AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2009-06-17, 01:06   Link #2441
ACGalaga
Member
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Nabari
Send a message via AIM to ACGalaga Send a message via Skype™ to ACGalaga
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiga View Post
What's the little ヶ for? I saw it in the middle of a name recently and was like, "Wait, wut?" It looks like a small katakana ke but...
I'm not sure of all the uses for ヶ, but I also see it in town names. For example: 百合ケ丘 and 南ヶ丘. Here it is pronounced "GA" (Yurigaoka and minamigaoka). It roughly translates to "Lilly of the Hill" or "South of the Hill."
__________________
ACGalaga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-17, 01:40   Link #2442
Kudryavka
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Thanks, Mystique.
I wonder what grade level reading the Shana novel series is. Any one know? Viz Media tore out my heart and smashed it into itty bitty pieces when they canceled their translations. :'(
Kudryavka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-17, 04:25   Link #2443
Circular Logic
土は幻に
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komari View Post
Thanks, Mystique.
I wonder what grade level reading the Shana novel series is. Any one know? Viz Media tore out my heart and smashed it into itty bitty pieces when they canceled their translations. :'(
High. It'll be tough going even if you're past JLPT 2. If you can take the time and effort to grind through it however, your Japanese will improve astronomically.
Circular Logic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-17, 09:22   Link #2444
Doraneko
The Owl of Minerva
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
The problem of Shana is that it has too many obscure kanji terms created by the author that would leave even native Japanese scratching their heads. At least you can find an elaborated lexicon (in Japanese of course) on the web.

Once you have gotten used to them (which will probably take some time btw), Shana is not much different from other light novels. Just like other light novels, there are furigana for kanji outside the jouyou list. Japanese beginners and intermediate learners should find them very helpful.

I would recommend it if you have been regularly reading light novels in Japanese, regardless of your JLPT level. (I have some JLPT3 friends who can read most light novels incl. Shana with no difficulty). But if this is your first Japanese novel, then even a JLPT1 pass can't be of much help.
Doraneko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-17, 09:35   Link #2445
Doughnuts
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: England
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiga View Post
Was wondering if it was an irregular. I thought only suru and kuru (and the negative of aru) were irregular (and desu, but the site I'm using treats that one separately). Don't think the lesson would have left it out, so I probably just forgot... oh well, thanks.
other than the -ta/-ta form, iku is treated like any other -ku verb, so it's only semi-irregular. Most teaching material won't teach it seperately, but will probably highlight it when discussing the -te form.
Doughnuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-19, 06:56   Link #2446
ACGalaga
Member
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Nabari
Send a message via AIM to ACGalaga Send a message via Skype™ to ACGalaga
Ok, here's another. I think it's correct, but I'd love to hear your opinions on my Japanese.

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/1397/4koma9panel.jpg

This 4koma only has one panel of Japanese. The rest is English.

Thanks
__________________
ACGalaga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-19, 22:40   Link #2447
Raiga
tl;dr
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Age: 23
How do you tell the difference between 五日 and 何時か in spoken Japanese? I mean, I know the answer would usually be "context," but since they both refer to time, is there any more specific way? How can you tell, for example, if someone's saying "I'll do this in five days" vs. "I'll do this sometime."

(odd, the encoding on 五日 is going weird... the 五 shows up fine in the post reply/edit field, but doesn't show up once I've submitted the reply... and I tried Unicode and all three of the Japanese encodings in the menu... even tried typing the five in Chinese... :\ )
__________________
Raiga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-20, 05:43   Link #2448
Mystique
Honyaku no Hime
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: In the eastern capital of the islands of the rising suns...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiga View Post
How do you tell the difference between 五日 and 何時か in spoken Japanese? I mean, I know the answer would usually be "context," but since they both refer to time, is there any more specific way? How can you tell, for example, if someone's saying "I'll do this in five days" vs. "I'll do this sometime."

(odd, the encoding on 五日 is going weird... the 五 shows up fine in the post reply/edit field, but doesn't show up once I've submitted the reply... and I tried Unicode and all three of the Japanese encodings in the menu... even tried typing the five in Chinese... :\ )
五日 【いつか】 (n) five days, the fifth day (of the month), (P)
何時か 【いつか】 (adv) (uk) sometime, someday, one day, some time or other, the other day, in due course, in time

*snickers*
I read 何時か as 'nan ji ka' (what time is it?) - i've a feeling a few natives would read it that way too >.>

Itsuka = someday is an adverb, a definite one I tend to often use myself.
Meaning it's normally at the start of the sentence followed by a verb, for example
いつか、日本語で綺麗に小説を絶対読めますよ!
itsuka, nihongo de, kirei ni shousetsu wo zettai yomemasu yo!
Someday, I'll definitely be able to read a novel in Japanese well.

