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Old 2003-12-03, 19:16   Link #41
luckme10
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Oh can someone translate this to japanese?
Where is the bathroom?
Why are your toliets all f*&^Ed up?
May I have some money?

in spanish that translates to without the accents because i don't have the right style keyboard atm.

Donde esta el bano?
Por que el vater es muy malo?
DINERO!(holds gun up to their chest)
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:21   Link #42
kazusa
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Where is the bathroom? = Ote-arai wa dokodesuka?
May I have some money? = Okane oh kudasai

I wouldn't mind translating the other one but I need to know if that's supposed to be in "yakuza" sort of roughness or regular talk. It's hard to translate anyway though because the Japanese language doesn't really have cuss/swear words.
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:30   Link #43
luckme10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazusa
Where is the bathroom? = Ote-arai wa dokodesuka?
May I have some money? = Okane oh kudasai

I wouldn't mind translating the other one but I need to know if that's supposed to be in "yakuza" sort of roughness or regular talk. It's hard to translate anyway though because the Japanese language doesn't really have cuss/swear words.
NO swear words?!? How do they vent?? I mean i couldn't go a day without saying "YOu mother f&*^#ing Cock S(&*^ing GodD(*^n SonaB*^&Ch!.
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:31   Link #44
tsurumaru
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Thanks Kazusa, that was pretty useful. Any chance of a short guide to informal male/female sentence endings? yo, ze, zo, wa etc

It always made me laugh when I was working in a bar in Japan that the French Bartender there could speak almost fluent "yakuza dialect" nihongo (he had a pretty good accent too), but almost no polite form (whereas I was the otherway round - Damn Berlitz book ). Also my Japanese colleagues said most of the Gaijin who learnt Japanese from their girlfriends ended up sounding like girls..... ^^:

Also when I hand over my money to a cashier what is the verb they say I cant quite catch it but its something like "Hai ni sen en wo wazenkarimasu" Hmm thats probably not it at all! Gomen ne!
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:32   Link #45
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well i cant see the 3rd page so im gonna post coz that usually fixes it ^_^

EDIT there we go^_^

lol im sure they have swear words in japanese just not as much as us lol ^_^

Kazusa or anyone, can ya tell me about the different dialects coz i dont really understand what dialects are at the mo


o yeah no probs tsurumaru ^_^
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:33   Link #46
tsurumaru
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gravitation
well i cant see the 3rd page so im gonna post coz that usually fixes it ^_^
Thanks Gravitation!
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Old 2003-12-03, 19:38   Link #47
luckme10
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hmm we should go offer there and offer a japanese to ebonics course. You know? So they can speak english the correct way!
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Old 2003-12-03, 20:49   Link #48
Go-lytely
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Yeah, can someone tell me more about Tohoku-ben. I've been able to recognize most kansai-ben since I hear it a lot in anime, but the other dialects I have a hard time picking up on.
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:20   Link #49
kazusa
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Ok tsurumaru, regarding slang endings... there are none.
Zo, yo and ze are just endings you add on to make your sentences sound jazzier or more laid back. They aren't endings like "san" or "kun" or "chan" to name a few.
Hm... it's really hard to explain HOW to use them but I'll try my best.

"Zo" and "ze" generally have the same effect on a sentence and from my memory [shifts through mind and tests with various verbs] it works with almost any sentence except one-word remarks like... "TOILET!" when you need the toilet ^ ^;
These attachments are usually only used by MALES so females, unless you want to be tomboyish [otemba = tomboy in japanese if you wanted to know], don't use these.
Well, if you wanted to say "I'm going to punch if you say that again" you and a "zo" [Mou ikkai ittara punchi suru ZO]. So in other words it can be used as a playful threat if attached to a positive sentence. If the sentence is negative "Kane kurenai ZO" it makes the sentence mean "he/she/it won't give money."
Argh, so hard to explain... this is the best I can do.

"yo" is the same as those up above but for girls.

All 3 of these attachments are USUALLY ok with any sentence considering those conditions but there are certain cases where they just don't work. I believe that the only way you can tell the cases apart is just by memorization. So if you wanted to add it, better to check a book or someone before using it.

