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Old 2009-04-03, 08:26   Link #121
chikorita157
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I have played the piano many years since grade school to high school (probably 8+ years). I played mainly classical pieces. I'm never that good at playing really complicated pieces or playing at a fast tempo and it would take alot of practice.

Metronome also helps to maintain the proper tempo.
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Old 2009-04-03, 08:35   Link #122
Justin Kim
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Ok thanks alot guys, but the real question I am imposing here on this topic is: How can you improve your finger velocity as well as accuracy at the same time. I am playing complicated pieces, and as a pianist knows, Chopin requires alot of rubato, that is primarily his style. Liszt requires fluid octaves as well as technical chord studies. I just want to increase finger speed without playing scales, Hanon isn't really scales - just training of independent finger strength, scales are pretty much single - noted chords that go either upscale or downscale upon the treble or base clef. I have a semi-perfect pitch gift, meaning I can hear notes and play them 50/50, in addition to metronomes, I can match a tempo pretty easily. I just want my cardial muscles to regenerate so I can play piano faster and properly again. Does anyone know of a legitimate way to do so? By the way, my piano is weighted for individual finger training purposes. Meaning the wood keys are at least around 0.5x harder to push down upon than a regular Steinway baby grand key layout.
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Old 2009-04-03, 08:38   Link #123
Sinfully Naomi
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That's why I said you should practice scales again. It should give you both speed, and accuracy. A way to motivater youself to do better as well is if you mess up, you have to start over completely, no matter how close to the end you are. I bet you wold get more accuracy from that.
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Old 2009-04-03, 09:11   Link #124
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Hello, I play the piano also. Hanon's a really good book. I really recommend that namely the one "for the virtuoso pianist". But make sure you take breaks too. It doesn't only strengthen your fingers but it also improves your agility. There are various pieces there which have finger labeling. You should make sure you follow that. And also due to the intervals it also helps you practice your finger extensions. You can try playing 1 piece at a time, then master it, or 2 pieces at a time. It would be better if you memorize them too. They come in useful when you play classical pieces or even others

As for scales, they don't contribute much to accuracy probably only when you have lots of flats or sharps present. Arpeggios are good for gaining better speed and accuracy.
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Old 2009-04-03, 10:16   Link #125
KimmyChan
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I'm afraid to say that I don't personally play the piano, but have always wanted to

And also, the absolute musical piano legend that is the one & only Elton John is my idol
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Old 2009-04-03, 11:28   Link #126
SaintessHeart
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I used to play the piano and started at 4, until I entered high school. I no longer have the will to play, classical music becomes so boring.

People used to say that I often lose touch with my surroundings when I play music, but after stopping for so long, it is hard to get that touch back.

But since K-On! is showing right now, I may just pick it up again.

@ Naomi - Try getting/creating your own pieces to play. Flight of the bumblebee may seem good, but if you can chart the notes for Nana Mizuki's PRIDE OF GLORY (which came with her release of Shin Ai for White Album), it is a better song to play. Speedy pieces is all about technique and flow, once you gain momentum, there is no stopping because a real musician plays with his/her heart, not the mind.

@ Amore - Hanon is good for training fingers, but I would suggest playing the scales/arpeggios of 5 octaves (3 octaves for Grade 5 ABRSM onwards) at 150 BPM (150 crochets/quarternotes per minute), staccatossimo to train stamina and precision. The quick bursts of speed takes time getting used to. Challenge yourself to do all the keys from the first A to the subsequent G from one end of the piano to another, all in one go without any breaks, and in 2 weeks time you should have a pretty solid fingering without any holes (PUN UNINTENDED).

