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Old 2011-08-23, 10:48   Link #1801
SeijiSensei
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I'm going to answer your question in a slightly different way by recommending shows that I've found instructive about Japanese culture.

As a quick introduction to the representation of Japanese culture in anime and manga, I recommend School Rumble. Consider it a "crash course" that covers the key icons of high school life, all in a very funny package. To name just a few, you'll see school uniforms, bento boxes from girls courting boys, festivals and athletic competitions, the mandatory beach and hot springs episodes, and children who run their own households without any parents around.

I would hope that the last of these is much more common in anime than in real-life!

The supernatural often plays a role in anime and manga. Here I'd recommend watching two very different shows, Mononoke and the more light-hearted Natsume Yuujinchou. Both have an array of serious and comedic portrayals of demons and other supernatural beings.

Another show you might sample is Genji Monogatari Sennenki, an animated re-telling of the Tale of Genji by the Lady Murasaki. The Tale is considered to be the world's first novel in any language and was written a thousand years ago.

Finally I'll suggest the movie, Summer Wars, and the currently-running series Usagi Drop, for their portrayals of extended family life in Japan.
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Old 2011-08-23, 16:15   Link #1802
Guernsey
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I watched Summer Wars and it was a good movie. One thing on extended families, I still don't know all of my cousins and uncles even though I do know osme in my immediate family. My own family has so many aunts, uncles and cousins, its not even funny and even my grandparents don't know them all. Is it true for most people here in this topic?
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Old 2011-08-23, 19:08   Link #1803
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Originally Posted by Guernsey View Post
I watched Summer Wars and it was a good movie. One thing on extended families, I still don't know all of my cousins and uncles even though I do know osme in my immediate family. My own family has so many aunts, uncles and cousins, its not even funny and even my grandparents don't know them all. Is it true for most people here in this topic?
In my father's side of the family, I don't even know everyone. They are so many, some people mistake each other's names. D:
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Old 2011-08-24, 00:14   Link #1804
Saqqara Bird
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Demonstration against Fuji Television
http://jonny-skywalker.blogspot.com/...elevision.html
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Old 2011-08-24, 00:32   Link #1805
calorie
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When is the honorific -chi used? From what I've gathered from the animes it's some sort of -chan for older individuals? Wikipedia doesn't list it at all...
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Old 2011-08-24, 00:46   Link #1806
TheForsaken
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It's not a proper honorific, just one of some ways (like -chin, -tan, ...) to make a (cutesy) nickname of others (mostly girls)
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Old 2011-08-24, 07:00   Link #1807
MakubeX2
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Originally Posted by calorie View Post
When is the honorific -chi used? From what I've gathered from the animes it's some sort of -chan for older individuals? Wikipedia doesn't list it at all...
Notice now toddlers tends to mis-pronouched words when they start talking ?

That's where those werid honorific comes from. (It's plain to see that -tan comes from -san, -Chin from -chan)
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Old 2011-08-30, 01:07   Link #1808
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http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7JT11M20110830

Well... lets hope Yoshihiko Noda will keep his feet out of his mouth and will provide some motivation to get everything back to normal. Incoming Prime Minister.
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Old 2011-08-30, 01:09   Link #1809
SaintessHeart
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Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7JT11M20110830

Well... lets hope Yoshihiko Noda will keep his feet out of his mouth and will provide some motivation to get everything back to normal. Incoming Prime Minister.
I am surprised that Ishihara didn't run for that position.
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Old 2011-09-01, 07:03   Link #1810
Mystique
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IN PICTURES: THE YAKUZA

The dude was lucky, but if they find that he exposed their world to us all, it's his fingers at risk?
I note that they only selected the pictures for the most stereotypical images and stories of the Yakuza, typical sensationalism, eh

But some very nice piccies, do check them out ^^
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Old 2011-09-02, 00:35   Link #1811
Pink Cow
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Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
IN PICTURES: THE YAKUZA

The dude was lucky, but if they find that he exposed their world to us all, it's his fingers at risk?
I note that they only selected the pictures for the most stereotypical images and stories of the Yakuza, typical sensationalism, eh

But some very nice piccies, do check them out ^^
Wow! These are really interesting! I don't think they'll hunt him down, since they let him take pictures. Lol. They probably made some arrangement that he can only show some of the pictures to public and not all of them.

Now I feel like playing Yakuza 3 on my ps3. Lol.
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Old 2011-09-03, 14:34   Link #1812
ChainLegacy
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Originally Posted by Mystique View Post
IN PICTURES: THE YAKUZA

The dude was lucky, but if they find that he exposed their world to us all, it's his fingers at risk?
I note that they only selected the pictures for the most stereotypical images and stories of the Yakuza, typical sensationalism, eh

But some very nice piccies, do check them out ^^
They look like American gang members. As in to say, they look like morons.
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Old 2011-09-04, 02:16   Link #1813
kirayume
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yakuza always appeared everywhere in japan....but when i see the pictures in BBC, even the way they did it were different than the another gangster in several countries. and yakuza is much strictier. :3
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Old 2011-09-04, 09:31   Link #1814
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How strict are they? What separates them fromt he Western mafia, gangs or even the Triad?
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Old 2011-09-04, 10:13   Link #1815
DonQuigleone
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Yakuza are a lot more ingrained in Japan. They've been a part of Japanese society for centuries, and often operate semi openly, even going so far as having offices.

