AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2014-01-28, 01:45   Link #3341
Nerroth
Alea iacta est.
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 33
I was looking at some info online about Hokkaido, and saw that the prefectural government has its own YouTube channel, with a playlist of English-language videos.

But what I found really interesting is that one of these English videos looks at the Ainu:



There are other videos about the Ainu on the channel, such as this one narrated in Japanese:

__________________
Nerroth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-02-20, 10:18   Link #3342
MrTerrorist
Takao Tsundere Cruiser
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Classified
Japan's "Naked Festival" Is a Sea of Man Butt

So much steam coming out from the Sea of Men.
__________________
MrTerrorist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-06, 09:53   Link #3343
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
Tsukiji Market to get new waterfront site
Quote:
Tokyo (March 2, Sun): A popular wholesale market described as "old and dirty" by a former Tokyo governor is about to get a new lease of life as a waterfront attraction expected to cost more than 500 billion yen (US$4.9 billion).

Two years from now, fans of the Tsukiji Market will find it in a new spot overlooking Tokyo Bay.

It will have a food court featuring award-winning street food from around Japan, restaurants, hot-spring baths and even a hotel.

The new facility, expected to attract some 4.2 million people a year, will fill some 40ha (100 acres) of reclaimed land in Toyosu.

That is twice the size of the present Tsukiji Market — which is the size of 43 football fields with no comparable tourist facilities — and about 2km (1.25 miles) from the spot where it has stood since 1935.

That will put it close to the athletes' village that will be built to house competitors in the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

At a ground-breaking ceremony at Toyosu on Friday (Feb 28), Mr Hiroyasu Ito, representing the wholesalers and other businesses now operating at Tsukiji, said: "We hope to make the new market one of the best in the world."

Restricted paths for visitors

One of the market's main attractions are the early-morning auctions, especially of tuna.

But visitors have often been reproached for getting in the way of Tsukiji's professional buyers and causing hygiene problems by touching fish with their bare hands.

At the new market, sightseers will be restricted to designated pathways to keep them separated from people working there and out of the way of forklifts.

Visitors can also check into a hotel and soak in hot-spring baths, while taking in the views of Tokyo Bay at night. The hot-spring bath complex is expected to be the largest in the city.

New site was polluted

The relocation of Tsukiji Market was made necessary because it had become, in the words of the outspoken former Tokyo governor Shintaro Ishihara, "old and dirty".

The city owed it to consumers to move the market to a new place, he said. At first, there was resistance to the move to Toyosu, which was previously occupied by the Tokyo Gas utility company, where traces of pollutants such as benzene, cyanide and arsenic had been found.

The authorities were forced to conduct expensive cleaning operations, essentially replacing 2m (2 yards) of polluted top soil with clean soil and cleaning up the underground water.

The cost of that exercise as well as the increase in the cost of construction is expected to bring the government's total bill for the new facility to well over 500 billion yen.

The present Tsukiji market is the largest of 11 wholesale markets in Japan and is capable of handling 490,000 tonnes of marine products alone in a year.

This far exceeds the 130,000 tonnes handled by the Nagoya wholesale market, the second largest in the country.

Officials hope the new market at Toyosu will handle 10 per cent to 20 per cent more marine products. But the target may prove difficult to attain as the Japanese are eating less fish these days.

THE STRAITS TIMES
TinyRedLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-06, 09:58   Link #3344
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
I visited that place with Joker last December and it is just like your typical fish market, but more awesome and larger. I admit that the place is pretty run down and old though.

It would be interesting to see how the much older residents take this.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-07, 03:03   Link #3345
AmeNoJaku
dead-pan
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Work in Europe... imminent :(
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
I visited that place with Joker last December and it is just like your typical fish market, but more awesome and larger. I admit that the place is pretty run down and old though.

It would be interesting to see how the much older residents take this.
Well, at least the Inari shrine next to it will stop sticking of raw fish now
__________________
AmeNoJaku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-12, 22:33   Link #3346
Fireminer
Lumine Passio
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hanoi, Vietnam
Age: 8
Anyone here know a festival that is celebrated by both Japanese and Chinese in October? The better if it connects to the sea.

(On a side not, how long would it take a submarine with the constant speed of 50 knots to travel from Tokyo Port to Sekaku islands?)
Fireminer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-12, 23:00   Link #3347
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
First of all, Chinese festivals correspond to dates on the Chinese lunar calendar. As a result, the festivals don't always fall on the same date on the Western Gregorian calendar. The Chinese New Year, for example, started on Jan 31 this year and on Feb 10 the year before.

