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Old 2012-09-11, 17:18   Link #2421
NoemiChan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Most people tend to just wash their hair, given how people usually take a bath in the evening. Unless you're like me who is a shower person.
That's why she smells good.. *sniff

..That's why Nii-nii goes to school to meet Haruka without taking a morning bath.....
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Old 2012-09-12, 20:48   Link #2422
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 26
As far as I can see, Anime is definitely not a realistic depiction of Japanese family life. The reason parents are so rare in Anime is simply because Parents would get in the way. It's similar in western literature, there's an alarmingly high number of orphans (Luke Skywalker of Star Wars is a case in point, he has no parents, and what parents he has die in the first half hour of the film. He seems to get over it pretty quickly, all things considered).

From what I can see, Japanese families are fairly close, and parents are keen to look after their kids, and in fact I'd say are more likely to overly coddle them then not. For instance, look at all NEETs and hikikomoris living with their parents, the parents usually trying to do their best by their dysfunctional children, when in fact "tough love" might be the best answer.

As an interesting aside, from what I've heard the whole "harsh chinese parenting" thing is also likely a cliché at this point. While there was truth to it in the past (and hey, in the west we had corporal punishment!), it seems today most Chinese parents seem to prefer taking a kinder approach. Apparently popular parenting book titles include "A Good Mother Is Better than a Good Teacher" and "Education of Love".

I recently watched parts of a BBC documentary called "Chinese Schools", while schooling in China is far from perfect (every kid is a young pioneer! Crazy examinations!), the parents on the whole seemed pretty normal. There are some crazy committed parents out there, who make their kids into study machines, but then doesn't that happen everywhere? I knew kids at my school who were studying 5 hours a day (in addition to 9 hours of schooling).

Anyway, I'd say the parenting landscapes in other countries are pretty difficult to describe in only a few paragraphs. But I'd say that there's more variation in parenting style within a country, then there is between countries.
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Old 2012-09-12, 21:47   Link #2423
SaintessHeart
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Study till night was a hit in my Primary and Secondary school days. Some of my foreign friends still don't believe me when I was caned for scoring below 80% in any test or exam, while the local ones thought it was pretty normal other than the caning part : most were just nagged at.

Until the second Gulf War when the economy took a hit, they realised that the cert is more worthless than it looks because you still get sacked if your company doesn't do well. Then they start investing in alternative skills for their kids, for me it was worse off because my dad lost his job and could't afford "alternative skills training" for both his kids - so I started working as a verbal punching bag instead.

Studying till dawn is a ludicrous idea; you can be the best in your field, what if the money flows out of your industry? Being the best makes nonsense when you can't find a job to suit it.
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Old 2012-09-12, 21:55   Link #2424
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Study till night was a hit in my Primary and Secondary school days. Some of my foreign friends still don't believe me when I was caned for scoring below 80% in any test or exam, while the local ones thought it was pretty normal other than the caning part : most were just nagged at.

Until the second Gulf War when the economy took a hit, they realised that the cert is more worthless than it looks because you still get sacked if your company doesn't do well. Ghen they start investing in alternative skills for their kids.
Indeed. Though, from what I've heard, this might be a point of divergence between overseas Chinese and Chinese in China.

I think Immigrants tend to spur their children on much harder. From what I've heard, Irish-Americans back in the day put a lot of pressure on their kids to do well, while I can say with some degree of certainty that that kind of competitive educational culture doesn't really exist in Ireland.

As for the Caning, well, Corporal Punishment is not unique to Asia. My dad had a story where the Christian Brothers hung a boy out of a window by his feet...
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Old 2012-09-12, 22:14   Link #2425
MakubeX2
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From the way the Japanese society and family function, I'm interested in how the parents feel if their children falls into the extreme sides of life as yakuzas, fuzokujous and AV actors. Will the children be disowned or the parents resign to the fact ?
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:03   Link #2426
Sumeragi
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AV: Would the parents know about it, given that it's likely false names would be used?
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:18   Link #2427
MakubeX2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
AV: Would the parents know about it, given that it's likely false names would be used?
Only a matter of time, I believe. As the Chinese saying goes "Paper cannot wrap a fire". Someone will recognize the girl and make the connection.
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:19   Link #2428
Sumeragi
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Meh, I would say there are just too many products for that short of the actor having been originally well-known.
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:27   Link #2429
MakubeX2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Meh, I would say there are just too many products for that short of the actor having been originally well-known.
For a short stint like 5 titles, it might be alright. But for the likes of Yamaguchi sisters and Tsubomi, I don't know.
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:31   Link #2430
Terrestrial Dream
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Speaking of AV

Japan sees surge in aspiring adult film actresses; 6,000 said to debut each year
Quote:
The Japanese sex film, or adult video (AV), industry is big business. It’s said that around 20,000 videos are released annually and some Japanese AV actresses have achieved celebrity status even outside of Japan.

