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Old 2013-11-10, 11:15   Link #3261
SeijiSensei
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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The Olympics of the Future
Quote:
Self-driving cars are a given, auto enthusiasts say, perhaps reserved to whiz V.I.P.’s on designated lanes through the traffic-choked capital. To help hoi polloi navigate the city, buses powered by fuel cells will be commonplace, the futurists say. Older people in the graying country might wear robot suits to get around. Next-generation translation services, streamed through wearable technology, will help locals communicate with foreign guests. And perhaps there will be some climate engineering to ease the heat and wretched humidity of the Tokyo summer.

But there are also worries about the future. Tokyo, with 13 million people, is one of the world’s most disaster-prone cities — earthquakes, typhoons, tsunamis and storm surges. Experts worry about the effects shifting weather patterns will have on the Tokyo Bay section where many of its new Olympics venues will be built.
Images
Proposed Olympic Stadium
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I wonder if they will incorporate holographic projectors so that Hatsune Miku can appear on stage.
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Old 2013-11-10, 18:07   Link #3262
Fireminer
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Who know? Maybe we would have SAO next?
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Old 2013-11-10, 18:17   Link #3263
NoemiChan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeijiSensei View Post
The Olympics of the Future


Images
Proposed Olympic Stadium
Sorry; dynamic content not loaded. Reload?

I wonder if they will incorporate holographic projectors so that Hatsune Miku can appear on stage.
I had a vision that holographic idols will start their debut here..^^
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Old 2013-11-15, 22:21   Link #3264
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Japan's new rice policy threatens age-old farms
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Tokyo (Nov 15, Fri): The patchwork of tiny rice paddies that have decorated the terraced hillsides and alluvial plains of Japan for centuries is under threat as the government presses ageing farmers to consolidate holdings or switch crops.

The gentan system, which has paid landowners to reduce crops for more than four decades, should be dismantled by 2018, the agriculture ministry said in a proposal to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling party this month. The ministry also said it plans to create land banks in every prefecture to connect small holdings into larger tracts.

Subsidies for growers and import tariffs of 778 per cent sustain 1.2 million rice farms whose typical owner is a 70-year-old man living off pension payments, part-time work and sales of the grain, data from the Norinchukin Research Institute shows.

Mr Abe is weighing their votes, and the nation's cultural attachment to rice cultivation, against declining consumption and his push to expand free-trade agreements for manufacturers.

"Japan faces a turning point for agricultural policy and there is support for more aggressive and competitive farming," said Professor Tomoaki Iwai, who teaches politics at Nihon University in Tokyo. "Politicians see less merit in protecting agriculture in areas where the farming population is shrinking."

Can't go on
Mr Mitsuhiro Miyakoshi, the chief strategist for rice policy in Mr Abe's Liberal Democratic Party, said on Oct 30 that cutting payments under the gentan system would encourage inefficient, smaller-scale farms to shift to other crops or lease their land to bigger growers.

"Production is already in danger of extinction with the average age of Japanese rice farmers at 70," said Mr Miyakoshi. "We can't go on the way we have been."

Rice consumption in Japan peaked at 13.4 million tonnes in 1963 and then began falling as postwar economic expansion boosted incomes, allowing people to eat more meat, dairy products and other grains.

The government started the gentan system in 1970 to support prices by setting annual output targets that matched demand estimates. As people ate less rice, the targets shrank and the state paid subsidies to farmers who agreed to sow less grain.

Traditions at stake
Rice means more to the Japanese than just food. In effect, Mr Abe is also weighing tradition along with economics as he decides on policy changes for rice.

The emperor tends a small paddy on the grounds of the imperial palace, and blesses the nation's crop. Feudal lords used the staple to pay their samurai retainers. Families today drink sake and pound the grain into sticky rice cakes with wooden mallets when they gather to greet the New Year.

"Traditional farming has been the lifeblood of rural communities," said Mr Akio Shibata, the president of the Natural Resource Research Institute in Tokyo. "It's worrying that this form of agriculture, our rural landscape and age-old customs are under threat."

Mr Takaki Shigemoto, a commodity analyst at a Tokyo research company, said: "Abe has said he wants to protect Japan’s beautiful scenery and its rural communities with their rice paddies and orchards.

"[But] rice may disappear from the landscape after [his] reforms."

