AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > Anime Related Topics > General Anime

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2007-10-20, 23:32   Link #61
sibladeko
Cynical Romantic
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Age: 30
Spoiler for More random trends that may or may not be worth posting on. :
sibladeko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-04-19, 04:51   Link #62
5parrowhawk
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
A couple more additions to the Nicovideo lexicon

"Hoihoi" (ホイホイ) - a roach motel. In the context of Nico Nico Douga, a "hoihoi" is a video which is expected to attract large numbers of a certain type of user. Some examples are "shooter hoihoi" (referring to shmup fans), "fujoshi hoihoi", and most popularly "ossan hoihoi". Since this is the internet, anyone over 20 is automatically a geezer (ossan), so any video which references retrogames or retro-anime (i.e. anything from more than about 10 years ago) is very likely to be tagged "ossan hoihoi". Unlike the previous example, "hoihoi" videos usually do deliver on the promised content.

"(ry" - Short form for "ryaku", which translates to "abbreviated" or "summarized". Something like the English "etc", except that (ry is most often seen as a way to abbreviate the name of a meme. Example: "Marisa stole (ry"
5parrowhawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-04-21, 02:57   Link #63
Asamidori
ボカロ廃
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Underground
"(ry"'s use is not only limited to Nico, but Japanese community in general, along with things like wktk and ktkr. (Mostly around blogs and 2ch, though.)
__________________
MyList: Recommended Vocaloid Songs
VOCALOID | VOCALOID2
Asamidori is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-04-23, 02:38   Link #64
Quarkboy
Anime Translator
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Age: 34
Send a message via AIM to Quarkboy
More niconico douga words:

Nakamuraya! 中村屋 and it's more recent variation Shameimaru! \射命丸/

Originating from a flash animation, which was in turn created from a comedy track off a CD by the musical comedy group グループ魂 called GROOPER whose basic joke was:

A man tries to give a standard speech at a wedding party, but a couple guys in the audience act as if it's a kabuki performance and constantly do kakegoe (shouting the person's name, in this case "Nakamura" (with an extra kabuki style honorific -ya))... but kakegoe is a lot more complex than just the name and you can shout out things that sound similar to the name or, well in any case the original of the joke is in kabuki.

The flash video was somewhat popular on niconico, but a recent parody version with Aya Shameimaru from Touhou has eclipsed the original in popularity and any appearence of Aya in videos will often be met with the \射命丸/ comment, which, as you can see from this twisted history I uncovered, actually a traditional Kabuki kakegoe.
__________________
Yomiuri Television Enterprise
International Media Strategy Chief
Sam Pinansky
Quarkboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-04-26, 07:27   Link #65
Chrono Helix
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
I learnt somewhere that ネタバレ means spoilers. What is the origin of this term?
Chrono Helix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-04-26, 11:59   Link #66
wao
OK.
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Fields of High Attus
Age: 24
I'm sure there's a more detailed etymology of that term, but afaik it literally means what it is: neta (ネタ) meaning something like "content", "stuff", "material" and bare (バレ) meaning "exposed". Put them together and you have "content exposed" = spoiler.

I'd like to know when it first started being used and so on though. I don't think it's a particularly anime-confined term either... I think.
__________________
Thanks for the fish
wao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-05-02, 00:27   Link #67
LiberLibri
(`◉◞౪◟◉)
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan
Send a message via AIM to LiberLibri
Quote:
Originally Posted by wao View Post
I'd like to know when it first started being used and so on though. I don't think it's a particularly anime-confined term either... I think.
ネタ derived from タネ (tane/seed). You find often upside-down slangs in Japanese. Neta was originally used by suchi cooks during Edo era to suggest the material of sushi, then introduced to comedy actors as a word to point the kernel of their jokes.
LiberLibri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-06-07, 19:41   Link #68
arnquist
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Thanks for all the info, I read almost all of it, very educational. Now I'll know what wktk and 乙 and other such things mean when they fly across the screen of a nico video ^_^
My google search for "japanese internet lingo" also turned up this list:
http://whatjapanthinks.com/2006/11/1...-the-internet/
Can you elaborate on any of those?
arnquist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-06-07, 22:59   Link #69
Asamidori
ボカロ廃
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Underground
lol... 自演's on top of w. And heh apparently that guy's not that familiar with the ones at the bottom.


16 - 厨 nowadays refer to more than just middle school students, but kinda includes the meaning of "fanboys" and "fangirls", too. *points at her own forum title*

19 - 祭り is just that, festival. It doesn't neccessary mean flame wars. Like yesterday night JP/around afternoon today EST, we (the people that was watching/looping) over in あにま's アナザー:ワールドイズマイン was going through a 7万再生祭り 'cause the video broke 70k views. (Think we spammed around 500 to 700 comments in an hour...)

21 - That one literally needs context before it can be explained.

25 - ノシ <- hand. waving goodbye.

26 - Yaoi fangirl. This terms probably more wildly known over here in the west.