And it’s not just demand for Japanese skin flicks that’s thriving.

According to nonfiction writer Atsuhiko Nakamura, who has published several books based on interviews with AV actresses, the number of Japanese women seeking work in the adult video industry has increased dramatically over the past decade, with some 6,000 girls making their debut every year.

Atsuhiko Nakamura has interviewed over 500 AV actresses and made headlines in Japan for casting light on the dark side of the AV industry with his bestselling book, “Namae no nai Onna-tachi” (“The Nameless Women”).

“Actresses come and go every day and it’s likely that there are about that many [6,000] women in the industry at all times,” explained Nakamura during a recent investigative television program.

“Until the late ‘90s, a lot of people said they wouldn’t appear in an AV even if they were paid 10 million yen, but that rapidly changed over the decade and now normal girls are rushing for a chance to make it into any kind of production.”

While there were always spots open for amateurs in the ‘90s, now it’s said only 15 out of 100 aspiring actresses can get a role and the rest are turned away at the door. It’s just like applying for a part-time job at a convenience store.”

While the adult video industry is known for being recession-proof, Nakamura points out that not all applicants are in it for the money: “One girl had been working for a major bank for one or two years and had begun to feel unsure if it was the right career choice for her. She likes sex and realized she could be an AV actress, and told me she was really happy with her career change.”

And, despite the nature of the work, a strong academic or educational background is valued by producers when trying to sift through so many applicants. “Girls from top-tier colleges are often chosen over those who have a weak academic background,” said Nakamura. “Those with credentials and a job are also more likely to make the cut, especially teachers and nurses.”

Wait ... so you mean those are actually REAL nurses in “Giant-Breasted Nurse Hell 2!?!?” (actual title)

“Most amateur contracts stipulate a set compensation rate for three videos, two pair and one solo. The rates range from 150,000 to 200,000 yen, 250,000 and 300,000 yen, depending on the applicant’s experience and background.”

However, it seems the 150,000 yen rate makes up 60-70% of contracts and recently, some girls are told that due to low demand they’re only needed for one video and can only be paid half the normal rate, leaving them with a take-home of less than 30,000 yen.
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:35   Link #2431
Sumeragi
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What, Terrestrial Dream..... You changed your avatar?!?!?!

*Faints*
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Old 2012-09-12, 23:40   Link #2432
Terrestrial Dream
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
What, Terrestrial Dream..... You changed your avatar?!?!?!

*Faints*
I had that chibi GaoGaiGar for too long, time to move back to my Ibis.
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Old 2012-09-13, 00:00   Link #2433
willx
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So, speaking of something "sort of" culture related. Back when I was Japan in April, I noticed two things Japanese cuisine related different in North America that surprised me considering I thought I knew a decent amount about the cultural before I went (..I guess I'm easily surprised)

1) Certain restaurants or cuisine types are considered "high end" there vs. being gimmicky and considered cheap in North America - Tempura & Teppanyaki Restaurants

2) Miso soup in Japan is not served at the beginning of a meal but along with the rest of the cooked food. I actually asked the nicer restaurants that I frequent here in Toronto why and was told: "People here are just used to having soup as an appetizer"
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Old 2012-09-13, 00:34   Link #2434
MakubeX2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
This just shows how mainstream porn had become. The stringent requirement means that the studio takes their productions seriously and the actress needs to get involved with her character like a professional does. Acting in porn is not like filming a home sex video now because you need to prepare for the role and put up a good performance.


If you are good, it might actually leads to something better.
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Old 2012-09-13, 00:51   Link #2435
aohige
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Join Date: Jul 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willx View Post
So, speaking of something "sort of" culture related. Back when I was Japan in April, I noticed two things Japanese cuisine related different in North America that surprised me considering I thought I knew a decent amount about the cultural before I went (..I guess I'm easily surprised)

1) Certain restaurants or cuisine types are considered "high end" there vs. being gimmicky and considered cheap in North America - Tempura & Teppanyaki Restaurants

2) Miso soup in Japan is not served at the beginning of a meal but along with the rest of the cooked food. I actually asked the nicer restaurants that I frequent here in Toronto why and was told: "People here are just used to having soup as an appetizer"
It's kinda funny, but the stuff you commonly see as "Japanese food" in US are mostly ones that we don't actually eat very often. Especially sushi.