Hm... as for different dialects...
Dialects are languages that are native to only a certain region in Japan. For example, Osaka-ben would be a dialect native to Osaka and certain other cities that surround Osaka like Kyoto. [A lot of Kyoto speaks Osaka-ben too].
That's what a dialect is.
I'm partly from Tokyo and partly from Osaka so I know Osaka-ben but I don't know any of the others like Nagoya-ben, Kawachi-ben, Hakata-ben, Tohoku-ben, etc. [there are too many too count since there are so many prefectures ^ ^;].
Some common dialects or forms of speaking that we use that are considered the universal dialects are hyohjungo and teineigo.
Hyojungo is the most common and that's usually what you learn in the Japanese schools within the country and outside the country.
Teineigo which, literally translated, means "proper language" and this is a very, very polite way of speaking. It's pretty difficult to master this language actually because there's a very fine line between teineigo and hyojungo. Some native speakers don't even master it so don't worry if you can't speak it. If you want an example of teineigo you should listen to Tohru from Fruits Basket. She speaks it perfectly from how much of it I know. And obvious, hyojungo is available in almost every anime you watch.

If you want to learn some Osaka-ben, just put up a post about it ^ ^
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:33   Link #50
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i wouldnt mind learning some osaka-ben but would you be able to explain the whole dialects thing to me lol coz im still a little confused...why are there so many of these dialects etc ?^_^ thanx
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:41   Link #51
kazusa
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Hm... WHY are there so many dialects?
*haha* that's actually a hard question to answer gravitation. There just are. I mean... it's like that with almost every Asian country. In China there are different dialects, respective to their cities such as Shanghai Mandarin, Beijing Mandarin etc.
In the Phillippines there's tagalog and then there are other smaller languages.
I suppose I can use England [since that's where you're from gravitation] as an example.
Alright, so in London you have one type of British accent but that accent may change if you go down to say... Chester. Both cities may speak the same English but it just sounds different. If we take various "dialects" of English [although there are no real different dialects, they're just different] there's British English, Irish English, and American English and many more. They're all the same language but just different styles of how it's used.
The British may refer to the big thing on the road as a lorry while Americans call it a truck. British say rubbish bin while Americans say trash can. That's one way of seeing it.
Dialects in Asia are different on a bigger scale but the main concept is the same. Different dialects just develop because of different environments that people grow up in. Usually the city controls the universal dialect and then the countryside ends up having different styles all because of the whole migration back way back when.
You know, people from China and Korea tried to escape their country and they ended up settling from Japan etc.

I hope that makes sense... ^ ^;
Sorry if it doesn't, I tried my best ><
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:41   Link #52
kj1980
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gravitation
i wouldnt mind learning some osaka-ben but would you be able to explain the whole dialects thing to me lol coz im still a little confused...why are there so many of these dialects etc ?^_^ thanx
It's sorta like how you guys have different dialects. I assume people who speak English on the (American) West Coast have a different intonnation from people in the South, from people in the Mid-East, to people on the East Coast. Then, there is also different forms of English spoken in Ireland, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. Then there is the slight difference of English in Afrikaans spoken in South Africa, and Dutch in Netherlands.

It's kinda like that (I assume).


Any language is hard to explain. The best way to learn a new language is to speak it on an everyday basis. That's how I learned English...which I take pride in, coming from a Japanese immersed society.
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:42   Link #53
kj1980
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つーか、同じ時に返事してるし(笑)
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Old 2003-12-03, 21:47   Link #54
gravitation
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Quote:
Hm... WHY are there so many dialects?
*haha* that's actually a hard question to answer gravitation. There just are. I mean... it's like that with almost every Asian country. In China there are different dialects, respective to their cities such as Shanghai Mandarin, Beijing Mandarin etc.
In the Phillippines there's tagalog and then there are other smaller languages.
I suppose I can use England [since that's where you're from gravitation] as an example.
Alright, so in London you have one type of British accent but that accent may change if you go down to say... Chester. Both cities may speak the same English but it just sounds different. If we take various "dialects" of English [although there are no real different dialects, they're just different] there's British English, Irish English, and American English and many more. They're all the same language but just different styles of how it's used.
The British may refer to the big thing on the road as a lorry while Americans call it a truck. British say rubbish bin while Americans say trash can. That's one way of seeing it.
Dialects in Asia are different on a bigger scale but the main concept is the same. Different dialects just develop because of different environments that people grow up in. Usually the city controls the universal dialect and then the countryside ends up having different styles all because of the whole migration back way back when.
You know, people from China and Korea tried to escape their country and they ended up settling from Japan etc.

