AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2004-10-19, 10:20   Link #61
eean
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Kirksville, MO, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliganj
Aside from forcing them into a democracy (probably our most successful regime change ) and that whole bit about how they can't start a conflict of any kind on foreign soil for any reason or they are instantly guilty of breaking the treaty, and several war crimes charges as well. That's why they don't have an 'army', 'navy' or 'air force', rather they have the 'self defense force', 'naval defense forse' and 'air defense force'. Furthermore, any planes possessed by the Japanese military are severely restricted in range capabilities.

All because of the insanely restrictive treaty we imposed upon them after WWII, although, admitedly, it wasn't nearly as bad as the one the allies forced on Germany after WWI.
It's part of their constitution and they can change it at any time. Germany was forced to sign a treaty for WWI.

Well, I didn't use Google but went to Wikipedia, which is kind of cheating. Regardless, you could've found this fairly easily. Or payed attention in class.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article...ution_of_Japan
eean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-10-19, 22:24   Link #62
hooliganj
Team Player
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by eean
It's part of their constitution and they can change it at any time. Germany was forced to sign a treaty for WWI.

Well, I didn't use Google but went to Wikipedia, which is kind of cheating. Regardless, you could've found this fairly easily. Or payed attention in class.
I live in the US, no class that I was ever in discussed the reconstruction in Japan. However, through my continued self-education (i.e. I read a lot of books) I am aware that the current Japanese constitution was authored almost entirely by American interests. This isn't really surprising, we beat them in a huge war and occupied their country, a certain amount of influence was bound to be exerted.

And yes, Japan did sign a treaty. If you think 'occupied' is too strong a term for it, then you should try broadening your sources a little. The Potsdam Declaration and The Terms of Surrender. While neither is as harsh as Germany's treaty at the end of WWI, Japan didn't exactly get away with anything. The allies agreed that perhaps driving a defeated nation to despair was not the best way to handle things.
hooliganj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-10-26, 13:26   Link #63
eean
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Kirksville, MO, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliganj
I live in the US, no class that I was ever in discussed the reconstruction in Japan. However, through my continued self-education (i.e. I read a lot of books) I am aware that the current Japanese constitution was authored almost entirely by American interests. This isn't really surprising, we beat them in a huge war and occupied their country, a certain amount of influence was bound to be exerted.
Ha, well most 11th grade US history classes at least get to nuclear cloud and Sept 2, 1945 (which is my birthday minus some decades, why I know this date) and make comparisions to the end of WWI. Though I know some classes start so early in US history they're lucky to make it to WWI.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooliganj
And yes, Japan did sign a treaty. If you think 'occupied' is too strong a term for it, then you should try broadening your sources a little. The Potsdam Declaration and The Terms of Surrender. While neither is as harsh as Germany's treaty at the end of WWI, Japan didn't exactly get away with anything. The allies agreed that perhaps driving a defeated nation to despair was not the best way to handle things.
Seems like your run-of-the-mill unconditional surrender. And of course occupied isn't a too strong word for it, that's what it was called. Its true that the Potsdam calls for an end to Japan's war industry. And under terms of surrender, the Empire of Japan agreed to the terms of Potsdam. But it isn't a treaty really (did the US Senate ever ratify the Potsdam Declaration like it would a treaty?), its a declaration. Certainly not anything close to the Treaty of Versailles which listed specifically Germany's obligations and limitations, as well as created the League of Nations.

It should also be noted that pretty quickly due to Cold War priorities the USA was urging Japan to build up its military. The fact that Japan is in Iraq now is due to US pressure as it's largely againist the will of the people of Japan.
eean is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:04.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
We use Silk.