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Old 2003-11-12, 06:00   Link #21
Videric
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Stockholm
Age: 27
Sumimasen kimi no pantsu o kudasai ? O_o - Can i have youre panties please
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Old 2003-11-12, 08:18   Link #22
Wandering A.I.
エッチだ! しかたない
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Hmm, I see two requests not done yet. You'd be safer buying a phrase book than
trusting my limited abilities, though. ^^

>"where is someone who speaks english"

As close to the English as I can, although I did use 'can' instead of 'speak' since I
think it works better:
eigo ga dekiru hito wa doko desu ka? ("Where is someone who can do English?")

But I wouldn't be so direct with a stranger, although they might expect it from
a gaijin. If I'm looking for someone who works there who speaks English I guess:
eigo ga dekiru hito wa irasshaimasenka? (basically does someone who can do
English exist, with a polite form of exist)

If I was looking on the street, maybe:
eigo ga dekiru hito wo sagashite iru n desu ga. (a polite way of saying you're
looking for something, although I've only used it for things not people before ^^)

Perhaps:
eigo ga dekiru hito ga doko ni iru no ka oshiete kudasaimasen ka? ("couldn't you
please tell me where a person who can speak English is?" - the longer the more
polite you know ^^ Actually kata might be a more polite version of hito, I'm not
going back and rewriting, though. ;p)

>"my pants are on fire"

Best guess (verb used for a burning spaceship in Wandaba Style, hehehe):
zubon (or jiipan for jeans) ga moete imasu yo!

For some reason that doesn't sound emotional enough, maybe:
zubon ga moete iru no da zo!
zubon ga hajimete moete shimatta!
Hehehe, I give up. ^^

Btw, how come no one has done the classic:
boku wa aisu kurimu wo issho ni taberu hito ga inai no. ("I don't have anyone to
eat ice cream with.")
Let's remember our priorities after all.

Last edited by Wandering A.I.; 2003-11-12 at 10:08.
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Old 2003-11-12, 09:16   Link #23
K_R
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Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tokyo, Japan
--wandering a i
I think if you could trot out
「英語が出来る人はどこにいるのか教えて下さいませんか。」 and know that it's polite form, you don't really need to be asking the question ;)


"Can you speak English?" = 「英語が話せるの。」 "eigo ga hanaseru no." Very casual, but apppropriate if you are young and are addressing someone who is similarly young. (but would being able to use this level of casual speech mean that you know enough Japanese as is...)
You could be a bit more polite and say 「英語が話せいますか。」 "eigo ga hanase imasuka."

oh, and you can drop the 「僕は」 from your last sentence, it's superfluous.

--koji150

「今日は、お元気ですか。」 "konnichiha, ogenki desuka." would be more appropriate/polite. 'oi' is more of an attention getter than a greeting. If it's before 10AM, you should use 「おはようございます」. And you wouldn't ask 「お元気ですか。」 to someone you see frequently. And don't forget to bow, the depth of your bow will depend on your social standing with the other person. But, you already know that...


trivia note: ecchi is the jp pronunciation of H, which is the abbreviation of hentai. It's essentially the same thing, but ecchi has a slightly less severe connotation.
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Old 2003-11-12, 23:54   Link #24
koji150
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K_R
「今日は、お元気ですか。」 "konnichiha, ogenki desuka." would be more appropriate/polite. 'oi' is more of an attention getter than a greeting.
I know, but I was thinking of the shortest, most informal way. Like you would use with friends. But yes, that would be more appropriate just meeting someone.
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Old 2003-11-13, 02:43   Link #25
K_R
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Maybe with friends, you could just use 「うす。元気?」
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Old 2003-11-15, 01:24   Link #26
Kobugodo
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(O)kane = Money
Denwa = Phone
Sakana = Fish
Ocha = Tea (any)
Koocho = Tea (black)
ryokucha = Tea (green)
pan = bread
Tamago = egg
ringo = apple
Terebi = Television
Kuma = bear
kuma no nuigurumi = teddy bear
tadashi = but, however
sore = that
sore de = then
sore dewa = and then
sore to mo = or
umi = sea, ocean
ame = rain
mizu = water
soro soro = soon, now
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Old 2003-11-15, 08:57   Link #27
Keops
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Maracaibo, Venezuela
Age: 30
Help with some japanese

Hello.

I'm not sure if this is the proper forum to ask this, but I think so ^^

I know one work for thunder in japanese is kaminari, but then, what does raigeki mean? I'm almost sure it also means thunder or perhaps lightning. The other question is about a simple sentence. I know that shiawase stands for happiness, and I also understand the use of the no particle... Then I suppose saying "Keops' happiness" would be Keops no shiawase, right? Correct me if I'm wrong.

Well, thanks in advance for the help. It's very appreciated ^_~
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Old 2003-11-15, 10:01   Link #28
Xeno
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Age: 26
If the word raigeki being with 来 then it is the next(something) such as the word raishuu, I checked my dictionary, and the only word for geki I found, is drama or a play. I'm not sure if the japanese combine their words in such ways, as I am still learning, however, if they do it that way, it could mean the next play.
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Old 2003-11-15, 10:25   Link #29
[Titan]
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Join Date: Mar 2003
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Age: 30
I tried writing raigeki using japanese input, and I came up with 雷撃
the first part (雷 ) means "thunder, booming sound in the air created during stormy weather " according to babylon.com
the second part (撃 ) means "poke, push "

hope that helps a bit ^_^

[edit]
according to babelfish, 雷撃 combined means "torpedo attack"
however, 雷 means thunder, and 撃 means attack.

