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Old 2011-09-07, 04:31   Link #1821
Marcus H.
Hunk o' Burning Love
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
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About the Yakuza, I think what sets them apart from a stereotypical gang in America, for example, is that they do a lot of good things upfront. I've watched Kamisama no Memochou, and they show that Yakuza groups can be asked to act as security for certain events, and as many have mentioned, they are closer to a college fraternity than a gang.
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Old 2011-09-07, 09:00   Link #1822
MakubeX2
うるとらぺど
 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus H. View Post
About the Yakuza, I think what sets them apart from a stereotypical gang in America, for example, is that they do a lot of good things upfront.
Anyone can do various forms of charity at the appropiate time to make themselves looks good.

Quote:
I've watched Kamisama no Memochou, and they show that Yakuza groups can be asked to act as security for certain events, and as many have mentioned, they are closer to a college fraternity than a gang.
Make no mistake, the Yakuza is still the mob. They commit crimes, is relentless and takes no pity on anyone who pissed them off. Believe me, they will hunt you down to the ends of the earth and leave no trails.

Case in point :-
Quote:
Yakuza Attack

On May 22, 1992, six days after the release of his anti-yakuza satire Minbo no Onna, Itami was attacked, beaten, and slashed on the face by five members of the Goto-gumi, a Shizuoka-based yakuza clan, who were angry at Itami's portrayal of yakuza as bullies and thugs in the film. This attack led to a government crackdown on the yakuza. His subsequent stay in a hospital inspired his next film Daibyonin, a grim satire on the Japanese health system.

Death

He purportedly committed suicide on December 20, 1997 in Tokyo, by leaping from the roof of the building where his office was located, after a sex scandal he was allegedly involved in was picked up by the press. The suicide letter he reportedly left behind denied any involvement in such an affair.

Many consider his death suspicious. Citing unnamed sources, Jake Adelstein of Yomiuri Shimbun, who wrote a number of articles dealing with Japanese yakuza, directly accused Goto of murder. Adelstein stated that Jūzō Itami was planning a new movie about Goto's yakuza faction and its relationship with the religious group Sōka Gakkai and that "A gang of five of his people grabbed Itami and made him jump off a rooftop at gunpoint. That’s how he committed suicide." At the time, the police treated it as a possible homicide. Itami's surviving family have remained silent on the circumstances surrounding his death.
Source:-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juzo_Itami
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Old 2011-09-07, 14:05   Link #1823
DonQuigleone
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Join Date: Dec 2007
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I've always wondered what Yakuza think of their protrayals in films? Do they like their commonly portrayed "honour" and whatnot. How do they feel about also being commonly portrayed as ruthless villains?

It would also be interesting to know how triads feel about their treatment in Hong Kong Films.

From what I heard, the Mafia are fans of western gangster films, like the Godfather or Goodfellas.
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Old 2011-09-07, 17:36   Link #1824
Vexx
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Quote:
On May 22, 1992, six days after the release of his anti-yakuza satire Minbo no Onna, Itami was attacked, beaten, and slashed on the face by five members of the Goto-gumi, a Shizuoka-based yakuza clan, who were angry at Itami's portrayal of yakuza as bullies and thugs in the film.
You know... its always remarkable about how that sort of response doesn't lend credence to their case.
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Old 2011-09-07, 19:08   Link #1825
Marcus H.
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@MakubeX2
You have a point, but that "good side" appears to be interesting, since they are always seen as the stereotypical kind, beating up people and mutilating them to make a point. (I'm kinda tired of that side of the Yakuza.)
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Old 2011-09-07, 19:44   Link #1826
ChainLegacy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
You know... its always remarkable about how that sort of response doesn't lend credence to their case.
I mean, if they're willing to do that, why object to being labelled a thug in the first place? Like I said in the last page, morons. There's some cool history behind the Yakuza, but anyone willing to risk their lives being involved with this nonsense needs their head examined by a revolving team of the best psychiatric staff available on the planet.
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Old 2011-09-07, 20:27   Link #1827
DonQuigleone
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Most Yakuza come from the poorest sectors of society, and from groups that are generally outcasts of Japanese society. For instance Burakumin make up something like 60-70% of the Yakuza while Japanese Koreans make up 10%. Likewise the Yakuza usually recruit from street gangs and what not. For the people who joined the Yakuza it probably presented them the best opportunity for a rich and prosperous life.

