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Old 2010-11-21, 12:48   Link #1541
dangodaikazoku
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Join Date: Mar 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Hm, I always thought "lamian" and "ramen" were the same thing?
Of course we use "lamian" in Chinese to refer to both Chinese lamian and Japanese ramen (and Japanese do the same with "ramen"), but surely you've got to agree that the Chinese and Japanese versions are rather different things??

蘭州拉麵 Lanzhou lamian (Chinese): http://www.bbker.com/img/F297680840.jpg
九州ラーメン Kyushu ramen (Japanese): http://cache.walkerplus.com/16018404...HCBP001_01.jpg

The soup base plus the texture, taste and colour of the noodles are completely different. While "ramen" might be a loanword from Chinese, Japanese ramen appears to me a completely Japanese invention.

Also, when we say "lamian" in Chinese, we certainly wouldn't be referring to instant noodles... which seems to be the tendency with "ramen" in America and perhaps Japan too.
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Old 2010-11-21, 12:53   Link #1542
LeoXiao
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Well I guess that makes sense. Hm....tasty...
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Old 2010-11-21, 23:42   Link #1543
risingstar3110
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OK, this question should be more about culture than actual "learning Japanese thread..."

In anime with real ancient characters Horo (in Spice& Wolf) or Gekka (Kyouran Kazoku Nikki), the character often end their sentence with "ja" or "ya".. which is different with most of the Japanese structure end that i know of

Is that a really formal/royal way to speak or something?
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Old 2010-11-23, 22:59   Link #1544
mindovermatter
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What's the Japanese take on what we Americans call "the fifth amendment?"

a huge part of the American justice system is the defendants right to remain silent, but I came across this scene from an anime (thumb nail below) where the family is sitting around eating, and the radio in the background is talking about how a criminal is obstructing justice by not talking, and it got me curious about how this works in Japan


kind of on the same subject, what's the deal with the Yakuza and the police?
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Old 2010-11-24, 03:06   Link #1545
Samari
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How sex-oriented is Japan? Is their birthrate really negative? With all of the horny game shows, JAV stars, panty vending machines, etc., how in the world does Japan have a negative birthrate? This is kind of a serious question, but also funny at the same time. I'm guessing everyone is too busy with work and other responsibilities? Please excuse my ignorance if it's quite apparent on this issue.
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Old 2010-11-24, 03:15   Link #1546
0utf0xZer0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samari View Post
How sex-oriented is Japan? Is their birthrate really negative? With all of the horny game shows, JAV stars, panty vending machines, etc., how in the world does Japan have a negative birthrate? This is kind of a serious question, but also funny at the same time. I'm guessing everyone is too busy with work and other responsibilities? Please excuse my ignorance if it's quite apparent on this issue.
Too busy with work seems to be a commonly cited reason, but I wouldn't be surprised if the fact that a lot of young people have trouble making a decent living due to long standing economic issues is a major factor as well. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if you see this start to crop up in the west as well at the rate we're going.
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Old 2010-11-24, 03:40   Link #1547
Seitsuki
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I do believe the problem *started* in the "West". The greatest factor was economic liberation and gender equality- once women had the motivation to aspire beyond being a housewife and the means to do so most did. The younger generations are also as 0utf0x mentioned finding it harder to obtain work- the proportion of salarymen is dropping and freeters (those who work casually) as well as unemployed are on the rise. This shrinking wealth as well as the younger generation's desire to live for themselves more than their country (a sentiment which has been steadily growing) has resulted in an aversion to having children, both as a social and economic burden.

Not to mention despite all those H-esque things you've mentioned, Japanese society as a whole is still very conservative. Sure attitudes are changing, as do all things, but things such as one night stands/casual dating and sex are still rather frowned upon as immoral and discouraged in lieu of building a proper family.
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Old 2010-11-24, 08:19   Link #1548
TinyRedLeaf
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I have to admit this: For the past two years, I've been an avid fan of the immensely addictive Sasuke TV competition series, better known internationally as Ninja Warrior.







It's got everything you'd ask of gladiatorial sport: Hugely entertaining competitors, highy enthusiastic supporters and comically over-the-top commentators (in the Japanese-language versions, at least). There is even a kunoichi version (allowing us guys to perv in office, joked one of my female colleagues):



Alas, because of work, I've managed only to catch a few episodes every now and then. Just wondering if there are more fans of this show in this forum?
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Old 2010-11-24, 18:30   Link #1549
MakubeX2
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I suppose this falls under here as well :-

Dairy Of A Bride from China

Blog owner was a single Japanese otaku in his 40's working as an illustrator for a game company when by fate, he met and married a girl from mainland China in her 20's.