Strange fellows, those japanese


[edit2]
If I write "kaminari" with japanese inpu, it comes up with 雷. so I guess the pronunciaton of 雷 changes if it is used in combination with 撃
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Old 2003-11-30, 12:55   Link #30
gravitation
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YO! i was wondering how you say "Im learning Japanese" in japanese, i am learning japanese so i dont need a long speech or explanation etc, incase your wondering i would like to know how to say this coz i go to this japanese restraunt with my aunt alot and they speak japanese, i would like to have a short convo with em ^_^
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Old 2003-11-30, 13:27   Link #31
Lord Raiden
Uber Coffee for da win!
 
 
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hehe. What I do when seeing a person who might be German, I open with "Sprechen Sie Deutsch?" or "Do you speak German?" in english. If you get a funny look from the person, they probubly don't speak german and you go on about your business. If they do speak german, they usually reply with "Ja spreche ich Deutsch" (yes, I speak german) and the conversation takes off from there. Should work just as well for Japanese. If you want to, first ask if they speak japanese, then if they do, say you are learning it and want to practice it a bit by speaking to them in japanese. IF you're working with an instructor, have them help you with ways like this to kick of a conversation. I'm just kicking off my learning session in Japanese too, so I can't help you on the translation, but my suggestion for how to start a conversation should work.
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Old 2003-11-30, 13:29   Link #32
gravitation
Don't use animesuki now..
 
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Age: 24
lol thanx lord raiden ^_^ good idea...wat i plan on doing is ordering my food in japanese and then asking how they are or summin lol
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Old 2003-11-30, 14:23   Link #33
Shinta144
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Lol, I remember what it was like being crap at speaking Japanese before..

A little hint.. books and internet are good for beggining to learning Japanese. But if you really want to learn how to speak Japanese fluently.. find someone to teach you.. and watch plenty of anime to help you pick up on Japanese pronounciation.. ^^;;

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Old 2003-12-01, 01:40   Link #34
kazusa
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Hey guys!
*hehe* i don't mean to insult or anything but i find it so hilarious how people around the world want to learn japanese just because of the influence of anime and food. ^ ^
well, ask away if you guys have a request because i'm japanese and am 100% fluent. I'll be happy to answer any questions.
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Old 2003-12-01, 03:54   Link #35
kj1980
kaii~...kana? kana?
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gravitation
YO! i was wondering how you say "Im learning Japanese" in japanese, i am learning japanese so i dont need a long speech or explanation etc, incase your wondering i would like to know how to say this coz i go to this japanese restraunt with my aunt alot and they speak japanese, i would like to have a short convo with em ^_^
Most informal way would be 「わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい!」

Or you could be boring and say 「私は日本語を習っています」
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Old 2003-12-01, 07:04   Link #36
Oneesama
本當に愛してるなら, "鰻食べる?ってきかないで
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by kj1980
Most informal way would be 「わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい!」

Or you could be boring and say 「私は日本語を習っています」
would be nice if it's in romanji rather than kanji.... thinking most people cant realli read kanji ^^ onegai~

わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい! = washa, nihongo o naraa torunjyai.

私は日本語を習っています = watashi wa nihogo o naraa teimasu.

p.s. correct me if i am wrong ^^

edit: typo~
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Old 2003-12-01, 21:39   Link #37
kazusa
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Um... this --> わしゃ、日本語を習っとるんじゃい! isn't only informal but it's a different dialect, it's the style of language a grandpa uses, and it's actually rude... learning that wouldn't be very smart.
私は日本語を習っています is correct as the previous threads mentioned.
Again... I don't want to be rude but it's better not to learn Japanese from anime ^ ^;
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Old 2003-12-03, 16:50   Link #38
Lord Raiden
Uber Coffee for da win!
 
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Middle of insanity
Hey, as a side note, I forgot this by now, but what are the uses for things like sama, sempai, kun, chan, etc. The little suffixes that go onto the end of names. What's the proper usage of those?
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Old 2003-12-03, 16:53   Link #39
Lord Raiden
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EDIT: Ah, double post. Please delete. Thanks.
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Old 2003-12-03, 18:50   Link #40
kazusa
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Alright, when you use sama at the end of a name [usually last name] it means that you pay that person great respect or that they're an important figure. This isn't really used anymore but there are times where a housemaid or employee may refer to the head male as "danna-sama." The head female would be called "oku-sama." The two words both generally mean either "mister" and "missus" or "husband" and "wife."

Senpai is used only for people that are in your school and are older than you. No matter who it is that is older than you, you use "senpai" even if that person is your friend. Unless that person is REALLY REALLY close to you, you don't ever call older schoolmates by their names. I used to think it was ok to call those older than you by just their names if they were friends but people started thinking I was disrespectful in Japan so... yeah ^ ^;

kun is put at the end of a guy's name. If you are just classmates or acquaintances with that male you would use the last name [for example yamashita] and add the "kun" making it Yamashita-kun. If you are pretty good friends with that person then you may use the first name [for example Takashi] making it Takashi-kun.

san is very flexible but is generally used for respect. You usually add this at the end of a last name also. San is the most widely used so if you bumped into a stranger, meet a business associate, go for a job interview, you will refer to the person by their last name with "san." So Yamashita-san [business associate], Kamakura-san [person that's helping you choose your clothes in the store].
San is also used in school. San is usually used with anybody that you particularly respect. Maybe a senpai or a regular classmate that you respect more than just a schoolmate; that's when you can also use it. So, just like "kun" you use "san" with girl's names [i.e. Takeda-san & Emi-san].

chan is used with a girl's name and is generally a very casual term. Girl's will use this with other's girl's names at any age but boy's usually don't use this name past the age of about 12. This is rarely put with a last name so when you use it, always put it at the end of a girl's first name.

Those are the basics.

Last edited by kazusa; 2003-12-03 at 19:00.
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