As for the counter '5 days', you'll hear it in context I'm afraid. xD
It'll be an answer when talking about time, planning, counting down something.

後何日?
五日です。
How many days left?
Five.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACGalaga View Post
Ok, here's another. I think it's correct, but I'd love to hear your opinions on my Japanese.

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/1397/4koma9panel.jpg

This 4koma only has one panel of Japanese. The rest is English.

Thanks
My 'advice'
Either pick 'super' or 'mecha', but using both is kinda overkill xD
I don't know if you're making Alan deliberately bad in Japanese, otherwise I'd suggest you try 超元気だよ!(chou genki da yo)
Which could be just as amusing
__________________

Worrying is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere. - Van Wilder
"If you ain't laughin', you ain't livin'." - Carlos Mencia
Mystique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-20, 06:15   Link #2449
Doughnuts
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: England
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiga View Post
How do you tell the difference between 五日 and 何時か in spoken Japanese? I mean, I know the answer would usually be "context," but since they both refer to time, is there any more specific way? How can you tell, for example, if someone's saying "I'll do this in five days" vs. "I'll do this sometime."

(odd, the encoding on 五日 is going weird... the 五 shows up fine in the post reply/edit field, but doesn't show up once I've submitted the reply... and I tried Unicode and all three of the Japanese encodings in the menu... even tried typing the five in Chinese... :\ )
There's a small difference in pronunciation, involving the so called "pitch accent".

In a Tokyoan accent, 何時か is spoken with a high first syllable, with the rest low, and 五日 is the opposite, starting low, with a raised accent on the second syllable.

って私の辞典が言ってたぜ
Doughnuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-21, 09:40   Link #2450
ACGalaga
Member
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Nabari
Send a message via AIM to ACGalaga Send a message via Skype™ to ACGalaga
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post

My 'advice'
Either pick 'super' or 'mecha', but using both is kinda overkill xD
I don't know if you're making Alan deliberately bad in Japanese, otherwise I'd suggest you try 超元気だよ!(chou genki da yo)
Which could be just as amusing
Cool! Thanks for the suggestion and feedback!

I think I'm going for the overkill aspect... (there's the high tension comment from the people in the bg) But, I'm going to run 超元気だよ by a few people and get some more thoughts.
__________________
ACGalaga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-22, 09:33   Link #2451
RandomGuy
ここに居ってんねん
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Osaka
Age: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACGalaga View Post
I'm not sure of all the uses for ヶ, but I also see it in town names. For example: 百合ケ丘 and 南ヶ丘. Here it is pronounced "GA" (Yurigaoka and minamigaoka). It roughly translates to "Lilly of the Hill" or "South of the Hill."
Not quite. "Ga" is an archaic possessive marker that functions more or less the same as the modern "no", which means you've got those translations reversed. "Yurigaoka" is "Lily Hill" and "Minamigaoka" means "Southern Hill".

FWIW, you might also see it as a plain old hiragana が, or (as sometimes happens in place names) only represented in the pronunciation, and not the official spelling.
RandomGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 00:41   Link #2452
mendokusa
めんど草
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: near NAGOYA
Age: 29
Send a message via MSN to mendokusa
はじめまして。
Nice to meet you.

僕は日本人です。(名古屋)
I'm japanese.(NAGAOYA)

僕はあなたがたの日本語の勉強を手伝いたいです。
I wanna help your learning japanese.

m(_ _)m
mendokusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 07:12   Link #2453
Kylaran
A Priori Impossibility
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Age: 24
Send a message via Skype™ to Kylaran
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doraneko View Post
The problem of Shana is that it has too many obscure kanji terms created by the author that would leave even native Japanese scratching their heads. At least you can find an elaborated lexicon (in Japanese of course) on the web.
Reading Nasu Kinoko's Kara no Kyoukai is probably the most exhausting endeavor I've ever attempted in Japanese aside from trying to learn some Edo-period Japanese on my own with just google and a dictionary. XD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
I read 何時か as 'nan ji ka' (what time is it?) - i've a feeling a few natives would read it that way too >.>
I read it as nanjika too, and then I thought to myself: "Wait... These two don't sound alike." >.>;

And yes, as others have said, although the two sound the same, the grammatical usage will allow you to distinguish the difference between the two words. Just as in English, you can tell the difference between "two days" and "too late"; two being a noun and too being an adverb. (I actually had to think about that one for a while. I needed two homophones that were associated with time, and I'll admit that the latter might not carry the same nuanced difference associated with the Japanese. However, I think it's a decent example.)

