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Old 2008-08-05, 22:37   Link #741
yukkuri
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I am Japanese.  Are there any questions?

I live in Japan by the Japanese.
This forum was known and registered.
I like animated cartoon, cartoon, and game.
I think that it can happily become Mr. all.
And, I want to become it so, too.

By the way, does not you doubt the animated cartoon of Japan, and is there a thing that doesn't understand about an actual animated cartoon and Japan?
I want to answer within the range answered me if there are such a doubt and a question.

Neither it nor I are good at English.
The translation page is used.
Please pardon it though it is thought that it becomes English not
read easily.
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Old 2008-08-05, 23:06   Link #742
LiberLibri
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Please watch such threads as Japanese Culture, Learning Japanese, School in Japan, or Japanese Food. Some people write questions concerning Japan on the Silly Question thread.

And be aware that you are not a great Japanologist just because you were born there. Not a few foreign anime fans have deeper insight into Japanese culture and society than a normal Japanese (including I) does.
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Old 2008-08-05, 23:12   Link #743
Vexx
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You posted a very entertaining thread opener, yukkuri

As LiberLibri posts, your input would be interesting in the cultural and "life in Japan" types of threads.

Do you live in Tokyo? Or perhaps Nara? Sapporo? Many people would be interested in how your daily life goes. Also, some of us may like trying out our Japanese on you

じゃまた。
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Old 2008-08-05, 23:29   Link #744
Shii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukkuri View Post
I am Japanese.  Are there any questions?
What is the best maid cafe in Akihabara?
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Shii (formerly known as ashibaka)
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Old 2008-08-06, 00:28   Link #745
yukkuri
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The usage of this forum is not understood still well and pardon it, please it
is writing the Japanese style.

>>Zoned87
Thank you for the contribution in Japanese.
There is certainly a thing that attainments to the work are also the
deep end and are surprised more than the Japanese while the American
seems to have the knowledge of a lot of Japan and is sulky.

This time, please let me explain why I set up this thread.
Please feel free to hear though it is because it was seen to discuss it of it think that it knows the thing of a lot of Japan perhaps ..having.. more than I think when there is a thing however that doesn't understand though the content that translated the communication in the animated cartoon forum in the foreign country on a certain site the other day was seen that there seems to be a thing that doesn't understand if it is not still Japanese.


>>LiberLibri
Thank you for introducing sleep to have ..it is.. such a thread.
I want to write it when there is a question answered me.

It is so.
Certainly, I am not a scholar in Japan.
Therefore, the hard question might not be deeply answered.
However, I think that there is an answered thing if it is a general question
not learnt in study, too.

I think that there only haves to be a thing that we some can help.


>>Vexx
Hello.

I think that it becomes a profitable thread for you.
I want to answer if there is something answered in a little doubt.

I live in the place of Gunma Prefecture in Japan.
The place that is the stage of the animated cartoon of initial D.
It lived in Tokyo on business for three years.
Please question on not only the animated cartoon but also usual
Japanese life and the custom, etc.

It is very welcomed to talk to in Japanese.
At that time, should I answer in Japanese?
Please try by all means.
じゃまた!

>>yumenonaka
日本の方かな?
確かに自動翻訳だけだと大変ですね。
ですが英語の勉強(といっても読む部分だけですが)にもなるかなと思ったので、やれるだけやっ てみます。
心配してくれてありがとうございます。

>>shii
It examined it because it had not been to the housemaid cafe.

This shop seems to be the most popular.

「@ほぉ~むCafe」

Even if the address on the homepage is put, is this forum safe?
URL is put if there is no problem.
Please go by all means when you come to Japan.


Writing has fairly become long.
When still becoming long, should I contribute dividing into several-
time?

Moreover, there might be a part not read easily because it is an automatic
translation and a part felt unpleasant.
Please pardon it.
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Old 2008-08-06, 03:44   Link #746
Mystique
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Quote:
>>yumenonaka
日本の方かな?
確かに自動翻訳だけだと大変ですね。
ですが英語の勉強(といっても読む部分だけですが)にもなるかなと思ったので、やれるだけやっ てみます。
心配してくれてありがとうございます。
I can only make a guess from that reply what yumenonaka said before their question got deleted is the same thing i was thinking (and i agree with yumenonka in that case)
The use of the auto translation (like google translation) makes the english even more awkward than perhaps your personal attempts and that you should try to practice. I'm trying to understand your replies, even more so with deleted posts, but it's really difficult

Since the admin is deleting all japanese posts to you, if you want to converse in japanese and practice your english you can do so on your profile message board here:
http://forums.animesuki.com/member.php?u=83261

Quick question to xris though, for future reference for the rest of us:
If translation in english is provided in a post along with the japanese, is that allowed or is that still an auto delete from you?

