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Old 2006-11-18, 11:49   Link #1
stormy001_M1A2
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Korean Animation has come a long way.

Fixed Link

I just couldn't help it, but have to share this link with the forum. The art for its time is not bad but the story execution is quite odd.
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Old 2006-11-18, 14:00   Link #2
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Fix t3h link please.

Korean studios still live under the shadow of animating for American cartoons.
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Old 2006-11-18, 17:13   Link #3
stormy001_M1A2
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Link fixed. Sorry.
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Old 2006-11-18, 17:38   Link #4
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ROFL. That clip was indeed hilarious.

Yes, a lot of American and Japanese cartoons "outsource" their actual animation to Korean studios. I've noticed this a lot when watching the credits.
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Old 2006-11-18, 19:14   Link #5
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Ya I think Manhwa has come along way. Of corse its a little higher then manga. But I thing its just as good as manga.

note: Manhwa is $10.99 instead of manga that $9.99
But thats for english.
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Old 2006-11-19, 01:33   Link #6
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It has came a long way. Killer rats?
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Old 2006-11-19, 06:48   Link #7
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LOL @ The gundam shout. That was hillarious. And notice that his uniform changed once he got inside the mecha.
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Old 2006-12-09, 12:45   Link #8
sukreih
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OMG SPACE GUNDAM V!!Yea Korean animation back in those days were complete mix and mix fake versions of Japanese robot anime.That's what makes them hilarious..(I guarantee you can laugh your ass off watching 'Space Black Knight' with your Japanese pals..)

However there were some unique ones,most of them based on manhwa.(they were pretty good,too.)But you can pretty much say that the robot ones were all like that.
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Old 2006-12-09, 13:59   Link #9
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I only watched 1 korean animation "Wonderful Days". I think that's the name..
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Old 2006-12-09, 19:51   Link #10
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I've often heard that Korean don't like Japanese and the gavament still do anti Japnese campaign but then why they want to duplicate Japanese style and don't make their own?
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Old 2006-12-10, 12:26   Link #11
wontaek
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There are many reasons.

1. You cannot ignore the cultural and geographical proximity.

2. Most Korean studios learned their craft under pay of Japanese producers.

3. What is called Japanese style is actually a mix of many animation styles that existed in many countries. The unique thing about it is the reference to Japanese traditions and history as well as plots that is based on Japanese literatures. In fact, although Japanese will never admit it, many manga art styles originated from Korea. Many artists from both countries secretly studied copied the works from the other country and passed it off as their own unique style after some small modifications.

4. Despite all their nationalistic speech and Anti-Japanese comments, most of rich and powerful people in Korea has accumulated their wealth during Japanese occupation of Korea. They have tendency to believe anything Japanese to be superior to things that originated from Korea, although they will hide this belief from the public.

5. Despite all this, their are big difference in plot and character developements. Although they may look similar if you only see a Screen capture, the flow of dialogue and scenes are very different.

6. The reason why Koreans have hard feelings about Japanese is that although Japanese committed many atrocities that resembles their ally, Nazi Germany, Japanese still dismiss it as a myth and USA and Europe ignores these historical events: Despite killing millions of Chinese and forcing inhumane acts on hundreds of thousands of Koreans, you won't see much more than foot note about this in most books published in USA, while you will see many books lauding how a Japanese diplomat saved thousands of Jews. Korea is not alone in this antipathy towards Japan: The biggest reason why China never became a major naval power was the pillaging of Japanese Pirates who wrought greater devastation than Vikings did in Europe.

7. In end, Korea just doesn't have the money.

8. Because of #7, Korean education system fails to give adequate time to Korean music, arts, traditions, history, and literatures. This is the biggest reason why Korean companies and mass media is prone to copy things that are Japanese.
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Old 2006-12-10, 18:54   Link #12
Tenki
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http://nandakorea.sakura.ne.jp/html/trace.html

Original Japanese version → korean copy version
korean copy version ← Original Japanese version

and because of why manwha looks almost as same as  manga.
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Old 2006-12-10, 19:08   Link #13
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I agree with #8 and what I meant Korean want to depl icate Japanese style was in the Japanese site avob e. Sorry、I was going to write this first 
but it didn't go with my comment above.
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Old 2006-12-11, 03:28   Link #14
wontaek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenki View Post
http://nandakorea.sakura.ne.jp/html/trace.html

Original Japanese version → korean copy version
korean copy version ← Original Japanese version

and because of why manwha looks almost as same as  manga.
Tenki, Please answer all the questions I will list. I also welcome other to think about my questions and give me your opinions about them.