By contrast Triads and the Western Mafias are all secret societies to one degree or another, and generally are more recent developments where they're located, except perhaps for the Mafias in Sicily and Southern Italy.

Given that they're straddling the law, the Yakuza probably need to maintain discipline among their members more. It would be interesting to learn more from other people with a greater knowledge.

That said, all of them deal in much the same businesses, but from my perspective the Yakuza tend to specialise in somewhat "softer" crime, usually loansharking, illegal gambling, sex trade (including legal joints like Hostess clubs). While they do dabble in drugs, I don't think it's the mainstay of their business like it is for western Mafias.
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Old 2011-09-04, 10:47   Link #1816
Tri-ring
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Originally Posted by DonQuigleone View Post
Yakuza are a lot more ingrained in Japan. They've been a part of Japanese society for centuries, and often operate semi openly, even going so far as having offices.

By contrast Triads and the Western Mafias are all secret societies to one degree or another, and generally are more recent developments where they're located, except perhaps for the Mafias in Sicily and Southern Italy.

Given that they're straddling the law, the Yakuza probably need to maintain discipline among their members more. It would be interesting to learn more from other people with a greater knowledge.

That said, all of them deal in much the same businesses, but from my perspective the Yakuza tend to specialise in somewhat "softer" crime, usually loansharking, illegal gambling, sex trade (including legal joints like Hostess clubs). While they do dabble in drugs, I don't think it's the mainstay of their business like it is for western Mafias.
Here is the interesting part, the conservative Yakuzas clans(not all) despise narcotics and was the dam that stopped the import of opium into the Japanese society during the edo period because they saw first hand the devastating result of the drug and understood the repercussion to the economy which at the end will damage their own income. (A lot of Yakuza clans still holds this policy today)
They also were the vengeful force of retaliation as deterrent after the war acting as vigilantes against the US occupation troops that acted out when the police were useless against them (they also collected protection money from the shops and bars as well).
Presently they are the fixers of illegal organ transplants, illegal trash disposal, and human trafficking.
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Old 2011-09-04, 12:33   Link #1817
Vexx
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Japan women's soccer news (from the Japanese perspective) - recent win over S.Korea.

http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/91802.php
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Old 2011-09-04, 16:26   Link #1818
SeijiSensei
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Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
Here is the interesting part, the conservative Yakuzas clans(not all) despise narcotics and was the dam that stopped the import of opium into the Japanese society during the edo period because they saw first hand the devastating result of the drug and understood the repercussion to the economy which at the end will damage their own income. (A lot of Yakuza clans still holds this policy today)
You see similar fights within the Italian mafia portrayed in the Godfather novel and first film. Don Corleone (Brando) does not want to traffic in narcotics despite the enormous profits it offers. He expresses a preference for "harmless" vices like gambling as a source of income. However, this informative article at, of all places, TruTV, suggests that this portrayal of the mafia as resistant to the thrall of narcotics trafficking has little basis in reality. Increased penalties for trafficking made the narcotics business less appealing, especially because they increased the pressure on soldiers to rat on their superiors.

I've always been curious about the accuracy of the portrayal of the Yakuza in the closing arc of Black Lagoon called "Fujiyama Gangster Paradise." Leaving aside the usual BL over-the-top stuff like splitting bullets with katanas, there's a certain nobility and etiquette about the Washimine Group that makes them almost admirable, especially in comparison to Hotel Moscow.
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Old 2011-09-04, 17:29   Link #1819
DonQuigleone
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The main difference that really needs to be focussed on with the Yakuza that sets them apart from other organised crime is their Openness. The typical organised crime group is a secret society, no one knows for sure who is and isn't a member. The Yakuza is not a secret society, it's well known who is and isn't a member, and usually the Yakuza do not directly involve themselves in their criminality (often working through "small time" intermediaries.) For instance, if you watch Kaiji S2, in the most recent arc one of the loan sharks Kaiji has encountered in previous arcs who works for the main Yakuza antagonist, ends out throwing his lot in with him. Furthermore, that Loan shark is not actually a direct member of the Yakuza organisation in question, which is quite typical of the Yakuza I think.

Given all this, the Yakuza generally are highly disciplined and probably keep the worst business at arm's length.

The Yakuza have an interesting relationship with society at large. For instance in the last 2 major earthquakes (Kobe and Tohoku) Yakuza were at the forefront in providing aid to citizens. According to Wiki, they were the only dependable souce of food in the aftermath of the Kobe earthquake, and even hired out a helicopter to do rescue work.

Given all this, the general Yakuza attitude to their protection rackets is that they're charging a feudal "tax". In a sense they view themselves as responsible towards society at large.

Perhaps the Yakuza are also one of the reasons Japan has such a low crime rate, given the Yakuza's huge size (~100,000 members, according to wiki) a criminal might be hesitant to make trouble in Japan.
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Old 2011-09-07, 04:18   Link #1820
NoemiChan
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Smile Confession of Love in Japan

Hi, I always watch and rewatch animes.... and most of them (romance genres) it is always the girls that do the confession.

Is this really true? Well , I 'll be shocked if a girl would do that to me and thinking I'm a guy and showed be the one doing it to her.
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