The above blog is a humourous partilly fictional attempt from him poking at her as she adjust to life in Japan when cultural clash is inevitable in short 4 komas.

Here's one of the first koma with my translation :-



Translation :-

The first thing that surprise Yue when she came to Japan was :-
"There's Paper in the toilet !"

She was left in surprise by this simple fact.
"Wow"
She did inspect each and every cubinet.

"Why don't the Japanese just take them ?"
And just why are you asking me......

She was left in awe for a while there.
And paper here as well.
"Truly this is Japan"
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Old 2010-11-24, 20:58   Link #1550
risingstar3110
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I am not that surprised, but i didn't expect the toilet paper in Japan (if it's really true) are simply left like that... (I will be more surprised if the Chinese do not find this 4-koma 's offensive )

Here in public toilet (school, train station, etc) we have that lock thingy when you only can take the toilet paper roll out when it's ran out (unless you have janitor's keys). And they even have that spring design so you can only take 3 squares out at a time (there's a trick to get more but a bit time-consuming)

It's not designed so to prevent random guys from going to public toilet and taking every paper roll out for household use ( i hope it's not). Simply to prevent those brats from dumping the whole roll into the toilet and plug the drainage

PS: on a different note, the art of that 4-koma is really familiar, but kinda cute through
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Old 2010-11-24, 22:18   Link #1551
Sumeragi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mindovermatter View Post
What's the Japanese take on what we Americans call "the fifth amendment?"

a huge part of the American justice system is the defendants right to remain silent, but I came across this scene from an anime (thumb nail below) where the family is sitting around eating, and the radio in the background is talking about how a criminal is obstructing justice by not talking, and it got me curious about how this works in Japan

First of all, you mean the Miranda Rights (in the US).

Second, the Miranda Rights extends to only "custodial interrogation," meaning you (usually) do have to talk while in court. The criminal in this case is refusing to talk about anything during the trial, thus obstructing justice.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Samari View Post
How sex-oriented is Japan? Is their birthrate really negative? With all of the horny game shows, JAV stars, panty vending machines, etc., how in the world does Japan have a negative birthrate? This is kind of a serious question, but also funny at the same time. I'm guessing everyone is too busy with work and other responsibilities? Please excuse my ignorance if it's quite apparent on this issue.
There are too many herbivore men who would rather pleasure themselves than go through the trials of actually getting a partner.


Quote:
Originally Posted by risingstar3110 View Post
Here in public toilet (school, train station, etc) we have that lock thingy when you only can take the toilet paper roll out when it's ran out (unless you have janitor's keys). And they even have that spring design so you can only take 3 squares out at a time (there's a trick to get more but a bit time-consuming)
Hence why I always carried my own paper when using the public toilets when living in Japan.

A thing that I liked about Korea: No locks, all the paper you can use. I never use it to clean myself after I do what I need, but it's nice to use for cleaning up my hands afterwards
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Old 2010-11-24, 22:27   Link #1552
Samari
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seitsuki View Post
Not to mention despite all those H-esque things you've mentioned, Japanese society as a whole is still very conservative. Sure attitudes are changing, as do all things, but things such as one night stands/casual dating and sex are still rather frowned upon as immoral and discouraged in lieu of building a proper family.
That's kind of ironic then from a culture standpoint if all these things are allowed freely to be observed amongst the open public.
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Old 2010-11-24, 22:32   Link #1553
Sumeragi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samari View Post
That's kind of ironic then from a culture standpoint if all these things are allowed freely to be observed amongst the open public.
Not really. There is always the gap between what is public morality and private morality. It's just that Japan's gap is more extreme than other cultures.
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Old 2010-11-25, 05:45   Link #1554
Samari
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Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Not really. There is always the gap between what is public morality and private morality. It's just that Japan's gap is more extreme than other cultures.
I think I understand. We in fact have the same thing here.
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Old 2010-11-25, 10:36   Link #1555
mindovermatter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
First of all, you mean the Miranda Rights (in the US).