@ Kimmy - It is never too old to learn. I learnt the drums and bass at 17, guitar at 19 and now I am thinking of trying the violin (just to play Etude Pour Les Petites Supercordes). I can teach......at a price
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Old 2009-04-03, 16:26   Link #127
oompa loompa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Kim View Post
Ok thanks alot guys, but the real question I am imposing here on this topic is: How can you improve your finger velocity as well as accuracy at the same time. I am playing complicated pieces, and as a pianist knows, Chopin requires alot of rubato, that is primarily his style. Liszt requires fluid octaves as well as technical chord studies. I just want to increase finger speed without playing scales, Hanon isn't really scales - just training of independent finger strength, scales are pretty much single - noted chords that go either upscale or downscale upon the treble or base clef. I have a semi-perfect pitch gift, meaning I can hear notes and play them 50/50, in addition to metronomes, I can match a tempo pretty easily. I just want my cardial muscles to regenerate so I can play piano faster and properly again. Does anyone know of a legitimate way to do so? By the way, my piano is weighted for individual finger training purposes. Meaning the wood keys are at least around 0.5x harder to push down upon than a regular Steinway baby grand key layout.
mmm.. what im going to say is more or less wild guesses, purely taken from personal experience, but, i guess its worth hearing?

i used to play the flute, for.. er.. 5 years or so, then stopped for another 5 years and recently picked it up again. I found more than my muscles not being able to keep up, it was more like i had just forgotten the movements. My timing though, was absolutely awful when i first started again, then after i had it in my head right, my fingers followed on their own - just practice i guess, that would be the best way to train your muscles again. Of course, the piano requires a lot more 'finger toning' ( is what i like to call it ) compared to the flute, so it will take a longer time to get your fingers to follow you as you want. I had other problems though, I had to regain ( or try to) tempo and capacity for breathing to play the flute ( 3 years of smoking pot does some rather bad things to your lungs ).. it took about 1 and a half months, and I was almost back to normal. I cant suggest you any particular exercises, infact i would rather not suggest you any - the best way to get your fingers working as they should is simply by practice - It does take a while and a bit of patience to get back to how good you were earlier.

As for actual drills/exercies on the piano, I second what Cuppy Cake had posted earlier ( I played the piano for 3 years, and my brothers played it for 10)
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Old 2009-04-03, 19:47   Link #128
Nosauz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmoreDoll View Post
Hello, I play the piano also. Hanon's a really good book. I really recommend that namely the one "for the virtuoso pianist". But make sure you take breaks too. It doesn't only strengthen your fingers but it also improves your agility. There are various pieces there which have finger labeling. You should make sure you follow that. And also due to the intervals it also helps you practice your finger extensions. You can try playing 1 piece at a time, then master it, or 2 pieces at a time. It would be better if you memorize them too. They come in useful when you play classical pieces or even others

As for scales, they don't contribute much to accuracy probably only when you have lots of flats or sharps present. Arpeggios are good for gaining better speed and accuracy.
Seconded, hanon is probably one of the best ways to increase your dexterity and accuracy, because it requires your figers to play a multitude of intervals over and over again while having your hand shift, and since most of the pieces require you to build up your speed it becomes very helpful in a daily practice routine on top of practicing whatever pieces you play. though i do suggest you do this on a real piano because currently when i transition from my electric to my real piano the dexterity loss is pretty significant. Also arpeggios are awesome for building your pitch, and if your like me not being blessed with perfect pitch then its a great way to work on your theory.
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Old 2009-04-03, 19:48   Link #129
LeoXiao
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I can still sort of play Für Elise and if I don't actively concentrate too much on the actual notes and instead let my fingers' memory do the work, I can play Ave Maria.
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Old 2009-04-03, 22:23   Link #130
Justin Kim
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There are other study books out there by Czerny? I have finished Hanon many years ago, my dexterity is good enough to play any song. But what I need is a technical study book for etudes. Does anyone know any other Czerny practice books that will aid me in the proper technique of playing these etudes without fatigue?
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Old 2009-04-03, 22:49   Link #131
denice25
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not that good in playing piano.. but i do love to improve my skills!!
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Old 2009-04-03, 22:55   Link #132
ClockWorkAngel
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@Justin

You should probably get into scales again, if only to help with the warming up. However the theory there is wonderful (Something I've only recently realized) and will help with your playing alot. Do chromatics, for goof fingering and muscle strength.