First and for most, Please explain about the top page of the site you linked.
http://nandakorea.sakura.ne.jp/frame.html


2. How many Korean Manwha have you read?
3. Have you seen the works by Korean Manwha artist named Hwang, Mina ( Debut 1980 )? Please check the date of her works. You will see that she precedes Mamoru Nagano ( 5 star stories - 1986 ) yet why are their character designs so similar?
4. Many Koreans are guilty of copying Japanese works but most of the copiers are not what you call 1st tier artist. Try to find something that resembles plotlines and/or comedy found in works by Go Yusung ( Robot King series ), Go Wooyung ( Romance of Three Kingdoms and countless other works based on famous Chinese history novels and Korean Folklores ), Gwun Gyojung ( Diotima and other works ), Kim Jin ( Country of Wind ), Kang Gyung Ok ( Normal City ), Kim Hye rin ( Bi Chun Mu - meaning Flying Sky Dance ), Shin Il Suk ( 4 daughters of Armian ), Yi Je Hak ( Fall Soul 12 Swords - meaning 12 sword moves that fells souls ), and Yi Hyun Se ( Fearsome Mercenary Team - this is a famous baseball manwha ). Most of the artist I named achieved their fame during 1980s so most of the similar examples you find in Japanese manga will likely to have been made couple of years after the Korean counterpart.
5. In the 60s and 70s, about 70% of manwha titles were copied from Japanese manga. The interesting thing is, manwha publishers usually copied only about first 2 ~3 volumes and made up the rest. Even more interesting thing is, something that appeared in Korean manwha at beginning of the year as material for 5th volume might show up next year in Japan as 10th volume materials. You will find surprisingly large number of Japanese artist researching comic works made outside of Japan in order to draw upon new inspiration.
6. For more details, please check the following link. What's your relation with kyoteki?
http://www.minaidehazukashii.com/?p=234
7. Unless you claim every manga/manwha artists' style to be unique, even the Japanese manga style has many elements that originated from other countries. Remember that the 1st large scale animated film to be shown internationally was the works by Disney. Also consider the fact that Japanese has copied or recreated many works by D.C. Comics or Marvel Comics: I still remember Japanese manga version of Star Wars and Japanese Spiderman series. There also was a ripoff of Batman in Japanese manga series: Golden Bat was the name they used for Korean version of that manga, and I believe the Japanese version used a similar name.
8. Before 1997, the censorship in Korea was of such that Kang Kyung OK in her Debut masterpiece 'Into the Star light' had a kiss scene where you only see the shadows of the characters. At that time, gore, sex, and nudity was very common in many Japanese works. There are many other examples of difference between Japanese manga and Korean Manwha.

9. Can you give us more articles backing up your statement other than the one you translated from a Korean Sports Newspaper? For those who don't know, that newspaper frequently discuss about UFOs and Scandles by entertainers.

10. Why is it that the website Tenki has linked to cannot be seen from anyone in Korea?
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Last edited by wontaek; 2006-12-11 at 06:48.
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Old 2006-12-11, 09:20   Link #15
sukreih
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Geez,that nandekorea site has some attitude.What's with the disclaimers on the main site? I especially don't get the line that Koreans accept Japanese culture as theirs,and it's very 'recent' that they accepted Japanese culture.Well,if you say after the war is recent..
I don't mind expressing hatred thru your own site,but gotta say it looks really immature..can't it least be neutral or humourous?The fact that the person who made that site blocked Korean IP is stupid.The site's all about Korea copying Japan and that they are bastards.And Koreans are not allowed to see it?(it's like celibrity bashing sites blocking all celibrities lol)I agree that there are some crude net people in Korea,and some are really extreme.But not letting Korean people seeing it looks like just running away from everything.