Join the Yakuza: We're an equal opportunity employer!
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Old 2011-09-13, 22:35   Link #1828
Guernsey
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Getting involved in any gang/mafia is a danger to your life and the life of your loved ones.
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Old 2011-09-13, 23:07   Link #1829
Kudryavka
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Speaking of Koreans in Japan, when did most of them get there? And is it true that they and other minorities, like the burakumin, don't get much attention in the media? Why did many Koreans choose to stay in Japan instead of returning to Korea?
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Old 2011-09-14, 05:19   Link #1830
Tri-ring
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Originally Posted by Komari View Post
Speaking of Koreans in Japan, when did most of them get there? And is it true that they and other minorities, like the burakumin, don't get much attention in the media? Why did many Koreans choose to stay in Japan instead of returning to Korea?
Under the 40 years rule I believe there were no concentrated migration period. Many before the war came on their own free will in search of jobs. During WW2 many were brought over as forced labor but most of these people left Japan as soon as the war ended.
As for the reason for staying I believe there were many reasons based on political, economic and/or personal reasons which cannot be lumped into one swooping answer.
As for burakumin, the story is a lot more complicated then the media reports which again cannot be compiled into a single general statement.
That is all I can say.
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Old 2011-09-14, 10:08   Link #1831
Sumeragi
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Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
Under the 40 years rule I believe there were no concentrated migration period. Many before the war came on their own free will in search of jobs. During WW2 many were brought over as forced labor but most of these people left Japan as soon as the war ended.
About 2/3 of the entire Zainichi Koreans were in Japan after the Sino-Japanese War started, with half of the overall numbers starting after the Pacific War. About 1/3 of the total were conscription.

However, numbers can deceive, since almost all of the Zainichi Koreans starting from 1937 came through official recruitment to fill the labor gap after sending all those men to war.
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Old 2011-09-15, 01:51   Link #1832
Vexx
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The guy who runs J-list.com blogs about his life in and out of Japan. He had some interesting comments and ideas about japanese pop culture, otaku, and fans I'll just excerpt what he wrote -

Quote:
The other day I caught a CNN blog post about the term otaku, and whether it was a positive or negative label in Japan -- arigatou for the link to J-List, guys! Originally a formal word which means "you" or "your family," the word otaku came to describe people who pursue their hobbies -- generally manga, anime and related media -- to the point of obsession. As a general rule, non-Japanese who grew up after the release of the Space Invaders coin-op game in June 1978 -- which I define as "the point when everything cool started flowing from Japan" -- will probably have a positive view of the term otaku, but in Japan this is not always the case. Here the word often carries a negative connotation, despite the recent rise in famous personalities like Shoko Nakagawa, Kill Bill star Chiaki Kurimiya and Gackt being open about their otaku lifestyle. While I would probably advise most gaijin who deal with Japanese people to get to know them a bit before "coming out of the closet," you probably won't need to: these days, Japanese practically expect any given foreigner they encounter to be extremely knowledgable about all forms of Japanese pop culture. Maybe what we need is a new word that doesn't have a negative meaning. Perhaps something like tsuu (aficionado, used to refer to the most passionate fans of Kabuki or Takarazuka theatre), or "mania" (a lightly softer term for someone who really loves their hobby, e.g. tetsudo mania for "railfan").
Personally, I like "tsuu" though it doesn't roll off the tongue easily for Westerners.
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Old 2011-09-15, 03:53   Link #1833
solomon
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I was under the impression that if you were a foriegner anime fan but didnt want to be treated like a Steve Urkel like parasite, you'd just say you were an "anime-mania"

That is of course after you were very comfortable with the people you were with.
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Old 2011-09-15, 10:23   Link #1834
ChainLegacy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
The guy who runs J-list.com blogs about his life in and out of Japan. He had some interesting comments and ideas about japanese pop culture, otaku, and fans I'll just excerpt what he wrote -



Personally, I like "tsuu" though it doesn't roll off the tongue easily for Westerners.
A Japanese girl in one of my college classes once defined the word as she saw it (it was a Japanese literature class, so somehow the topic came up). She used only the word 'obsessed.' I'm not sure, though, if maybe she just didn't have the capacity to describe it any more completely than that in English.
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Old 2011-09-15, 19:42   Link #1835
Kudryavka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
The guy who runs J-list.com blogs about his life in and out of Japan. He had some interesting comments and ideas about japanese pop culture, otaku, and fans I'll just excerpt what he wrote -



Personally, I like "tsuu" though it doesn't roll off the tongue easily for Westerners.
I like "tsuu" too, it sounds nice, a soft sound.
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Old 2011-09-15, 22:04   Link #1836
Kylaran
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From my experience, it's highly likely you'll meet Japanese people who'll poke fun at the stereotype that most people who are interested in Japan nowadays are otaku. This also means that admitting to anything like "being an otaku" is perfectly fine. At the same time however, they don't expect you to be the disgusting sort of otaku that most people have a negative view of (those that stay home all day long and lack social skills), so it's somewhat of a fine line to be walking on.
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Old 2011-09-16, 01:27   Link #1837
Vexx
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Decided this was more appropriate here given the location of the crime

http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/92020.php
Quote:
A man who admitted to taking several million yen from a ticket vending machine at the Yushukan war museum within Tokyo's Yasukuni Shrine was arrested on Sept. 14, police said...
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Old 2011-09-16, 10:54   Link #1838
Sumeragi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Decided this was more appropriate here given the location of the crime

http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/92020.php
Nice going

I've always hated that disgrace of a self-called "museum".
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Old 2011-09-16, 17:51   Link #1839
Terrestrial Dream
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
Decided this was more appropriate here given the location of the crime

http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/92020.php
Give that man a medal!
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Old 2011-09-21, 20:59   Link #1840
Vexx
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15014228

Typhoon Roke rolling over Japan (think of all those anime with the ubiquitous typhoon episode), sadly this one is being deadly for some and a mess for those already dealing with the tsunami aftermath.
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