the outskirts of Beijing has become the unlikely focus of a national discussion about China's stubbornly tough job market for young people, as officials meet in the capital for the annual session of China's legislature.

The area north of Beijing is populated by young people who call themselves the "ant tribe" because of their industriousness as well as their crowded, modest living conditions. Members of the National People's Congress, which is meeting this week in Beijing, held a press conference Thursday to highlight the plight of unemployed graduates and call for far-reaching reforms in the education system, which they say hasn't prepared students adequately for the job market. Proposals included more vocational training and greater interaction between schools and employers.

"The living conditions of some 'ants' could easily make people feel worried and also trigger people's discontented mood," said Ge Jianxiong, a member of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, the advisory body that meets alongside the congress this week. "This has to be given great attention by both the government and society."

Earlier this month, some conference members visited the village. Several said they were moved to tears when they heard two students, who share a five-square-meter (54 square-feet) room, sang a song they composed about their tough lives.

Government statistics show 87% of college graduates found work last year. But many graduates doubt those figures, and they say that jobs that are available often pay a barely livable wage.

Underemployment among young graduates is the product largely of a rapid expansion by the country's state-controlled universities over the last decade that dramatically increased enrollment without adjusting the curriculum to provide students with more marketable skills.

Officials have acknowledged problems. Premier Wen Jiabao, in his annual work report that kicked off the National People's Congress last week, pledged to adjust university curriculums to "meet employment needs and the needs of economic and social development." He also announced plans to spend more than $6 billion this year to stimulate employment, with an emphasis on helping recent college graduates.
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The term "ant tribe" was coined by Lian Si, a professor at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing. In survey he made of 600 Beijing-area graduates between 2007 and 2009, Mr. Lian found their average monthly income was the equivalent of $300.

"The life of these college graduates is pretty tough," Mr. Lian said. "And what's worse, behind them, there are more than a million Chinese families" who sent their children to college hoping they'd make it in the big cities.

One of the places where the young people congregate is Xiaoyuehe, a crumbling one-street village on the north end of Beijing. On one side is a small canal and the other a crazy quilt of dorm-like rooms, cheap restaurants and muddy paths. Several thousand migrants live there, many of whom are college graduates from across China.

One is Zhao Lei, a 24-year-old computer science major who graduated in 2008 from Beijing Jiaotong University. Mr. Zhao shares a 12-square-meter with five others. "For most of us who live here, we choose to live here as we have no alternatives," Mr. Zhao said. "This is a place we could afford with our meager income when we first step into society."

Mr. Zhao said it's good to know that the "ant tribe" that he belongs to finally caught wide attention from society, but he also says that what they need is not discussion but "real help that won't cause our dreams to be shattered by cruel reality."

Mr. Lian, the professor, estimates that there are more than 100,000 college graduates living in different "settlement villages" on the periphery of Beijing. The number has grown quickly in recent years as more college graduates from rapidly expanding universities around China flocked to big cities like Beijing and Shanghai. A big portion of the college graduates stuck in the settlement villages on the outskirts of Beijing are from rural China. Those who have jobs are mostly engaged in temporary IT-related work in Zhongguancun, a district of the city sometimes called China's Silicon Valley, or in the services industry.

Local officials say they're trying to improve the situation. Officials in Tangjialing recently rolled out an ambitious plan to renovate the area by investing the equivalent of $600 million to replace the hovels with high-rise apartment buildings that can house 20,000 college graduates.
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Last edited by SaintessHeart; 2010-03-14 at 11:26.
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Old 2010-03-14, 12:36   Link #6525
yoropa
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Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
A fact, is an opinion agreed upon wholly by the majority. The original Newton's Laws are considered indomitable in the science society until Einstein's theory of relativity came out.
Facts don't have to be agreed on by the majority since there are ignorant people in this world. Canada is located in North America. While I'm sure someone somewhere disagrees with this, it is a fact.

Scientific equations and observations of the universe fall outside the realm of complete fact since there may or may not exist incidents and cases that could disprove them. Those simply haven't been discovered yet. That's why it's the theory of gravity, or the Pythagorean Theorem, not the Law of Gravity or the Pythagorean Law. They are mostly factual.

And something for you to ponder now. 1+1=2 is a fact. Unlike the scientific realm, basic mathematics is lawful and factual. Now let's say you go to a community that thinks 1+1=3. Does that mean 1+1=2 is no longer a fact, or does that mean this community is ignorant to the fact? Before life even existed, did 1+1=2? Yes, it did. It is a fact. Regardless of the lack of life to ponder such concepts, 1 and 1 still made 2.

So I will disagree with your statement of "A fact, is an opinion agreed upon wholly by the majority." Even without people, a fact is still a fact.