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Old 2013-11-16, 21:51   Link #3265
LeoXiao
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Round up the NEETs and stick them on the farms. It's the only way.
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Old 2013-11-16, 22:41   Link #3266
KiraYamatoFan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Round up the NEETs and stick them on the farms. It's the only way.
Agree with that. I always believe that NEETs should be rounded up together and moved on somewhere to make themselves useful to society even if that's on the farms. Same thing with convicts, whom I feel they never give enough return for what taxpayers pay for them.
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Old 2013-11-16, 23:32   Link #3267
AmeNoJaku
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Originally Posted by KiraYamatoFan View Post
Agree with that. I always believe that NEETs should be rounded up together and moved on somewhere to make themselves useful to society even if that's on the farms. Same thing with convicts, whom I feel they never give enough return for what taxpayers pay for them.
Fascism is getting popular everywhere I see
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Old 2013-11-16, 23:34   Link #3268
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Round up the NEETs and stick them on the farms. It's the only way.
Well we could oepn up more childcare centres and stick them in there to help boost birth rates.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
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Old 2013-11-17, 03:06   Link #3269
LeoXiao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmeNoJaku View Post
Fascism is getting popular everywhere I see
Well, I meant it kind of as a joke, but the loss of agricultural...culture is rather worrying. It's important for any society even today.
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Old 2013-11-17, 03:31   Link #3270
AmeNoJaku
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Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Well, I meant it kind of as a joke, but the loss of agricultural...culture is rather worrying. It's important for any society even today.
Sorry for being so blunt, but some things shouldn't be toyed with. Forcing any group of people into a way of life because it will benefit ours is a very dangerous thought process that has never resulted to the benefit of either. What you described has been exemplified by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and to a lesser extent by USA, USSR, PRC, Israel, and other countries after the abolition of slavery and never turned out well for any.
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Old 2013-11-17, 04:05   Link #3271
LeoXiao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmeNoJaku View Post
Sorry for being so blunt, but some things shouldn't be toyed with. Forcing any group of people into a way of life because it will benefit ours is a very dangerous thought process that has never resulted to the benefit of either. What you described has been exemplified by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and to a lesser extent by USA, USSR, PRC, Israel, and other countries after the abolition of slavery and never turned out well for any.
Let's not get ahead of ourselves. You'll note that I said "kind of a joke", which was immediately followed up by a statement explaining the "kind of" part. I should also mention that I'm prone to vehement denunciation of totalitarianism, particularly of the PRC since I know the most about it.

That being said, however, federal Germany up until 2011 had conscription. You could opt out and do civil service, but it was conscription nonetheless. There was and still is some criticism of it, but I don't think it was entirely negative, and certainly not "a very dangerous thought process". Even though it is no longer mandatory, the civil service institution and thus culture of social work still exists, which may well be a net positive for the country. This might possibly be implemented elsewhere.
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Old 2013-11-17, 04:09   Link #3272
NoemiChan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KiraYamatoFan View Post
Agree with that. I always believe that NEETs should be rounded up together and moved on somewhere to make themselves useful to society even if that's on the farms.
No. It's a bad idea. They'll just play Farmville instead.

Quote:
Same thing with convicts, whom I feel they never give enough return for what taxpayers pay for them.
I strongly support this. Hard labor with pay.^^
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Old 2013-11-17, 05:22   Link #3273
KiraYamatoFan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
That being said, however, federal Germany up until 2011 had conscription. You could opt out and do civil service, but it was conscription nonetheless. There was and still is some criticism of it, but I don't think it was entirely negative, and certainly not "a very dangerous thought process". Even though it is no longer mandatory, the civil service institution and thus culture of social work still exists, which may well be a net positive for the country. This might possibly be implemented elsewhere.
At the same time, such culture usually leads to opportunities for those who might not know yet what to do in life for a living or do not have work-related training at the time. The tone in my previous comment was somewhat harsh I'll concede, but the concept of working through mandatory public service, especially when you're a NEET, cannot do any wrong if this eventually leads a number of those people to be able in remaining in the labor force.

IMHO, it's better to have an impression of doing a low job, but still doing a job, than having no job at all. Speaking of the Japanese farming system, it would sure help a huge lot if some mandatory public service system is in place.
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Old 2013-11-17, 05:38   Link #3274
Dhomochevsky
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Having gone the civil path of conscription myself, I must tell you that your plans are overly optimistic.
The conscripted workforce was often reluctant to do any real work. And why shouldn't they?
There were a few who went about the task with dedication, often the same ones who would have volounteered to do charity work anyway. You know the mindset.
The rest of us were just a cheap labour force, being used for all kind of jobs that would have been payed much higher in a normal market situation, or that no one else would do by their own choice.