Second, the Miranda Rights extends to only "custodial interrogation," meaning you (usually) do have to talk while in court. The criminal in this case is refusing to talk about anything during the trial, thus obstructing justice.




from the text of the fifth amendment of the bill of rights
Quote:
nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself
this Miranda right comes from here.
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Old 2010-11-25, 14:35   Link #1556
Autumn Demon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mindovermatter View Post
What's the Japanese take on what we Americans call "the fifth amendment?"
Even though the Japanese constitution was largely written by Americans it is short on the rights of the accused that exist in the US Bill of Rights. While everyone may be entitled to free counsel, police can hold and question a suspect for weeks before the suspect can talk to anyone, including a lawyer. Police interrogations are not recorded by video or audio device (they're recorded in writing) and there have been many instances of police beating false confessions out of innocent people. At the trial stage there is no right to a jury nor a right to meet one's accuser.

Good movie on Japan's justice system based on a true story: Soredemo boku wa yattenai.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
First of all, you mean the Miranda Rights (in the US).
He definitely means the Fifth Amendment. (Ever heard of the phrase, "I plead the Fifth"?) Miranda rights are the right to be informed by police what a defendant's rights are. Miranda rights require police to tell anyone in their custody that they have the right to remain silent, the right to public or private counsel, and the right to a jury by trial (5th, 6th, and 7th amendments). The actual rights come from the US constitution, but the right the be informed what your rights are comes from a Supreme Court decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Second, the Miranda Rights extends to only "custodial interrogation," meaning you (usually) do have to talk while in court. The criminal in this case is refusing to talk about anything during the trial, thus obstructing justice.
No... I don't know where you could have gotten that idea from but it isn't true. A criminal defendant in the US has an absolute right to remain silent during both police interrogation and while in trial. In court a criminal defendant can refuse to take the stand to be questioned. However, if they choose to take the stand to be questioned by their own lawyer in front of the jury then they have waived their right to remain silent and must answer questions from the prosecution (cross examination).
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Old 2010-11-25, 15:30   Link #1557
Vexx
Obey the Darkly Cute ...
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Join Date: Dec 2005
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On a lighter note.... in the "Your Mom" category, meido cafe in Japan go for a new twist:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20101125...20101125062432

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Old 2010-11-25, 15:44   Link #1558
Samari
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
There are too many herbivore men who would rather pleasure themselves than go through the trials of actually getting a partner.
I know, why didn't I think of that.
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Old 2010-11-25, 15:49   Link #1559
thevil1
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I'm assuming that this question has been asked before, but if no one minds, I'll ask again...

How to Japanese in general feel about foreigners?
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Old 2010-11-25, 15:50   Link #1560
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumeragi View Post
Hence why I always carried my own paper when using the public toilets when living in Japan.

A thing that I liked about Korea: No locks, all the paper you can use. I never use it to clean myself after I do what I need, but it's nice to use for cleaning up my hands afterwards
This is why its a "good thing" that all those people hand out advertising toilet tissue packs on the street... and why one should accept them

Quote:
Originally Posted by thevil1
How to Japanese in general feel about foreigners?
In *general*, mostly curiosity or they don't think about them at all unless they encounter one. Many Japanese get nervous because the social rules they're comfortable with may not be known by the foreigner. When you have a complex, somewhat rigid set of protocols - it can be discomforting to encounter someone who may or may not be trying to fit in. Usually, buildings that don't welcome gaijin have had a *bad* experience in the past. The youtube guy's characterization of "gaijin" is really not terribly accurate ... whether the term is negative or not depends on the speaker/tone of voice. Hell, half my wife's family are "white folks who married in" and the term "gaijin" and "hagaijin" is used constantly. At its root it means "outsider" or "not of the body/clan".

But really, I could make the same assertions about *any* homogenous culture (even in the USA) ... all I have to do is wave my arms a lot and take things to the extreme. Japanese kids are scared of "white people" because they rarely see one, duh. This guy lost an opportunity to be a representative many times if we can believe his stories - way too emo.

I used to be a US mailman in an inner city area when I was in college. Long haired white guy in a neighborhood that would go weeks without seeing a white person. Little kids would be frightened of me. Adults would be astonished. Lots of smiling, lots of diplomacy, lots of understanding. One is *always* a dancing bear in this sort of situation and you have to be bright enough to improve perceptions in a friendly way.

Last edited by Vexx; 2010-11-25 at 16:14.
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