I started when I was 7, stopped my lessons at 14. However half a year in, I somehow revived my will to play. It hasn't been until recently that I've actually began to accelerate my learning faster than ever.

Play hard songs, that's the best way to get back into it, even if you struggle through every bar, play it, again and again, make sure you like the song By the way or you'll never finish it.

Get into Jazz or improvisation, once you've played long enough the successive chords will just come to you, even if they're just simple chords.

The most important thing is motivation, and heart! If you love the piano it'll come back to you without a worry. Just play songs you love, and practise them for an hour or so every sit down. Or just play around with some random chords for a minute or so, doing nonsensial right hand movements with a simple left hand chord sequence.

Feel free to borrow chord sequences from songs you hear and like, it'll get you into improv, something which is useful to have when you don't have sheet music or want to get into composing. Good luck on your playing Justin, don't give up
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Old 2009-04-04, 11:36   Link #133
christine_cute
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Wow......so many piano players here....

Well i play guitar and I am presently learing violin(got inspired by some animes^^)
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Old 2009-04-04, 13:42   Link #134
Chaho-Chi
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I Play Double Bass and Piano, and i know some Violin


I hope im not the only one that has the temptaion to do a vibato when my hands are free....
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Old 2009-04-04, 13:49   Link #135
Nosauz
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well i play piano, clarinet, bass clarinet, and the vibes and currently i'm trying to pick up the guitar but i've seem to have lost some of the drive to play my lonely guitar.
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Old 2009-04-04, 13:50   Link #136
Justin Kim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClockWorkAngel View Post
@Justin

You should probably get into scales again, if only to help with the warming up. However the theory there is wonderful (Something I've only recently realized) and will help with your playing alot. Do chromatics, for goof fingering and muscle strength.

I started when I was 7, stopped my lessons at 14. However half a year in, I somehow revived my will to play. It hasn't been until recently that I've actually began to accelerate my learning faster than ever.

Play hard songs, that's the best way to get back into it, even if you struggle through every bar, play it, again and again, make sure you like the song By the way or you'll never finish it.

Get into Jazz or improvisation, once you've played long enough the successive chords will just come to you, even if they're just simple chords.

The most important thing is motivation, and heart! If you love the piano it'll come back to you without a worry. Just play songs you love, and practise them for an hour or so every sit down. Or just play around with some random chords for a minute or so, doing nonsensial right hand movements with a simple left hand chord sequence.

Feel free to borrow chord sequences from songs you hear and like, it'll get you into improv, something which is useful to have when you don't have sheet music or want to get into composing. Good luck on your playing Justin, don't give up
T_T Thank you for your words of encouragement. Lol, it's really sad to see all these hard pieces I once used to play all scattered about my piano. In fact, they look intimidating these days.
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Old 2009-04-04, 16:19   Link #137
StarsMending
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I play the harp, as it's my favorite instrument. I also play (rather poorly) the cello, and am hoping to learn the piano in the future!

There are a lot of musicians here!
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Old 2009-04-04, 17:56   Link #138
Justin Kim
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Did my topic / post "topic" get changed on behalf of the community? Just curious O_o, kind of noticed it did.
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Old 2009-04-04, 20:54   Link #139
chikorita157
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In addition to Piano, I used to play the Clarinet since 4th grade all the way through high school. I could play it well, but I'm a bit week in some areas, espcially when I played fast temp pieces in concert band.
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Old 2009-04-04, 20:57   Link #140
Nosauz
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did you ever have to go to all concert auditions? one of the worst experiences ever, my friend who also played the clarinet would psych out the competition by burning flight of the bumblebee twice its tempo with his insane tongueing while others warmed up for their auditions,while he was first chair all state i usually was like 2nd chair second clarinet. Any way those things were some of the worst experiences I had with band... sigh
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