I hope that makes sense... ^ ^;
Sorry if it doesn't, I tried my best ><
LOL it made perfect sense ^_^ thanx
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Old 2003-12-03, 23:01   Link #55
Lord Raiden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kj1980
It's sorta like how you guys have different dialects. I assume people who speak English on the (American) West Coast have a different intonnation from people in the South, from people in the Mid-East, to people on the East Coast. Then, there is also different forms of English spoken in Ireland, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. Then there is the slight difference of English in Afrikaans spoken in South Africa, and Dutch in Netherlands.

It's kinda like that (I assume).


Any language is hard to explain. The best way to learn a new language is to speak it on an everyday basis. That's how I learned English...which I take pride in, coming from a Japanese immersed society.
Yeah, I know what you mean. I live in America, but I'd say we have over 150 official and 500+ unofficial dialects in this country if you will ranging from New Yorker (oh gads is that ever a fun one) to Southern, to East Coast, Northerner, Michiganer (yes, my state has its own form of english. hehe) texan, central us, west cost, northern west coast, alaskan, hawaiian, and of course the cultural versions of english coming from people of other countries like Ireland, Deutschland...er, Germany (opps), spanish, and many others. So don't feel bad. I may have lived in this country for 31 years, but if I go out of state, I tend to find that people tend to pick up different ways of saying things very easily.
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Old 2003-12-04, 01:05   Link #56
zalas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Raiden
Yeah, I know what you mean. I live in America, but I'd say we have over 150 official and 500+ unofficial dialects in this country if you will ranging from New Yorker (oh gads is that ever a fun one) to Southern, to East Coast, Northerner, Michiganer (yes, my state has its own form of english. hehe) texan, central us, west cost, northern west coast, alaskan, hawaiian, and of course the cultural versions of english coming from people of other countries like Ireland, Deutschland...er, Germany (opps), spanish, and many others. So don't feel bad. I may have lived in this country for 31 years, but if I go out of state, I tend to find that people tend to pick up different ways of saying things very easily.
Except for a few vocabulary differences, most of the dialect differences in America consist of pronunciation. Japanese dialects also vary in written form too, and constructs often change into different words all together (nai -> hen, etc).
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Old 2003-12-04, 08:26   Link #57
ky_khor
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question

what is the word
"what are u saying?!!!!!" (angry)

sounds like "nan da stay"

....... used by Asuka, Naruto.....
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Old 2003-12-04, 12:04   Link #58
zalas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ky_khor
what is the word
"what are u saying?!!!!!" (angry)

sounds like "nan da stay"

....... used by Asuka, Naruto.....
I believe it's nan desu te, and please don't crosspost.
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Old 2003-12-04, 13:22   Link #59
wao
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For the people who don't already know, http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/cgi-bi...jwb/wwwjdic?1C <- That is a rather helpful online dictionary.

However, if you are not sure about verb conjugations you may not get a good answer - for example if you hear "omoidashita" on TV, and you search for it you'll get something not what you're looking for. What you should actually search for is "omoidasu" - but not everyone knows that just like that. Also it's not as helpful if you don't learn hiragana - but trust me its worth learning, and quite easy too.

Interestingly, the phrase "Daijoubu" in Japanese has the kanji 大丈夫 which, in Chinese, means "big husband".
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Old 2003-12-04, 13:43   Link #60
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大丈夫 which, in Chinese, means "big husband".
LOL!!!
Quote:
omoidashita" on TV, and you search for it you'll get something not what you're looking for
yeah your rite, you have to look for whats called the "dictionary form" i think ^_^ the dashita part sets the tense doesnt it? (i know about masen and mashita etc) but what does dashita do?!
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