And likewise, the common everyday food we eat, is almost never seen in US.
Most popular food are like Japanese style curry rice, ramen, gyudon (and other cheap donburi), soba and udon, etc.
But no, EVERY freakin Japanese restaurants here in US are about sushi, tenpura, more sushi, and sushi. WTF.
The restaurant I went near where I live (in US) served 5 pieces of Takoyaki at seven bucks, and small side of yakisoba at eight. Those are supposed to be CHEAP JUNK FOOD for god's sake.
That's like serving french fries and tacos for 7~8 bucks.

Japanese restaurants in the west are absolutely NOT a representation of everyday Japanese meal. Not even close.
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Old 2012-09-13, 00:53   Link #2436
Sumeragi
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The worst part: Why is it that the people running the Japanese restaurants are usually Chinese?
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Old 2012-09-13, 01:02   Link #2437
sneaker
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China is poor and huge => lots of uneducated emigrants that opt for opening restaurants.
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Old 2012-09-13, 01:33   Link #2438
Vexx
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: On the whole, I'd rather be in Kyoto ...
Age: 57
I'm somewhat lucky. We have a dozen or so mom'n'pop Japanese restaurants in my area that are actually run by Japanese and actually do regular Japanese food (though they do sushi as well). A couple even do seasonal dishes popular in Japan. Then we have 3 or 4 what I'd call "hoity" restaurants like aohige describes. Touristy... and unrepresentative.

We have several actual Korean-run Korean restaurants. They're always seem excited to see "da white people" come in. Last time my son and I were in one, we ordered a sampler mix and the owner stood there and talked about each dish, what part of Korea it was from... it was a good thing we didn't have an agenda, but he was entertaining.

On the other hand, the innumerable "teriyaki places" are almost always run by Koreans. Yeah, I can tell the difference in the languages. Often I get sense of "we don't care, just buy it"...

What is a weird experience is I'm starting to see a lot of latino cooks in the "teriyaki" and "kaiten-zushi" places. Some of them are very creative but ... I can see why Japan was thinking about "global sushi rangers" to patrol.
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Old 2012-09-13, 08:05   Link #2439
DonQuigleone
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Personally I don't like Sushi and prefer Ramen and other soups. But to be honest, where I am the Japanese places are simply overpriced with subpar food.

The best ethnic places in Ireland are currently the Kebab joints. There's also a fairly large number of Chinese places, some of which are pretty good. There's also a section of the city that has decent Korean food.

I think the key to good ethnic food is numbers. You need to have a large number of the places crammed into a small area, and so have price competition and competition for food quality. And to get those numbers you need to have large numbers of that ethnic community. Not only because you need those numbers to start restaurants, but also because the best restaurants largely cater to their own community first, and "natives" second. In Ireland there's a lot of Chinese and Arabs, but very few Japanese. That's why our Japanese food is overpriced and subpar, there's not enough competition.

Generally there's a few criteria you should use when evaluating an ethnic restaurant:
1. Decor, the trendier it is, the worse the food will be.
2. Clientele, the greater the proportion of people eating there that are of the ethnicity, the better the food.
3. Competition, If you see the same genre of food being served just across the street, the food and prices will be better.
4. Menu, See a chinese menu with weird dishes almost entirely written in Chinese that's got poorly translated English subtitles? Go for it.

So if you find a lone good looking Japanese place on the trendiest street, filled with trendy 20 something Irish people you're going to get shafted. Instead, go to the ethnic "ghetto", find a dingy Korean place filled Korean old dudes and families, right across the street from 2 or 3 other Korean places where you can barely read the menu, and feel secure that you have probably struck gold.

And the trendiness thing is particularly true. There was a Sichuanese place I used to go to all the time, amazing place, always crowded. It recently switched to a new location and went all "Up market", it's food is now shit. Alas, I never go there any more (now I cook my own!).
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Old 2012-09-13, 08:23   Link #2440
aohige
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So does Ireland also suffer from the British curse of Bad Food Syndrome?

I kid, I kid.
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