If the manwha=manga thing is not limited to paperback,I personally think Korean web comic structures are the most advanced than in any country.First time they made the scroll button on the mouse useful. Since seeing a comic on a computer screen is different from original manwha format where you see sideways,they focus on showing the pics and story while you 'scroll down' the screen. And gotta say they're effective. So are Koreans going to condemn every country that uses these formats?I doubt it..
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Old 2006-12-11, 09:34   Link #16
Tenki
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wontaek View Post
Tenki, Please answer all the questions I will list. I also welcome other to think about my questions and give me your opinions about them.

First and for most, Please explain about the top page of the site you linked.
http://nandakorea.sakura.ne.jp/frame.html


2. How many Korean Manwha have you read?
3. Have you seen the works by Korean Manwha artist named Hwang, Mina ( Debut 1980 )? Please check the date of her works. You will see that she precedes Mamoru Nagano ( 5 star stories - 1986 ) yet why are their character designs so similar?
4. Many Koreans are guilty of copying Japanese works but most of the copiers are not what you call 1st tier artist. Try to find something that resembles plotlines and/or comedy found in works by Go Yusung ( Robot King series ), Go Wooyung ( Romance of Three Kingdoms and countless other works based on famous Chinese history novels and Korean Folklores ), Gwun Gyojung ( Diotima and other works ), Kim Jin ( Country of Wind ), Kang Gyung Ok ( Normal City ), Kim Hye rin ( Bi Chun Mu - meaning Flying Sky Dance ), Shin Il Suk ( 4 daughters of Armian ), Yi Je Hak ( Fall Soul 12 Swords - meaning 12 sword moves that fells souls ), and Yi Hyun Se ( Fearsome Mercenary Team - this is a famous baseball manwha ). Most of the artist I named achieved their fame during 1980s so most of the similar examples you find in Japanese manga will likely to have been made couple of years after the Korean counterpart.
5. In the 60s and 70s, about 70% of manwha titles were copied from Japanese manga. The interesting thing is, manwha publishers usually copied only about first 2 ~3 volumes and made up the rest. Even more interesting thing is, something that appeared in Korean manwha at beginning of the year as material for 5th volume might show up next year in Japan as 10th volume materials. You will find surprisingly large number of Japanese artist researching comic works made outside of Japan in order to draw upon new inspiration.
6. For more details, please check the following link. What's your relation with kyoteki?
http://www.minaidehazukashii.com/?p=234
7. Unless you claim every manga/manwha artists' style to be unique, even the Japanese manga style has many elements that originated from other countries. Remember that the 1st large scale animated film to be shown internationally was the works by Disney. Also consider the fact that Japanese has copied or recreated many works by D.C. Comics or Marvel Comics: I still remember Japanese manga version of Star Wars and Japanese Spiderman series. There also was a ripoff of Batman in Japanese manga series: Golden Bat was the name they used for Korean version of that manga, and I believe the Japanese version used a similar name.
8. Before 1997, the censorship in Korea was of such that Kang Kyung OK in her Debut masterpiece 'Into the Star light' had a kiss scene where you only see the shadows of the characters. At that time, gore, sex, and nudity was very common in many Japanese works. There are many other examples of difference between Japanese manga and Korean Manwha.

9. Can you give us more articles backing up your statement other than the one you translated from a Korean Sports Newspaper? For those who don't know, that newspaper frequently discuss about UFOs and Scandles by entertainers.

10. Why is it that the website Tenki has linked to cannot be seen from anyone in Korea?
I'm sorry that I can't answer your questions because I'm not familiar with manwha(neither with manwha history) I have only read KILL ME, KISS ME( Lee-Young-Yuu) and SWEET & SENSITIVE (Park-Eun-Ah) . I thought if I was not told those were manwha I would have believed they were manga (except for they go left to right) because they use same expressions just like manga( like those big swest drops and chibi expressions) so it means I really haven't seen Korean distinctive style manwha like you have wrote avove yet (well. sorry for my ignorance).

I apologize you that I made you feel bad that I said Manwha was inflenced by manga. I just came across the Japanese site and wonderd if Korean society was against Japan how people can accept that their art style was similar to Japanese one. That was my point.

I know that since manga style became more world wide popular and more people like to draw their comics like manga it won't be limited to only Japanese.