EDIT: Do note that in more complex math it may become difficult to prove that 1+1=2.
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Old 2010-03-14, 14:01   Link #6526
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yoropa View Post
Facts don't have to be agreed on by the majority since there are ignorant people in this world. Canada is located in North America. While I'm sure someone somewhere disagrees with this, it is a fact.

Scientific equations and observations of the universe fall outside the realm of complete fact since there may or may not exist incidents and cases that could disprove them. Those simply haven't been discovered yet. That's why it's the theory of gravity, or the Pythagorean Theorem, not the Law of Gravity or the Pythagorean Law. They are mostly factual.

And something for you to ponder now. 1+1=2 is a fact. Unlike the scientific realm, basic mathematics is lawful and factual. Now let's say you go to a community that thinks 1+1=3. Does that mean 1+1=2 is no longer a fact, or does that mean this community is ignorant to the fact? Before life even existed, did 1+1=2? Yes, it did. It is a fact. Regardless of the lack of life to ponder such concepts, 1 and 1 still made 2.

So I will disagree with your statement of "A fact, is an opinion agreed upon wholly by the majority." Even without people, a fact is still a fact.

EDIT: Do note that in more complex math it may become difficult to prove that 1+1=2.
There is where we delve into the accuracy of the facts, where the details are murky and diluted at best. This would piss Irencius off, but how do you explain historical facts?

If you want something about 1 + 1 = 2, it isn't a fact, it is a truth. That is why in maths, we prove by means of an induction, that it is true, not prove by means it is a fact.

That is why when someone points out "true to the fact", it means that the person has a doubt over a generalisation of a "truth" which is agreed and pointed out by a large majority to be true. It is hard to explain further, but you might want to check through the dictionary, and the areas which these words are used in to describe something.
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Old 2010-03-14, 14:18   Link #6527
OceanBlue
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
There is where we delve into the accuracy of the facts, where the details are murky and diluted at best. This would piss Irencius off, but how do you explain historical facts?

If you want something about 1 + 1 = 2, it isn't a fact, it is a truth. That is why in maths, we prove by means of an induction, that it is true, not prove by means it is a fact.

That is why when someone points out "true to the fact", it means that the person has a doubt over a generalisation of a "truth" which is agreed and pointed out by a large majority to be true. It is hard to explain further, but you might want to check through the dictionary, and the areas which these words are used in to describe something.
The problem with induction is that it assumes that if something continues to be true for a very long period of time, it will always be true. It's not obvious with things like 1 + 1 = 2, but induction tends to be a problem in other situations.

For example, you can use induction to assume that, because the sun rises and has always risen, it will always rise. But that's obviously not the case.

For math, Euler and prime numbers can be used as an example:
Quote:
During the beginning of the 17th century, Fermat proved that every prime number of the form 4n + 1 could be written as the sum of two squares. Fermat ... stated that the numbers 2n + 1 are always prime if n is a power of 2. Numbers that have this property were called Fermat numbers. After 100 years, Euler prooved that this formula does not always work because 232 + 1 is equal to 4,294,967,297, which is not prime (it is divisible by 641).
http://www.lycos.com/info/prime-numb...ard-euler.html

I'm not saying that induction is always a bad method, of course, but it can't always be used to find truth.
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Old 2010-03-14, 14:33   Link #6528
SaintessHeart
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Originally Posted by OceanBlue View Post
The problem with induction is that it assumes that if something continues to be true for a very long period of time, it will always be true. It's not obvious with things like 1 + 1 = 2, but induction tends to be a problem in other situations.

For example, you can use induction to assume that, because the sun rises and has always risen, it will always rise. But that's obviously not the case.

For math, Euler and prime numbers can be used as an example:

http://www.lycos.com/info/prime-numb...ard-euler.html

I'm not saying that induction is always a bad method, of course, but it can't always be used to find truth.
Though you have misread my prove to be a find, I point out that in the case of Mathematical Induction, you can. The idea of doing it is to start with an end and start point (assume that Pn is true, if Pn is true, Pk is true. Prove that Pk is true).

I have never tried if it works, but if we have Pn-1, Pn-2, and Pn-3 within a set of historical record that has already been proven true, and there is no change in the progression, another set of truth can be proven. If the word of having a couple of things is still two, and if we couple together things, 1 + 1 will be proven true as 2.

Having said all that, the idea of truth is to be true at the said moment, and thus proven. If there is a negligible (approved by the general masses) change, it will become a fact.

