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Old 2007-03-29, 01:49   Link #1
remase2
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Join Date: May 2004
oem

i what to buy a window xp pro oem disc. when i buy the disc do i need any thing extra or just the disc and what ever it comes with?
i got a new pc that everyone helped me to build and i need to put on a new windows xp software on it because i used my windows xp home edition cd and i couldn't activate it. i need a new product key causing a $100 so i thought to get a totally new cd and install window xp pro but not sure if i can just buy the cd or do i need to buy the cd and a ... cd drive or hard drive?

I know what i am writing here seems abit random but i am really don't know about oem software.

Also i have bin looking for rca 1/8" inch rca cable to connect my pc and tv/stereo [has same connection] in like 16-20 ft.
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Old 2007-03-29, 02:02   Link #2
Ledgem
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Did you buy the Home edition CD on your own? If so, you could just call Microsoft and explain that you upgraded your PC and now you need a new key. If you tell them that you made an entirely separate system, they may not give you a new key, because technically then you'd have two copies of XP.

As for what else you'd need for your computer... well, that depends on what's in it. Note also that OEM editions of things are generally parts that you'd see bundled with other hardware; hence, they won't come in the retail boxes, or with the instruction manuals. I don't know if it's possible to buy an OEM version of Windows. It's probably hard enough to find a retail copy of Windows XP at this point, since Windows Vista has been released. An OEM copy of software would be no different than the retail version, though. If you don't have a CD drive, then you'd need a CD drive in order to install Windows off of a CD. If you don't have a hard drive, you'll need one regardless of what operating system you want to run, because a hard drive is an essential component of the computer.
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Old 2007-03-29, 02:46   Link #3
Vexx
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Some computer parts suppliers have arrangements with Microsoft and sell OEM copies of Windows (my local supplier does.. .they're a Microsoft Partner).

Perfectly legit .... if you have one they may still have a few copies of XP available. They install just like any other OS.

You don't need to buy a special cd-player or hard drive (and hopefully you bought those when you assembled your computer..... ). ???
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Old 2007-04-05, 09:56   Link #4
remase2
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i spoke to sales person at bestbuy and he told me that with a oem version you aren't able to do a clean install.
i don't fully understand what that means, though i am thinking that it means if you format your harddrive and try to reinstall the oem version that it won't do it properly.
Also my activation period for my oem home edition software expired and i when i logged off the computer won't let me log on on less i activate the software by buying a new product key.

Is it possible for me to format my harddrive without activating the software?
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Old 2007-04-05, 10:20   Link #5
Vexx
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The sales person at "Best Buy" is a misleading moron. His advice was total bullshit. Undoubtedly, he wants to sell you a full retail cost version. I have *never* had such an issue and I've home-built for me, clients, and friends .... at least 40 computers now with XP and upgraded half them significantly in the last 2 years.

If you're going to be assembling your own computer at all.... avoid retailers like Best Buy, CompUSA and don't assume their sales personnel can find the toilet paper much less provide technical support. Unless you live in a really resource-limited area there should be several computer parts and OEM suppliers in your area. Find them in the yellow pages. They can both provide technical advice or (usually) fix things up for you for an hour or two worth of labor.

So are you saying you *lost* your product key for your OEM home edition software? You could re-install the software to start the process over again (which would reformat the hard drive if you choose wisely in the setup). That would give you another 30 days to either find your key or if your activation is saying "no" then call Microsoft and explain you've *upgraded* your computer and need a waiver.

Watch this episode of Weebl&Bob for a full explanation of Best Buy and its clones ...
http://www.weebl.jolt.co.uk/upgrade%202.htm

For that matter, read the whole flashcomic series from ep 1 for an enjoyable waste of two or three hours
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Old 2007-04-05, 15:10   Link #6
rooboy
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Vexx is right, the Best Buy guy doesn't know what he's talking about. Dell sends OEM CDs with their computers (or, at least, they used to), and they install just like normal CDs. The only difference I'm aware of is that Microsoft waives your first thirty days of free support if you're using an OEM copy.

Activation should not require purchasing a new product key. If necessary call the number and tell them you upgraded your computer, they'll give you a key to enter in the window that will unlock it.
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Old 2007-04-05, 16:05   Link #7
bayoab
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I have a feeling the bestbuy guy knew what he was trying to say, but it didn't get across clearly. Dell (and most other major computer distros) have stopped sending full XP install discs for a few years now. They only send reinstall CDs (Format+reload). Therefore, you cannot do a true clean install, only a wipe and reload with their default settings on that disc. Some of these CDs (like Toshiba and HP) are not even close to clean installs. Some like Dell are almost clean installs.
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Old 2007-04-05, 16:23   Link #8
Vexx
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Hmmm, but those "re-install" disks aren't OEMs. The OEMs I get from my Microsoft Provider and parts supply shop is a full version of the OS without the Dell/AOL/Gateway crapola/spam/adware crap. One example is an XP Pro OEM priced at $154. The pseudo-equivalent Vista Business is the same price and the "Ultimate" is $213. (I'm still trying to figure out what exact functions are left out of Business vs Ultimate -- their main website defines them by "who needs them" not "what functions", there's probably a lurking KB article that actually lists the differences... I hope)

Yes, the crippled "re-install" disks that come with pre-built computers are "teh 3v1L"....
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Old 2007-04-05, 19:43   Link #9
Ledgem
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He may have just been referring to the licensing scheme. Technically, I don't believe the OEM license is supposed to be transferrable, and usually it's already bundled with a computer. In other words, you're not supposed to be able to use the CD key that came with one computer on an install of another, even if the original computer is no longer being used. It sounds ridiculous, and in my opinion, it is. This is why a lot of people have issues with software licensing policies.