The only major Chinese festival to fall on September or October is the Mid-Autumn Festival. The Japanese equivalent is Tsukimi. Neither festival has anything to do with the sea. Both, on the other hand, originated from autumn harvest festivals.

Fifty knots roughly equals 93kmh. The Senkaku Islands are about 1,885km away from Tokyo. You can do the maths from there.
TinyRedLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-14, 20:21   Link #3348
Nerroth
Alea iacta est.
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 33
I'm currently watching Earth From Space on National Geographic, and part of the live feed from the International Space Station features Wakata Koichi, the current ISS commander.

Here in Canada, Chris Hadfield earned a bit of a name for himself during (and after) his recent stint on the station. So I was wondering: how much (if any) interest is there in Japan for Wakata-san's mission in space?
__________________
Nerroth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-16, 19:20   Link #3349
AnimeFan188
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
This Japanese Manga Doesn’t Mince Words About War Crimes:

"Shigeru Mizuki is one of Japan’s oldest and most famous working manga artists.
He’s best known for drawing yokai—basically, Japanese ghosts and monsters.

But in recent years, the 92-year-old cartoonist has turned to Japan’s militaristic
Showa era. The result is a stunning series of graphic novels based on historical
research and Mizuki’s own experiences growing up and fighting in Tokyo’s imperial
wars.

His latest work, Showa: A History of Japan, is an unblinking recollection of one of the
20th century’s darkest periods."

See:

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/acb87aa68a3e
AnimeFan188 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-16, 23:12   Link #3350
LeoXiao
提倡自我工業化
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vereinigte Staaten
Age: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnimeFan188 View Post
But in recent years, the 92-year-old cartoonist has turned to Japan’s militaristic
Showa era. The result is a stunning series of graphic novels based on historical
research and Mizuki’s own experiences growing up and fighting in Tokyo’s imperial
wars.

His latest work, Showa: A History of Japan, is an unblinking recollection of one of the
20th century’s darkest periods."
I may very well get this.

EDIT: I now have some serious respect for this old man.

Last edited by LeoXiao; 2014-03-16 at 23:36.
LeoXiao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-17, 00:53   Link #3351
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Having grandparents who lived through Syonan on both sides, sometimes it can be heartened to know that not all soldiers are assholes. Even the MPAJA elements have their own motives in fighting the Japanese.

It is a pity some just have that eternal grudge they want to pass onto their next generation. Glad this old man chose not to so as to put matters to the rest. Then their descendants can move on.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-17, 02:31   Link #3352
Terrestrial Dream
勇者
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Tesla Leicht Institute
Age: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnimeFan188 View Post
This Japanese Manga Doesn’t Mince Words About War Crimes:

"Shigeru Mizuki is one of Japan’s oldest and most famous working manga artists.
He’s best known for drawing yokai—basically, Japanese ghosts and monsters.

But in recent years, the 92-year-old cartoonist has turned to Japan’s militaristic
Showa era. The result is a stunning series of graphic novels based on historical
research and Mizuki’s own experiences growing up and fighting in Tokyo’s imperial
wars.

His latest work, Showa: A History of Japan, is an unblinking recollection of one of the
20th century’s darkest periods."

See:

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/acb87aa68a3e
Can't help but respect man like this. Koreans these day see and hear too many negative stories about Japan, we need more man like him.
__________________
Terrestrial Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-17, 07:53   Link #3353
sa547
Senior Member
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Philippines
Age: 37
I read about the manga some time ago, and I was impressed that he's (and also perhaps Koshun Takami, who wrote in Battle Royale of a post-war dictatorial empire surrounding the game of death, and the horrors of fascism) unlike those apologists who endorse school book history revisions and extremists who mistakenly think that a return to militarism is also a return to past glory.
__________________
sa547 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-23, 09:06   Link #3354
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
AKB48 Producer Akimoto to Produce 2020 Tokyo Olympics Opening Ceremony

Unsurprisingly not everyone in Japan is thrilled with this news.