P.S Why the heck am I talking about math? I am supposed to hate math! Arrrrggghhhh!!! *rampages*
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Old 2010-03-14, 16:57   Link #6529
yoropa
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Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
This would piss Irencius off, but how do you explain historical facts?
Historic facts don't need much explanation. An event in history is an event in history. The reason why it happened and the exact details how it happened may not be fully clear, and are up for debate, some of which end with quite interesting results, but the event actually happening is a fact.

My earlier example was that "The United States broke from the British Empire." I think that's about as raw and general as you can make it, and I do believe everything I said with that sentence is true. Explanations of why and how are up to debate. And again you're at the mercy of the way the winner has written about it. I do believe the old saying is "History is written by the winners."

Another example is "Barack H. Obama is the current President of the United States of America. His predecessor was George W. Bush." That is true.

Quote:
For example, you can use induction to assume that, because the sun rises and has always risen, it will always rise. But that's obviously not the case.
You can assume that but it isn't true. I'm trying to make a case that there is a distinction between what is true and what we think is true. I think you would agree with me that there is a distinction between the two.

EDIT: Once again I have derailed a topic. Sorry guys!
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Old 2010-03-14, 17:08   Link #6530
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...031103038.html

Quote:
SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court upheld the use of the words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance and "In God We Trust" on U.S. currency, rejecting arguments Thursday that the phrases violate the separation of church and state.
.....

Quote:
Bea noted that schools do not require students to recite the pledge, which was amended to include the words "under God" by a 1954 federal law. Members of Congress at the time said they wanted to set the United States apart from "godless communists."

hmmm...who's more intolerant, the "godless commies" or the xtians nut jobs? They don't HAVE to say the freaking thing, just stand up and shut their yaps for 45 seconds. Does hearing the word "God" somehow damage them?
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Old 2010-03-14, 18:30   Link #6531
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Originally Posted by mg1942 View Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...031103038.html


.....




hmmm...who's more intolerant, the "godless commies" or the xtians nut jobs? They don't HAVE to say the freaking thing, just stand up and shut their yaps for 45 seconds. Does hearing the word "God" somehow damage them?
Ok let's pretend the words "under god" were changed to "there is no god" or "under allah praise to him and to Muhammad his prophet" How would a christian parent react if their child had to listen to the entire school say god doesn't exist every morning or that Islam is the true faith? Is this really any different? Even if they don't have to say it, they still have to hear it every day. The pledge shouldn't be about religion anyway, it should be about pride in the nation, and this whole under god thing wasn't even originally in it.
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Old 2010-03-14, 19:38   Link #6532
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http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE62D0ZX20100314

Quote:
U.S. to roll out major broadband policy

(Reuters) - U.S. regulators will announce a major Internet policy this week to revolutionize how Americans communicate and play, proposing a dramatic increase in broadband speeds that could let people download a high-definition film in minutes instead of hours.

TECHNOLOGY | MEDIA

Dramatically increasing Internet speeds to 25 times the current average is one of the myriad goals to be unveiled in the National Broadband Plan by the the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday.

The highly anticipated plan will make a series of recommendations to Congress and is aimed at spurring the ever-changing communications industry to bring more and faster online services to Americans as they increasingly turn to the Internet to communicate, pay monthly bills, make travel plans and be entertained by movies and music.

"This is a fairly unique event," said Paul Gallant, an analyst with Concept Capital. "The FCC really has never been asked to design a broad regulatory shift like this. Broadband is important and difficult because it threatens every established communications sector."

Some details of the plan have trickled out in the last few weeks including how to find spectrum to meet an anticipated explosion of handset devices capable of playing movies and music in addition to handling emails and voice calls.

But some carriers like AT&T Inc and Qwest Communications International Inc were irked last month when the agency's chief, Julius Genachowski, announced that the FCC would propose in the plan a goal of 100 Mbps speeds to be in place at 100 million American homes in 10 years. The current average is less than 4 Mbps.

In a sign of tension between the FCC and carriers, Qwest called it "a dream" and AT&T reacted by saying the FCC should resist calls for "extreme forms of regulation."

Since the FCC announcement, Cisco Systems Inc announced it would introduce a router that can handle Internet traffic up to 12 times faster than rival products. Google Inc has also gotten in on the hype, saying it plans to build a super-fast Internet network to show that it can be done. The FCC has praised both announcements.

The plans could also touch off tensions with television broadcasters, who will be asked to give up spectrum to wireless carriers who desperately need it for their mobile devices, such as the iPhone and Blackberry.

The FCC plans to let them share in the profits of auctions structured to redistribute the spectrum.

"We've developed a plan that is a real win-win for everyone involved and we have every expectation that it will work," Genachowski said in an interview with Reuters.

"We've certainly heard from a number of broadcasters who told us they think this is a promising direction and are getting ready to roll up their sleeves with us," he said.