If you're able to buy a stand-alone copy of Windows, not bound to any hardware, then the licensing should still be on your side.

If not, as Vexx said, call up Microsoft and explain the situation. Even in cases where people were technically wrong, I've heard that Microsoft is pretty generous about handing out a new key. It's worth a shot.
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Old 2007-04-06, 02:03   Link #10
remase2
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I have a laptop that i reformatted the hard drive and reinstalled the xp home edition software which is a oem that i got bundled with other software when the computer came. Ever since then the shutdown function does not work correctly.

if i close my screen the computer goes into shutdown mode but when i reopen it the computer runs mess up. i press a key and there is no response then the window freezes. I have to restart the computer before it runs correctly.

Also what is a clean install vs. when you reformat and restall windows with a oem cd?

There must be some reason for the almost $100 difference between the oem and retail version besides the store needing to make a profit.
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Old 2007-04-06, 07:52   Link #11
bayoab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remase2 View Post
I have a laptop that i reformatted the hard drive and reinstalled the xp home edition software which is a oem that i got bundled with other software when the computer came. Ever since then the shutdown function does not work correctly.

if i close my screen the computer goes into shutdown mode but when i reopen it the computer runs mess up. i press a key and there is no response then the window freezes. I have to restart the computer before it runs correctly.
This doesn't sound like shutdown, this sounds like hibernate/save-to-disk mode/suspend mode. You can change the behavior in the bios or sometimes in the power settings in windows (depends on your system). Fixing it is harder and depends on a lot of things.

Quote:
Also what is a clean install vs. when you reformat and restall windows with a oem cd?
If it's a plain OEM cd, there is no difference. However, most of the CDs that come with your computer are either hardware locked or have slightly modified installers.
Quote:
There must be some reason for the almost $100 difference between the oem and retail version besides the store needing to make a profit.
As said earlier in the thread, there is a huge difference in the licensing rules (where, how, how many times, etc) and how the software can be sold.
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Old 2007-04-06, 07:54   Link #12
rooboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ledgem View Post
He may have just been referring to the licensing scheme. Technically, I don't believe the OEM license is supposed to be transferrable, and usually it's already bundled with a computer. In other words, you're not supposed to be able to use the CD key that came with one computer on an install of another, even if the original computer is no longer being used. It sounds ridiculous, and in my opinion, it is. This is why a lot of people have issues with software licensing policies.
This is true, your OEM copy is supposed to be tied to your motherboard (of all things). If you change your motherboard, the license is not supposed to be transferred.
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Old 2007-04-07, 04:50   Link #13
Vexx
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Interestingly though.... I've changed the mobo out (usually blown board or switching from AGP to an PCI-Ex board) on a few systems and never encountered any resistance from the activation sequence. I'll ask my supplier what their "no hardware requirements" OEM packages actually mean next time I'm in.

I did have to call once on a client who had torturously changed things one at a time and after 5+ times of installing (no, I don't want to know why he thought that was fun) it wanted him to phone the mothership. After he explained (and they stopped laughing I'm sure), they cleared him for continuance.
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Old 2007-04-09, 09:46   Link #14
rooboy
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Activation does not equal the license.

Activation runs on some kind of complicated mathematical formula where it turns the components of your PC into a hash and if too many of them change then it asks you to re-activate (I've never actually had this happen anywhere that I've seen. Most OEMs use SLP to bypass this part of activation by locking it to the BIOS key). Otherwise it only ever asks you to activate when first setting up (or when reinstalling).

The OEM license states that it cannot be transferred to "another computer". Which, according to the posts in the linked blog entry (I linked the blog entry rather than having to copy his fifteen or so links myself) Microsoft has defined as the motherboard (obviously not in situations where the motherboard itself has failed). At any rate, having worked in that industry for quite a while (my wife actually did technical support for Windows 95 right after we were married - wow, I just dated myself ), I can pretty much guarantee that you could probably call their activation line and get your computer re-activated for next to nothing in the way of explanation even if you did upgrade the motherboard.
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Old 2007-04-09, 20:50   Link #15
Vexx
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Ah, that clarifies the nuances... though "another computer" is a really tenuous thing when it comes to home-builts that are in some continuous stream of being upgraded or failure replacement (how on earth would they verify that anyway?).

I just make sure any license I have is on only one machine at any given point in time.
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