I understand it being an english forum, but in the case where someone's english becomes really awkward (in this case with use of an auto translation program) and communication kinda breaks down, aren't there exceptions or middle ground to assist both native speakers and non native speakers to participate on Animesuki?
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Last edited by Mystique; 2008-08-06 at 04:10.
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Old 2008-08-06, 04:05   Link #747
Vexx
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The specific thread for "learning japanese" seems to be exempt from this restriction (which is a forum rule after all) ... but I would think that providing english and japanese versions should be okay when trying to make things clear ... but that would just be my recommendation.

@Yukkari: aye, I'd drop the auto-translator usage. Its amusing but I don't think it is really helping you much

Just try personally writing in English and then provide the Japanese as a note if you aren't sure about the translation.
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Old 2008-08-06, 14:37   Link #748
Autumn Demon
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Is there some tradition where girls cut their hair short when they're dumped? What is the purpose of doing so?
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Old 2008-08-06, 16:02   Link #749
Vexx
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It isn't a "tradition" so much as a tactic that girls will often change their appearance with a new hairstyle if they're 'on the radar' again.
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Old 2008-08-07, 03:02   Link #750
LiberLibri
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The principal "purpose" of the behaviour is to refresh herself and change the mood.

From the viewpoint of tradition, yes, Japanese women have cut their hair when something sad occur to them. Originally it was a Buddhism ritual; women suffering from a deadly mental pain often wished to abandon their secular lives and become priestesses in order to achieve a calm understanding of the world. Buddhism tells how to suppress your desire and love. They were required to cut the hair as a proof of their determination. As time passed, the ritual has lost the serious meaning and became a light, popular custom.

But nobody today cares such a background of course. Rather, they cut hair to kill old self and obtain a new self.
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Old 2008-08-07, 05:54   Link #751
Mystique
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Libri and vexx, this is for you.
news article: learn to be nice to your wife, or pay the price

Well Libri I can say that cause he’s a Japanese male (albeit, living in Europe and a younger, more enlightened generation, lol)
Vexx I know you’re married; dunno if you’ve lived in Japan for many many years (or are Japanese - and no it's not a jibe at you for learning to be nice to your wife, lol) rather I know you have a lot of knowledge on the culture so since it’s an interesting topic, thought to post/discuss in here. ^^

I figured to place it in the Japanese culture thread, simply cause it is something I’ve discussed/studied in Japanese anthropology classes at uni (as well as seeing it at my host family’s home, though my host dad is young and a lot more carefree so he was definitely more attentive to me and my host brother too) And sure enough, it’s as aspect of Japanese life that isn’t focused on much by foreigners outside of Japan, so it’s something to learn

But I remember the BBC doing a report about middle aged wives and mothers, whose kids have grown to their 20’s left their homes and the mother suddenly has no life and zero relationship with her husband, she has looked after him, family and home for 25 odd years without demanding anything so suddenly when responsibility has been lifted, many actually wanna divorce and pursue their own lives, whether it be to work, or travel.

I’m not sure how I feel on the news story; I can’t see the Japanese women as money grabbing vindictive gold-diggers.
Scorned, yes, but not vindictive per se; to be honest, there isn’t much help from society or the government for full time mothers, no childcare options or financial support like many western countries offer, so it can feel like a trap (probably why so many are opting to marry in their late 20’s now) – at least from the attitudes of salarymen and stories I’ve heard while living there, to me it feels like a trap, lol.
I remember studying about women in the workplace over the last 30 years and still many companies will not allow a woman to pursue a career or even climb up the ladder post pregnancy, at best she can get a part time position but it’s nothing stable, so for most part she can only stay at home to look after the kids.

