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Old 2007-10-11, 16:24   Link #281
Sephi
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Join Date: May 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperlion View Post
Do Japanese really eat rice with their chopstick? I never understood the reason for doing this, other Asian country eat rice with their spoon and yet it seems that Japanese don't.
Uhu everyone in my family(Chinese) i know eat there rice with chopsticks..
I learned how to use chopsticks when i was 17 since it became to embarrassing to ask for a spoon on the rare occasions that i'm with family >.<

And i think most Chinese people just eat with chopsticks. I certainly haven't saw someone in China eat with a spoon when i was on holiday there the last year. And i went to quite a few places from HK to Beijing. All using chopsticks.
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Old 2007-10-11, 16:50   Link #282
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:X I've heard a rumour of them
Does anyone know if it's true that Japanese people want to have a cherrytree (or some kind of tree) in the middle of their livingroom as a sign of wealthiness?
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Old 2007-10-11, 18:38   Link #283
X10A_Freedom
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Does sticky rice mean glutanous? Glutanous rice isn't what the Japanese normally eat.
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Old 2007-10-11, 19:14   Link #284
Rembr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by X10A_Freedom View Post
Does sticky rice mean glutanous? Glutanous rice isn't what the Japanese normally eat.
Japanese rice, or "japonica" is a variety of rice grown in Japan that has a sticky texture unlike other rice.
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Old 2007-10-11, 19:42   Link #285
X10A_Freedom
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Some quick googling tells me Japonica rice is a special kind of brown/red rice. Most Japanese eat white rice and most places (meaning every restaurant/fastfood I've been to) serves white rice.
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Old 2007-10-11, 20:45   Link #286
Rembr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by X10A_Freedom View Post
Some quick googling tells me Japonica rice is a special kind of brown/red rice. Most Japanese eat white rice and most places (meaning every restaurant/fastfood I've been to) serves white rice.
They're polished to the white color.
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Old 2007-10-11, 22:21   Link #287
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Quote:
Originally Posted by X10A_Freedom View Post
Some quick googling tells me Japonica rice is a special kind of brown/red rice. Most Japanese eat white rice and most places (meaning every restaurant/fastfood I've been to) serves white rice.
Japanese style rice are all moderately sticky.
They are not like the drier long ones Chinese uses.

If I remember correctly, Koreans also use rice similar to Japanese, that sticks together well, and easy to eat with chopsticks.
But I'll have to ask a Korean to verify this.

Rice you see in US are often either Chinese, Mexican, or American (western) style long rice, and totally diffrent from the ones Japanese/Koreans use.
California's Kokuho Rose rice is American raised Japanese style rice, and fairly close to the ones Japanese uses.
If you happen to come across one, try it out.
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Old 2007-10-11, 23:23   Link #288
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you guys are making this too difficult. yes japanese rice is sticky. it is a 'short' grain rice. korea, indonesia, singapore, china, etc. use this as the staple food.

in central asia, such as India and maybe EU and US, you tend to find a 'long' grain rice. this would include common wild rice, that is a black and brown rice.

how you cook it does affect the stickyness, but each brand of rice does have its own characteristic 'gluten' or 'starch' exterior. when you rinse the rice underwater you can see this.

uncle ben's rice is for elderly folks because its boiled a long time
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Old 2007-10-12, 02:39   Link #289
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Aye... my wife's (japanese) family views non-sticky rice as some sort of total heresy only surpassed by "unca ben's converted rice" as Ultimate Evil.

We stopped using Kokuho Rice this summer because they switched to a varietal that "tasted like dry paper" to us. After a taste testing spree, the new family rice came down to two brands: Kagamiya and Tamanishiki. The latter edged out a win in the second round. Both didn't seem to be quite as gummy as the losers while retaining stickiness. The Tamanishiki subjectively tasted just a bit better.

Now when we prepare Indian dishes... then the basmati varieties win out... but often the curry we make is 'japanese-style' anyway so the japanese rice gets used.
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Old 2007-10-12, 03:59   Link #290
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I don't have any problems picking cooked standard discount supermarket rice with chopsticks. It sticks well enough.
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Old 2007-10-12, 07:55   Link #291
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Sorry, this may be a little off-topic but... Really?? O_o; The few times in my life I've tried to eat non-sticky rice, the rice just sort of crumbled between the chopsticks.

I've learned that to make the best-tasting rice, I must wash it with genkiness and *love*. If I wash it half-heartedly, it simply doesn't taste as good. It's true! I haven't made rice at all yet since I got here... Though I've recently discovered that bread is a sugoishii snack that's filling enough to substitute for breakfasts and lunches. <3

Kagamiya... *snorks*
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Old 2007-10-12, 09:04   Link #292
Slice of Life
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Quote:
Sorry, this may be a little off-topic but... Really?? O_o; The few times in my life I've tried to eat non-sticky rice, the rice just sort of crumbled between the chopsticks.
Maybe we just have a different understanding of "having no problems"? It's not that I'm native with chopsticks so it of course always was and always will be easier for me to eat my meal with a fork in my left and a knife in my right. Plus, I don't cook my rice in bags as Uncle Ben would but with exactly the amount of water it needs. Maybe that makes a difference?
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Old 2007-10-19, 06:35   Link #293
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I might be going to kyoto to take some entrance examination next year, is there any particular things i should look out for?