めんど草さん、

お互いに英語と日本語を勉強しましょう。
Kylaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 08:33   Link #2454
mendokusa
めんど草
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: near NAGOYA
Age: 29
Send a message via MSN to mendokusa
(1)五日頑張れば(、)本を読むことができる。
itsu ka gannbare ba honn wo yomu koto ga dekiru.
(2)いつか(、)頑張れば本を読むことができる
itsuka gannbare ba honn wo yomu koto ga dekiru.

(1) is limited for five days.
not five month,not five hour.
so,"日 ka" is accented most.
itsu(five)-ka(day)

(2) isn't limited.
"itsuka"is an adverb,so "い i" is accented most.
itsuka(sometime)

※"itsuka" is ”何時か”,but there is the pronunciation of both "itsuka" and "nannjika".
it's easy to read,so use "いつか" by many japanese.

Last edited by mendokusa; 2009-06-26 at 11:21.
mendokusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 10:13   Link #2455
RandomGuy
ここに居ってんねん
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Osaka
Age: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mendokusa View Post
はじめまして。
nice to meet you.

僕は日本人です。(名古屋)
i'm japanese.(nagaoya)

僕はあなたがたの日本語の勉強を手伝いたいです。
i wanna help your learning japanese.

M(_ _)m
ほんじゃあ、ニャーニャー言葉名古屋弁教えてくれへん?鳥山先生みたいにしゃべりたいねん!

In all seriousness, though, it's good to see more native speakers in the thread these days. We non-native types appreciate the help.
RandomGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 12:10   Link #2456
mendokusa
めんど草
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: near NAGOYA
Age: 29
Send a message via MSN to mendokusa
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomGuy View Post
ほんじゃあ、ニャーニャー言葉名古屋弁教えてくれへん?鳥山先生みたいにしゃべりたいねん!
名古屋弁
nagoya slang

ほかる(ほうかる)=捨てる
hokaru = suteru
(houkaru)

ゴミをほかっといて!(ゴミを捨てておいて!)
please throw away trash.
mendokusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-26, 16:49   Link #2457
RandomGuy
ここに居ってんねん
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Osaka
Age: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mendokusa View Post
名古屋弁
nagoya slang

ほかる(ほうかる)=捨てる
hokaru = suteru
(houkaru)

ゴミをほかっといて!(ゴミを捨てておいて!)
please throw away trash.
大阪弁とあまり変わらんな。
Not too different from Osaka dialect.

「ほかす」(または「ほる」) = 捨てる
"hokasu" (or "horu") = "suteru"

「それほかしといて。」
"Throw that away."

ちなみに、「ホルモン焼き」の由来は「放る物」や。
By the way, "Horumon-yaki" (a dish of grilled offal) comes from the phrase "the stuff you throw away" (horumon).
RandomGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-28, 05:21   Link #2458
mendokusa
めんど草
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: near NAGOYA
Age: 29
Send a message via MSN to mendokusa
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomGuy View Post
大阪弁とあまり変わらんな。
Not too different from Osaka dialect.
ほかの地域と比べて
大阪と名古屋は近いから、ひどく違っていることはない。
Compared with other area's dialect,
Osaka and Nagoya are near,so difference of their dialect aren't terrible.

えらい(えれえ) =  疲れた、辛い
erai tukareta ,turai
(eree)

えれえなら座りゃあ(疲れたなら座って)
if became tired, sit down.
mendokusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-28, 13:31   Link #2459
Raiga
tl;dr
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Age: 23
Guys I think I broke my IME.

I input おおき and I got this.



(the order of things is messed up because I was playing around trying to fix it)

... isn't that kanji for おおい? Shouldn't it convert to 大き? Yet that's not even on the list...

Er, I don't see why it'd affect it, but I was using my Chinese IME earlier (to look up kanji that I knew the Chinese for, but didn't know the Japanese reading of).
__________________
Raiga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-28, 13:46   Link #2460
Circular Logic
土は幻に
*Fansubber
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
You may want to try 「大きな」 or 「大きい」

You're missing a い if you want to turn おおき into an -i adjective.
Circular Logic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hiragana

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 18:49.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.