Perhaps the salarymen are suffering at the unjust work system of after work drinks and socialising (uuugh, I forgot the official term there, help!)
Add on top of that, that women all over the world want to be appreciated and loved, Japan is a culture where affection isn’t openly displayed or expressed, it’s kinda a tricky situation on both sides of the marriage.

Anyways, thoughts, questions, opinions here on the new law that’s gone into place, feel free to ask or express. ^^
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Old 2008-08-07, 13:50   Link #752
Vexx
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My first thought was wow, the Washington Post is really behind the curve on this topic.

Then I noticed the article date: November 2007.

I've been following Japan's social culture since the 1980s and its been my observation that Japan follows American social trends minus about 20 years. Just to be annoyingly superficial.... at the moment Japanese women seem to be hitting that 1970s stride of being their own person... while the men are stubbornly entrenched in the 1950s "Ward and June Cleaver" mindset. With the pension act - the women don't have to put up with it anymore.

Those men catching the drift that social reality is changing will do okay (like the guy in the article taking pains to learn who his wife is and how to do things with her) -- there are whole schools that have sprung up to teach men how not to be jerks in Japan.

These middle-agers and older are one issue. My concern is that many of them run companies that still are so "family unfriendly" that the younger child-bearing set are simply not getting married or having kids - leading to the declining population problem. THAT's where attitudes simply have to change if Japan, Inc. wants to stay relevant in the world. The companies are resisting these needed changes at the expense of their country.

There's a recent Wide Angle presentation of documentary called [Senkyo] Campaign (by Kazuhiro Soda). It presents outstanding insight into present day Japan as it follows a first time politician and his career wife through an LDP campaign for a city council position. I highly recommend it.
http://www.filmbaby.com/films/2177
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Old 2008-08-07, 13:54   Link #753
Zoned87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
I can only make a guess from that reply what yumenonaka said before their question got deleted is the same thing i was thinking (and i agree with yumenonka in that case)
The use of the auto translation (like google translation) makes the english even more awkward than perhaps your personal attempts and that you should try to practice. I'm trying to understand your replies, even more so with deleted posts, but it's really difficult

Since the admin is deleting all japanese posts to you, if you want to converse in japanese and practice your english you can do so on your profile message board here:
http://forums.animesuki.com/member.php?u=83261

Quick question to xris though, for future reference for the rest of us:
If translation in english is provided in a post along with the japanese, is that allowed or is that still an auto delete from you?

I understand it being an english forum, but in the case where someone's english becomes really awkward (in this case with use of an auto translation program) and communication kinda breaks down, aren't there exceptions or middle ground to assist both native speakers and non native speakers to participate on Animesuki?
I think she said:

Japanese kana?
When using an automatic translations, be clear or the results can be weak.
It is because you thought Kana would convert to sturdy English (saying that is what you read) you can do it, just try doing it.
Thank you for worrying


I might be wrong though, im still an amateur as a translator.
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Old 2008-08-08, 02:21   Link #754
LiberLibri
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I should find a woman to marry before I worry about the divorce crisis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
L
Perhaps the salarymen are suffering at the unjust work system of after work drinks and socialising (uuugh, I forgot the official term there, help!)
Add on top of that, that women all over the world want to be appreciated and loved, Japan is a culture where affection isn’t openly displayed or expressed, it’s kinda a tricky situation on both sides of the marriage.
Do you mean nominucation (nomu [drink] + communication)?

I worked at a Japanese company for two and half years. I had terribly bad luck; the company had just made a contract with Japan Post to build a new complicated computer system required for the privatisation (2007). The schedule, drafted by politicians taking nothing technical into consideration, was incredibly tight. We had to work harder and harder till midnight, and have nominucation to soothe the irritated clients by making them feel sympathy for our suffering. There remained something good in Pandora's box; I was economically rewarded so much. But I did not know when to use the money. If I had gotten married, I might have had serious family discord.

It is not often for salarymen in the 21C to have such a situation, but it is not extinguished yet. Japanese prosperity after WW2 has depended, at least partly, upon their sacrifice. And, to make the situation worse, salarymen have been motivated with the missionary consciousness. They think they could, or should, throw away everything "private", including wives, children, parents or friends, in order to contribute to the company and the society. As time passed, companies have changed their nature from intimate Gemeinschäfte into business-like Gesellschäfte, the ex-warriors are now deserted by both the organisations and spouses.