You need a special kind of character to work with this kind of people and guide them. You can not send them off to farms and expect farmers to get anything useful out of them.
That is a recipe for desaster.
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Old 2013-11-17, 08:59   Link #3275
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhomochevsky View Post
Having gone the civil path of conscription myself, I must tell you that your plans are overly optimistic.
The conscripted workforce was often reluctant to do any real work. And why shouldn't they?
There were a few who went about the task with dedication, often the same ones who would have volounteered to do charity work anyway. You know the mindset.
The rest of us were just a cheap labour force, being used for all kind of jobs that would have been payed much higher in a normal market situation, or that no one else would do by their own choice.

You need a special kind of character to work with this kind of people and guide them. You can not send them off to farms and expect farmers to get anything useful out of them.
That is a recipe for desaster.
Well we could try slave collars.

But I agree with you, there are always a larger bunch whom, knowing they have better opportunities outside, and are thus unwilling to do the draft. That being said, even those with dedication would be easily struck down as "spoiling the market" with the typical bullying and "forcible approaches".

Farming is bloody tough, even with machines. I wouldn't be surprised if any of those kids just suddenly ran away or killed themselves due to the immense level of stress.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-11-17, 10:45   Link #3276
AmeNoJaku
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Join Date: Apr 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhomochevsky View Post
Having gone the civil path of conscription myself, I must tell you that your plans are overly optimistic.
The conscripted workforce was often reluctant to do any real work. And why shouldn't they?
There were a few who went about the task with dedication, often the same ones who would have volounteered to do charity work anyway. You know the mindset.
The rest of us were just a cheap labour force, being used for all kind of jobs that would have been payed much higher in a normal market situation, or that no one else would do by their own choice.

You need a special kind of character to work with this kind of people and guide them. You can not send them off to farms and expect farmers to get anything useful out of them.
That is a recipe for desaster.
I agree.

Let me just add to the previous discussion, that conscription and public service (despite being hypocritical and repressive institution themselves), are not as bad as permanently forcing social and/or racial minorities to serfdom or slavery, as was suggested earlier.

But since we are way off topic here, I'd rather not carry on with this discussion, unless a proper thread is created.
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Old 2013-11-17, 15:46   Link #3277
LeoXiao
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Join Date: Mar 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhomochevsky View Post
Having gone the civil path of conscription myself, I must tell you that your plans are overly optimistic.
The conscripted workforce was often reluctant to do any real work. And why shouldn't they?
That may be so, but would it have been better for them to sit on their asses all day playing computer games and living off their parents? Sometimes, even if the direct effects of a policy are not ideal, the very atmosphere it creates can be a net positive. I hated being in school, but I don't doubt that school is necessary and that I did learn a lot from it despite being a poor student. Often something, anything, is better than nothing. As it regards Japan and their NEETs, that may well be the case.
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Old 2013-11-30, 21:26   Link #3278
AnimeFan188
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Join Date: Jan 2008
New enmity between Japan and Korea plays out in Tokyo’s Koreatown:

"The main streets of Shin-Okubo — Tokyo’s Koreatown — are lined with smoky
barbecue restaurants and overlit cosmetics emporiums. Staircases lead down to
basement music venues and up to hidden drinking holes.

Japanese once thronged the neighborhood, which is home to many ethnic Koreans
and known for its fiery food and late nights. But in recent months, the crowds have
thinned, replaced by anti-Korean protesters who have turned Shin-Okubo into a
rough barometer of deteriorating Japan-Korea relations."

See:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/...254_story.html
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Old 2013-12-01, 05:00   Link #3279
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnimeFan188 View Post
New enmity between Japan and Korea plays out in Tokyo’s Koreatown:

"The main streets of Shin-Okubo — Tokyo’s Koreatown — are lined with smoky
barbecue restaurants and overlit cosmetics emporiums. Staircases lead down to
basement music venues and up to hidden drinking holes.

Japanese once thronged the neighborhood, which is home to many ethnic Koreans
and known for its fiery food and late nights. But in recent months, the crowds have
thinned, replaced by anti-Korean protesters who have turned Shin-Okubo into a
rough barometer of deteriorating Japan-Korea relations."

See:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/...254_story.html
These people should be rounded up and flogged in public. They are hurting the production of Japanese-Korean lolis.
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When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2013-12-01, 06:39   Link #3280
Terrestrial Dream
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Quote:
The Japanese government’s hope, Yamada said, is to reduce hate speech with education and enlightenment, not with new laws.
Ideally yes, but the situation haven't changed, every year it is the same thing.
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