#10 If you were in Korea and can not see the site I don't know why you can not see the site from there and also can not answer what you asked me about the site.
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Old 2006-12-11, 10:06   Link #17
sukreih
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenki View Post
I'm sorry that I can't answer your questions because I'm not familiar with manwha(neither with manwha history) I have only read KILL ME, KISS ME( Lee-Young-Yuu) and SWEET & SENSITIVE (Park-Eun-Ah) . I thought if I was not told those were manwha I would have believed they were manga
I agree with you on that point. I think the time where manhwa began to adapt Japanese manga art more and more was after Yi MyungJin(author of Ragnarok) debuted with 'Lights Out'. Until then,Korean artists were reluctant to draw 'manga-ish' pictures,because..you know, they were from Japan.And Japan doesn't have a good impression in Korea.(While Dragon Ball was #1 hit) But Yi MyungJin kindda broke the borders on that. From that time similar styles showed up on Sonyun Champ(where 'Lights Out' was running),and onto other manhwa magazines. Lee YoungYuu and Park EunAh are those 'later' generations. Up to these days,many artists are influenced by the manga style that I agree as a whole.

But as wontaek mentioned above, if you're interested you should check out some works by older manhwa authors. Problem is most of NA licensed manwha are recent ones. (Manhwas are licensed by Tokyopop,licensed company is DaeWon,which owns the Sonyun Champ magazine types.)And they don't license good ones by authors like Kwon GyoJung ,Yu ShiJin,Kim Eunhee,or Hwang Mina!(I think I saw Hwang Mina somewhere..not sure.)And as far as I know those four are still around,and their manhwas are still good.

Last edited by sukreih; 2006-12-11 at 13:55.
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Old 2006-12-11, 17:43   Link #18
wontaek
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I think I need to stress my main point: Even now, many Japanese are influenced by various works of Koreans, as well as Koreans being influenced by Japanese culture. Both culture would benefit much more by reducing their nationalistic tendency and becoming more open to exploring history and traditions of other countries, however.
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Old 2006-12-11, 18:44   Link #19
Tenki
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sukreih View Post
I agree with you on that point. I think the time where manhwa began to adapt Japanese manga art more and more was after Yi MyungJin(author of Ragnarok) debuted with 'Lights Out'. Until then,Korean artists were reluctant to draw 'manga-ish' pictures,because..you know, they were from Japan.And Japan doesn't have a good impression in Korea.(While Dragon Ball was #1 hit) But Yi MyungJin kindda broke the borders on that. From that time similar styles showed up on Sonyun Champ(where 'Lights Out' was running),and onto other manhwa magazines. Lee YoungYuu and Park EunAh are those 'later' generations. Up to these days,many artists are influenced by the manga style that I agree as a whole.

But as wontaek mentioned above, if you're interested you should check out some works by older manhwa authors. Problem is most of NA licensed manwha are recent ones. (Manhwas are licensed by Tokyopop,licensed company is DaeWon,which owns the Sonyun Champ magazine types.)And they don't license good ones by authors like Kwon GyoJung ,Yu ShiJin,Kim Eunhee,or Hwang Mina!(I think I saw Hwang Mina somewhere..not sure.)And as far as I know those four are still around,and their manhwas are still good.
Thanks for the imformation but I couldn't find those names on the net(even if I could they showed really tiny pictures) so if you could link to the sites that I can see those people's art work or the most prominent manhwa artists like Japanese Tezuka or Go Nagai in Korea(who has also influenced Japanese artists like wontaek mentioned) I would appreciate.

So is web comics populare in Korea? do they have English version? it seems they are not populare in Japan.
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Old 2006-12-11, 22:35   Link #20
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For informations regarding Korean Manwha, the following is a good place to start for those who can't read Korean.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhwa
http://www.booksfromkorea.org/books_...bunya=1&no=300
http://www.sicaf.or.kr/2007/2006_eng/2006_main/main.php
http://www.difeca.com/
http://ani.seoul.kr/
http://www.bicof.com/eng-index.php

If you can read French, the following link is much better

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhwa

For those who can read Korean, try these.

http://comic.dreamwiz.com/search.jsp?authorCd=2377
http://jinlove.com/
http://fantaaa.com/woo/main.htm
http://comic.daum.net/search/writerD...AA&writerno=28

Here is the list of manwha that has translation in English

http://www.animeondvd.com/specials/m...hp?view=manhwa

The one I recommend the most among them is Red Moon by Hwang, Mi Na.
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