The labour conditions for women have been improved, though slowly. The Labourer's Welfare Act of 1992 obliged employers to offer days off to fathers or mothers until the children reach one and half y.o. The government compensate 60% of their wage during the period. There are several kinds of financial supports provided by the central or local governments, such as maternity allowance (JPY 300,000 for each baby). More and more women obtain the seats of executives in large companies and public offices these days. Yet the achievements are still far low compared to some advanced societies. Unless the progression is speeded up, the aging society will experience serious stall and crash.
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Old 2008-08-08, 13:17   Link #755
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manga character sets example for Japanese businesses.
http://www.economist.com/opinion/dis...ry_id=11885715
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Old 2008-08-08, 17:24   Link #756
Zoned87
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Many Japanese work to hard at their jobs. No one has that level of work ethic in the United States, a job is just a job... you do what is required of you to get paid.

Wasting your life for a company is pointless
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Old 2008-08-08, 18:28   Link #757
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoned87 View Post
... No one has that level of work ethic in the United States, a job is just a job... you do what is required of you to get paid.

Wasting your life for a company is pointless
Um... most definitely untrue. I and many people I know have been on deathmarch projects that involved 60-90 hours per week for months at a time for defense contracts, space exploration contracts --- projects where people could die if you screwed up or might die if you didn't deliver 100% right and on schedule. I have medical friends who sometimes work 48 hours straight in emergency room shifts, surgeons who routinely work 60-80hrs per week. I watch electrical linemen and firefighters who are all about doing it *right* whatever it takes.

There are many professions in the US where "that level of work ethic" is mandatory because they are *mission critical*. Look that phrase up.

Now... that last line is certainly true for some jobs especially when some companies are run by dimwits that don't grasp who their critical assets are. One reason many American corporations are in so much trouble and rolling on pure inertia is that they destroyed the employee-employer connection in the 1980s in a quest for short-term profits instead of long term stable and reliable profits. This in turn is creating an employee demographic who does not give a crap about their work -- but it isn't *everyone*.

There are certainly many sorts of jobs and companies where that level of dedication is absurd, however, many americans could take a clue from the japanese and many japanese could take a clue from the americans. As is typically human --- each group seems to pick up the worst habits of the other.....

Last edited by Vexx; 2008-08-08 at 18:43.
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Old 2008-08-09, 01:45   Link #758
LiberLibri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoned87 View Post
Many Japanese work to hard at their jobs. No one has that level of work ethic in the United States, a job is just a job... you do what is required of you to get paid.

Wasting your life for a company is pointless
As Weber pointed, the missionary-like labour ethics based on Protestantism has enabled the accumulation of capitals and industries, and formed Capitalism in the north-Atlantic regions, hasn't it? It is ironical that the daughters and sons of the Mayflower finally come to the mind "a job is just a job".

On the contrary, it is also curious that the working style of "diligent" Japanese was established after the 19C. Statistics shows that not less than one fourth of those in working age in urban areas were in part-time jobs; so-called "Freeters" today. They had little loyalty nor professionalism in labour. The Meiji government tried hard to transplant the ethics of Puritans without the Christian teaching. Yes, traditional dogmas of, for example, Samurai, played certain role to forge a loyal nation, but they had had nothing with the vast majority of people until the project.
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Old 2008-08-09, 02:07   Link #759
Zoned87
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I would work hard if it was for myself, but not to benefit others... especially rich corporate hogs.
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Old 2008-08-09, 23:59   Link #760
waterchan
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Ki (or Chi)

In the West, there is an increasing interest in ki (or chi in Chinese-related arts). During the martial arts boom in the West, it was usually regarded as an abstract form of projecting energy into martial arts techniques. These days, some people even seem to think it as a supernatural phenomenon that can be projected through thin air to affect other objects. Look at this video, for example. Some of us actually think that such demonstrations of chi are real.

I'd like to hear thoughts on this from people who have resided or are residing in Japan (or China). I know that ki is a part of daily language, such as when saying お元気ですか,  やる気ない、 気をつけて、 人気、 気がする and so on. But the notion often extend into the supernatural? Or do they simply regard it as an abstract notion of mood or feeling?

Those who have practiced Eastern martial arts probably have a better sense of ki; hopefully not too many people take it to this level, though.
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