Quote:
The news was largely greeted with delight by the Japanese public, especially the younger demographic. Yet even before Akimoto was formally appointed, an Internet backlash made itself heard. A petition on the site Change.org started by Gee Kawai called for the committee to reconsider its decision. Kawai claims that there is a "silent majority of Japanese who are apprehensive of a future entertainment industry that emphasizes artists without talent who only push marketing and personal branding and set up special interests and exclusive economic zones."
__________________
SeijiSensei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-03-23, 11:35   Link #3355
ChainLegacy
廉頗
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Massachusetts, US
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nerroth View Post
I was looking at some info online about Hokkaido, and saw that the prefectural government has its own YouTube channel, with a playlist of English-language videos.

But what I found really interesting is that one of these English videos looks at the Ainu:
Late reply, but thanks for posting this -it's a good watch. I find the Ainu culture just as fascinating as the Japanese, though of course there is much less information about them.
ChainLegacy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-04-14, 22:31   Link #3356
AnimeFan188
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Through Japanese Eyes: World War II in Japanese Cinema:

"A film about kamikaze pilots has been playing to packed theaters from Hokkaido to
Kyushu since its release in December of 2013, becoming one of the top-grossing
Japanese productions of all time. In addition to attracting the admiration of Prime
Minster Shinzo Abe, “The Eternal Zero” has drawn a fair amount of criticism for being
the latest in a string of recent films that mythologize the Japanese role in World War
II."

See:

http://news.usni.org/2014/04/14/japa...apanese-cinema
AnimeFan188 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-05-03, 21:44   Link #3357
Nerroth
Alea iacta est.
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 33
I'm currently working my way through a new book (printed in 2014) called Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics, written by Dr. Mark K. Watson (currently of Concordia University in Montréal), which I loaned out from the local Japan Foundation library.

Quote:
This book is about the Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan, living in and around Tokyo; it is, therefore, about what has been pushed to the margins of history. Customarily, anthropologists and public officials have represented Ainu issues and political affairs as limited to rural pockets of Hokkaido. Today, however, a significant proportion of the Ainu people live in and around major cities on the main island of Honshu, particularly Tokyo. Based on extensive original ethnographic research, this book explores this largely unknown diasporic aspect of Ainu life and society. Drawing from debates on place-based rights and urban indigeneity in the twenty-first century, the book engages with the experiences and collective struggles of Tokyo Ainu in seeking to promote a better understanding of their cultural and political identity and sense of community in the city. Looking in-depth for the first time at the urban context of ritual performance, cultural transmission and the construction of places or ‘hubs’ of Ainu social activity, this book argues that recent government initiatives aimed at fostering a national Ainu policy will ultimately founder unless its architects are able to fully recognize the historical and social complexities of the urban Ainu experience.
One thing that is interesting about the book is how it often sets the situation of the Ainu diaspora in Tokyo in the framework of other indigenous peoples moving from their "traditional" lands (or at least those which may be formally designated as such by their respective governments) to live and work in larger cities - such as those from the various First Nations of Canada who live in places like Montréal, Toronto, or Vancouver.

It also mentions the role that the now-defunct Rera Cise restaurant played in helping to shape part of the Tokyo Ainu community - and notes that, despite its closure, its legacy lives on through a new restaurant, Harukor.

And, indeed, it notes that there is more than one group which holds claim to Ainu identity in the area. Just as the various First Nations peoples in a place like Toronto may come from a range of diverse groups across Canada, those who self-identify as Ainu in Tokyo are not necessarily descended from a common corner of Hokkaido (or Sakhalin, or elsewhere).

With the difficulties in trying to revitalize the Ainu presence in Hokkaido itself, the issue of what, if anything, to treat the Ainu presence in Tokyo and eslewhere has been controversial. But the volume makes a compelling case that, wherevet the ongoing process of re-defining the status and meaning of the word "Ainu" in Japan may go, it may well find itself being increasingly shaped by the role played by a broader Ainu diaspora.
__________________
Nerroth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-05-05, 19:47   Link #3358
Hazou
Immortal Flames
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Can I ask a stupid question

Are there grocery stores? Where do they majorily buy their meat and veg?
__________________

Burn strongly and freely, my immortal flames.
Hazou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-05-05, 21:27   Link #3359
Fireminer
Lumine Passio
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hanoi, Vietnam
Age: 8
@Hazou: Please read from this: http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2073.html
Fireminer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2014-05-05, 22:01   Link #3360
Hazou
Immortal Flames
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fireminer View Post
@Hazou: Please read from this: http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2073.html
Oh sweet. Boom I won the argument with my brother.
__________________

Burn strongly and freely, my immortal flames.
Hazou is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
culture, discussion, japan, japanese culture

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 16:36.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.