The FCC also wants to make sure that anchor institutions -- government buildings, schools, libraries and healthcare facilities -- get speeds of about 1 gigabit per second by 2020.

The full broadband plan is expected to be released at a Tuesday meeting among the FCC's five members who are expected to discuss the results and recommendations of the roadmap, which was mandated by Congress. Congress may have to pass legislation to enact some portions of the plan.

FCC officials have said some of the goals are aspirational and should be viewed as a "living, breathing" document for the next decade in hopes of helping 93 million Americans without broadband get connected.

ACHIEVABLE

"It is both aspiration and achievable," Genachowski said.

The Obama administration has touted the plan as a way to create jobs and make energy use more efficient.

"It will be a call to action," said Blair Levin, who heads the FCC's broadband task force which has collected data and comments from the industry, academics and the public as well as from three dozen public workshops.

The FCC has placed most of its attention on broadband policy which Darrell West, director of governance studies at the Brookings Institution, called "the signature issue" since Genachowski took over the helm in late June.

"It means that broadband is going to drive other types of policy decisions and it really sets the parameters for telecommunications and new applications," West said.

FCC officials have said that the plan will not take sides on technology or applications, but they want to lay the groundwork to spur innovation and job creation.

Officials have said the plan will ask Congress to fund up to $16 billion to build an emergency public safety system.

It would also tell lawmakers that a one-time injection of $9 billion could accelerate broadband reach to the 4 percent of Americans who do have access. Otherwise they could let the FCC carry out a 10-year plan to realign an $8 billion U.S. subsidy program for universal broadband access instead of universal phone access.

Experts call the plan ambitious but question if the FCC, which plans to spin off a series of rule-making proposals linked to the plan, can realistically make good on its recommendations.

"There's so little progress on this stuff in Washington," said Rob Atkinson, who heads the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

"I think Chairman Genachowski has a real opportunity to bring different warring interests under 50-75 percent of the plan."

(Reporting by John Poirier and Sinead Carew, editing by Matthew Lewis)
Looks like America will finally get the technology it deserves, I hope...
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Old 2010-03-14, 20:11   Link #6533
mg1942
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Originally Posted by Kamui4356 View Post
Ok let's pretend the words "under god" were changed to "there is no god" or "under allah praise to him and to Muhammad his prophet" How would a christian parent react if their child had to listen to the entire school say god doesn't exist every morning or that Islam is the true faith? Is this really any different? Even if they don't have to say it, they still have to hear it every day. The pledge shouldn't be about religion anyway, it should be about pride in the nation, and this whole under god thing wasn't even originally in it.
I believe said xtian parents would vote the fucks out who created that scenario.
If we were ANYwhere but the US, your scenario would be quite plausible.
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Old 2010-03-14, 20:39   Link #6534
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A little bit of derailment:

Spoiler for slightly OT/responses to SaintessHeart:
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Old 2010-03-14, 21:12   Link #6535
Kamui4356
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Originally Posted by mg1942 View Post
I believe said xtian parents would vote the fucks out who created that scenario.
If we were ANYwhere but the US, your scenario would be quite plausible.
It isn't about whether it's plausible or not, it's a thought experiment. Now, you agree that christian parents wouldn't like their children being exposed to it, and would take some sort of action? Why then should atheist parents accept what christian parents wouldn't?
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Old 2010-03-15, 03:11   Link #6536
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Tiger Woods back under same roof as Elin Nordegren and kids - reports
Yeah....the Tiger's back in the cage....wait that's not right....
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Old 2010-03-15, 03:13   Link #6537
SaintessHeart
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Originally Posted by Harufox View Post
Tiger Woods back under same roof as Elin Nordegren and kids - reports
Yeah....the Tiger's back in the cage....wait that's not right....
So you would rather it be out there screwing people around?
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Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2010-03-15, 03:15   Link #6538
Haruka_Kitten
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
So you would rather it be out there screwing people around?
god no....
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Old 2010-03-15, 03:31   Link #6539
Claies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harufox View Post
Tiger Woods back under same roof as Elin Nordegren and kids - reports
Yeah....the Tiger's back in the cage....wait that's not right....
Why is this important? What a private man who keeps to himself does with his own life should be nobody's business, no matter how much money he makes.

I'm not pinning this on you, by the way. I'm just pissed that the American media has so much bias for human stories.
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Old 2010-03-15, 05:00   Link #6540
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claies View Post
Why is this important? What a private man who keeps to himself does with his own life should be nobody's business, no matter how much money he makes.

I'm not pinning this on you, by the way. I'm just pissed that the American media has so much bias for human stories.
But then again, on how his wife threw a tantrum on him, it goes to show that female tigers are more dangerous.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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