27 - Same thing as "wlket5jp;weirtopegh;ksdfas"

28 - (ry - Usually used to shortern stuffs, rather if it's to shortern something normally or used to joke. Whenever I type Marisa, I always go "Marisa wa Taihen na(ry" or something to that degree, because it's long to type, and the fact that most people will know what I'm referring to just from the words typed out.
__________________
MyList: Recommended Vocaloid Songs
VOCALOID | VOCALOID2
Asamidori is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-06-09, 22:20   Link #70
wao
OK.
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Fields of High Attus
Age: 24
Wow, that's an interesting list. I don't think anyone needs it, but these are my own elaborations, based on my own understanding of it. I think some of it is probably just me misunderstanding the author, anyway... and a lot of it is kinda pointless/obvious but I have too much time

Spoiler:



Of course only after writing all that nonsense do I realise it's been explained nicely in the comments section I shall just leave it here and hope someone points out any misunderstandings if any.

Speaking of one I've been tempted to use a lot recently, I came across "2828", which is one of those number-word conversion things meaning "grinning" (niyaniya, 2=ni and 8=ya) I was surprised to see people spamming it on niconico, I didn't know it was widely used in casual internet conversation. (If that is a correct assumption.)
__________________
Thanks for the fish
wao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2008-06-28, 14:20   Link #71
Neya
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rembr View Post
Nice Boat

1. To divert attention from chaos or dissatisfaction.
2. To comment that the boat looks cool.
3. Increase of total aired episodes.
4. To erase from existence (into kuro-rekishi).
5. A synonym of the f-word, but cannot be inflected into an adjective or adverb.
Neya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-04-12, 13:37   Link #72
einhorn303
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: United States of America
The English version of AkibaBlog has a series on otaku terminology for foreginers called "WeeklyAkibaWords." It's rather interesting, a lot of the stuff I'd never heard of before. This weeks:

http://en.akibablog.net/archives/200...one_shoho.html
__________________
Avatar: Helma Lennartz from Strike Witches, art by Shimada Humikane (島田 フミカネ).
einhorn303 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-06-07, 19:39   Link #73
Sister Princess
Easy Operation
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Age: 30
What's the proper english term for "中二病"?
Sister Princess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-07-02, 14:31   Link #74
KitsuneNineTails
赤い狐
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Colorful Colorado
Age: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sister Princess View Post
What's the proper english term for "中二病"?
According to Denshi Jisho:

中二病 / ちゅうにびょう / humorous way of characterising certain expressions or behaviors that are characteristic of teenagers (lit: 11th grader sickness)

Although, wouldn't it be "8th grader sickness", because of chuuni?

Anyways, there ya go. I don't think we have an exact term for this in English, unless there's some new slang I'm not aware of...

Ciao!
__________________
"Symmetrical book stacking... Just like the Philadelphia Mass Turbulence of 1947!"
"You're right, no HUMAN BEING would stack books like this."
KitsuneNineTails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-08-06, 20:46   Link #75
Kei_T
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Kyoto,JAPAN
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sister Princess View Post
What's the proper english term for "中二病"?
I discussed it with my Japanese friends, and one of them called it "the Dark Force syndrome".

Sufferers from 中二病 loves these words ; dark, outlaw, chosen, forbidden, and so on.
"I know, they don't want to be Jedi, but the Lord of Sith." he said.
Kei_T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2009-11-11, 14:25   Link #76
solomon
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Suburban DC
Light Novel Question

Sorry if this has been asked already.

I already know what they are. On average what is the overall length, word count and comprehension difficulty. From reviews I read on the internet, they basically read like anime scripts (which can sometimes be expository heavy compared to regular film/tv).
solomon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-03-29, 05:11   Link #77
NeoSam
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Age: 33
つるぺた
Tsurupeta

Taken from here:

Quote:
It is a Japanese portmanteau word combining two onomatopoeias: tsurutsuru [つるつる], which means smooth, polished, especially hairless; and petan [ぺたん], which means flat, devoid of bumps and holes. So tsurupeta [つるぺた] describes a female body that's flat above and smooth below.
__________________
NeoSam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-04-11, 10:05   Link #78
ellifeedn
Thinker
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New York
I can't believe no one explained doujins. The best I can describe them (and know about them) is that they are fan made material.

Oh, and does anyone know what "M-C" is/means?
ellifeedn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-07-05, 02:19   Link #79
Kudryavka
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellifeedn View Post
I can't believe no one explained doujins. The best I can describe them (and know about them) is that they are fan made material.

Oh, and does anyone know what "M-C" is/means?
Master of Ceremonies. The host of a party or awards party/show.
Kudryavka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-07-06, 22:56   Link #80
Micchi
兄さんが望むなら...
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellifeedn View Post
Oh, and does anyone know what "M-C" is/means?
It could also mean 'Main Character', depending on the context.
__________________
Micchi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
wiki candidate

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:47.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
We use Silk.