In schools, does students really address their seniors as xxx-senpai? Well we dont usually address our seniors as "senior" isnt it? Is it too formal to address new classmate by "family-name"-san? Or should i address them by their "given-name"-san right away?

well being too formal, this 慇懃無礼 term comes in right? (well i guess since im not excalty using keigo, this wouldnt be the case right?) ok this is getting really lame, i seriously keep to brush up my language and conversation.

Oh yeah the other thing is that, my language teacher keep emphasize on me that i shouldnt use ore. is that really that rude?
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Old 2007-10-19, 16:58   Link #294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pell14 View Post
I might be going to kyoto to take some entrance examination next year, is there any particular things i should look out for?

In schools, does students really address their seniors as xxx-senpai? Well we dont usually address our seniors as "senior" isnt it? Is it too formal to address new classmate by "family-name"-san? Or should i address them by their "given-name"-san right away?

well being too formal, this 慇懃無礼 term comes in right? (well i guess since im not excalty using keigo, this wouldnt be the case right?) ok this is getting really lame, i seriously keep to brush up my language and conversation.

Oh yeah the other thing is that, my language teacher keep emphasize on me that i shouldnt use ore. is that really that rude?
Yes, you really do address senior students as senpai.
And yes, you normally address someone you met for the first time, or someone you're not too familiar with yet, by their last name + san if they are older than you, or if they are female. However, in school, peers can just call each other by family names without suffix even when they are strangers, as long as they are the same grade. Do not address someone older or senior to you by just their name. Always put senpai or san after it.

Japan is, even in this modern day and age, very formal and mannerism towards elders/superiors are very much practiced and encouraged. It's nowhere near as "frank" as the way Americans treat strangers. There are exceptions and very frank people in Japan too, but they are not the norm or the standard. So be careful and play safe and be formal, rather than risking to be frowned upon.

Your overall speech does not need to be overly formal. But addressing of someone is diffrent story.
And lastly, "ore" is not rude to use if you're in school. Don't worry about it.
You only need to worry about that when you get to work in corporations, and it depends on your boss.
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Old 2007-10-20, 14:33   Link #295
Daughter!
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I have a few questions.

Do Japanese teenagers watch cartoons and shows from the US like we watch anime?

Is BSDM legal in Japan?
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Old 2007-10-20, 14:54   Link #296
WanderingKnight
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Quote:
Is BSDM legal in Japan?
According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
...In Japan, Germany, the Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries, consensual BDSM is legal.
Though that excerpt is indicated as "citation needed", so grab it with a pinch of salt.

That's curious, I never thought there could be reason enough to flag BSDM as illegal.
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Old 2007-11-06, 05:16   Link #297
Tri-ring
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Join Date: Oct 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pell14 View Post
well being too formal, this 慇懃無礼 term comes in right? (well i guess since im not excalty using keigo, this wouldnt be the case right?) ok this is getting really lame, i seriously keep to brush up my language and conversation.

Oh yeah the other thing is that, my language teacher keep emphasize on me that i shouldnt use ore. is that really that rude?
One clarification, "inginburei (慇懃無礼)" is a term used of not being overly formal but using formality in a sarcastic way.
In Japan as you might have learned there are three types of honorifics, Sonkeigo (尊敬語), Kenjougo (謙譲語) and Teineigo (丁寧語) they are used seperately in relative terms with whom you are addressing. So if you mistake the type of honorifics you maybe considered rude but these days even educated Japanese make mistakes with these sets so you don't have to be overly concerned.

Ore is a self proclaiming pronoun used usually by men. Girls with a tomboy attitude might use it in somecases but usually looked upon as a sign of immaturity.
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Old 2007-11-06, 17:55   Link #298
X10A_Freedom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pop-Punk Sucks View Post
I have a few questions.
Do Japanese teenagers watch cartoons and shows from the US like we watch anime?
Only kids I think. There's the disney/pixar films and back in my days (1990-1992), we had Looney and Tiny Toons dubbed into Japanese. Does Thomas the Tank Engine (UK) count? Watching "regular" anime beyond early teens is scorned upon.

Interestingly, manga is mainstream for most ages.
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Old 2007-11-06, 18:00   Link #299
Kang Seung Jae
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Join Date: Jul 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pop-Punk Sucks View Post
I have a few questions.

Do Japanese teenagers watch cartoons and shows from the US like we watch anime?

Is BSDM legal in Japan?
1. Cartoons: Rarely. Shows: Yeah, but not that popular, wolume-wise

2. Yes, it is.
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Old 2007-11-07, 02:36   Link #300
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Originally Posted by Kang Seung Jae View Post
Shows: Yeah, but not that popular, wolume-wise
Untrue.

American drama shows such as "24", "Full House", "Friends", "ER", etc, are insanely popular in Japan (dubbed in Japanese), and have high ratings.
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