AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > AnimeSuki & Technology > Tech Support

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2007-04-23, 22:19   Link #1
toru310
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philippines
Wireless router?

Hi, I'll be buying a wireless router(Lynksis I think) in the future..My question now is how fast will be my internet 1 room away..I mean is the one with the cord faster than the wireless one? I'm noob at this hehe
toru310 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-23, 22:33   Link #2
Phantom-Takaya
INTJ
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Alaska
Age: 31
Send a message via AIM to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via MSN to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via Yahoo to Phantom-Takaya
The answer is... "yes." Heh. I know that was a vague answer, so let me clarify. Wired connections are usually faster than wireless ones. I have a wireless router, and I prefer to have the main computer hard wired to the router while I have the other computers on wireless. Of course, the speed of your internet is mostly dependent upon the speed you are subscribing from your internet service provider (ISP). Unless you have steel walls and any other type of objects that can interfere with the transmission (like select cell phones), as well as a large distance between the computer and router, having a wireless computer one room away from the router won't really affect the speed of the connection to the router. The sudden decrease and bandwidth to the point that your computer may think it lost its connection to the internet can be due to the router having "burps" (all routers have these problems, but not very frequently) or another computer using the same router decided to hog all the bandwidth.

Linksys isn't a bad router at all. It has great security features and user control. One warning in advance that I will give you is that if you intend to download torrents, be prepared for the router to suffer from the "burps" more frequently. It's a matter of the router overbuffering. Supposedly Linksys fixed this problem with the newer router, but being one with one of the newer routers and still suffering from such a problem, I find it hard to believe.

Netgear is another router I'll recommend. It doesn't have as much user control as Linksys's routers, but the options Netgear routers contain are just as good. I used to have one and it barely suffered from the overbuffering problem that Linksys routers suffer from.

It's all a matter of preference, so I advice you tp do your research before you purchase one.
__________________
"Even in a crowd, I was always alone." - Ernest Hemmingway
"God asks no man whether he will accept life. That is not the choice. You must take it. The only choice is how." - Henry Ward Beecher
Friend: "Evidence that you guys are made of epic win." Me: "That wasn't my goal. My goal is chaos, fear and...eggs."
Phantom-Takaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 00:17   Link #3
toru310
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philippines
Ermm how about a D-link wireless router???
You mean I can't download torrent with lynksis router? aw hard to believe...I think I had one(not wireless) and I think I can download torrents there but the funny thing is it got broken..ehhe
toru310 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 01:08   Link #4
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migufuchi Fusutsu View Post
Hi, I'll be buying a wireless router(Lynksis I think) in the future..My question now is how fast will be my internet 1 room away..I mean is the one with the cord faster than the wireless one? I'm noob at this hehe
Your Internet connection is almost certainly much slower than either the wireless or wired network you're connecting to it. Modern routers support wireless speeds of 54 MBit (that 54 million zeroes or ones per second) and wired speeds of 100 MBit or even 1000 MBit. In contrast, the speed of US "broadband" Internet services are in the neighborhood of 1-2 MBit. Many countries outside the US have higher-speed connections than these (the US ranks something like 15th in access to high-speed connections), but few of them approach speeds as high as wireless networking, much less wired connections. So I doubt you'll see any appreciable loss of performance connecting to the Internet over a wireless router.

I've seen other people report P-T's problems with Linksys routers and BitTorrent so I'd take his advice seriously. I don't use a commercial router so I can't give any advice on which models perform best.
__________________
SeijiSensei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 01:58   Link #5
Phantom-Takaya
INTJ
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Alaska
Age: 31
Send a message via AIM to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via MSN to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via Yahoo to Phantom-Takaya
Actually, a slight correction regarding the speed of US broadband internet services. It's actually between 1-30mbps. Of course, it costs about $200 a month just to get 30mpbs speed... Well, here in Alaska anyways.

I have yet to try out D-Link's wireless routers, but from what I've heard, compared to Linksys and Netgear's security, it doesn't have as much. But, in exchange for the security, it's extremely user friendly.

You can download torrents with a Linksys router. The problem I was indicating is that routers have memory just like a computer. If it gets overloaded with information, the Linksys router severes it's connections. Any program that use peer-to-peer tend to cause problems for the Linksys routers due to that. I'm simply warning you that you may have random moments of loss of connection that can last from 1 minute to 5 hours or more due to the router reacting to the overloading of data. So when that happens, don't automatically think your router has died. Simply unplug the router for 10 seconds, then plug it back in.
__________________
"Even in a crowd, I was always alone." - Ernest Hemmingway
"God asks no man whether he will accept life. That is not the choice. You must take it. The only choice is how." - Henry Ward Beecher
Friend: "Evidence that you guys are made of epic win." Me: "That wasn't my goal. My goal is chaos, fear and...eggs."
Phantom-Takaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 07:54   Link #6
hobbes_fan
You could say.....
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
I have a Linksys WRT54GL. Just in case you don't know you have to open up a dedicated port obviously, in your router configuration and a static IP on your remote PC. Check your FAQ for your Bittorent client. Don't forget to use an SSID key so people don't leech you connection. But you won't notice the speeds, that's the maximum speed advertised not the real speeds you'll get.

BTW I've never had a problem like what Phantom Takaya advised,
hobbes_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 08:04   Link #7
brood-faun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
http://www.portforward.com/english/a.../Utorindex.htm

This site tells you how to open ports. You might want to check your router make and model.

Last edited by brood-faun; 2007-04-24 at 08:19.
brood-faun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 10:10   Link #8
Phantom-Takaya
INTJ
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Alaska
Age: 31
Send a message via AIM to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via MSN to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via Yahoo to Phantom-Takaya
Port forwarding? That's not what seems to be causing the router to disconnect. I've had port forwarding for the right port for the Bittorrent client from the beginning. As far as I can gather, the solution that Linksys and others seem to offer is to bring down the MTU packet size. I've already done that and my WRT54GS v6 is still having that problem over multiple torrents or torrents with a large amount of seeds and peers. Of course, I didn't think everyone suffers from it. There are a lucky few.
__________________
"Even in a crowd, I was always alone." - Ernest Hemmingway
"God asks no man whether he will accept life. That is not the choice. You must take it. The only choice is how." - Henry Ward Beecher
Friend: "Evidence that you guys are made of epic win." Me: "That wasn't my goal. My goal is chaos, fear and...eggs."
Phantom-Takaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 11:14   Link #9
hobbes_fan
You could say.....
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
No the portforwarding thing wasn't directed at you, it was to the OP. As for your problem not sure man, I assume you've upgraded the firmware? But other than that no clue. Mnd you Australian Broadband is pretty poor n comparison to the the rest of the world even lower than the US rank of 15. The only problem I had was the router was mangling the packets causing massive amounts of hashfails but the firmware upgrade solved that
hobbes_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 12:14   Link #10
ImClueless
Rawr
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Canada
I have a WRT54G v6 with lastest firmware and I occasionally suffer burps as well. However, I don't think its a problem thats limited specifically to Linksys. All wireless routers drop their WAN connections every once in awhile. At least people who own Netgear/D-link have told me they suffer from similar problems.

The problem that was limited to Linksys was that the router would get bricked as in you have to reinstall the firmware or more involved techniques. However, I believe the problem was fixed for v5+ so any new router you buy should be free of this problem.
__________________
ImClueless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 15:46   Link #11
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Mucking about
Age: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom-Takaya View Post
Actually, a slight correction regarding the speed of US broadband internet services. It's actually between 1-30mbps. Of course, it costs about $200 a month just to get 30mpbs speed... Well, here in Alaska anyways.
Most normal humans here in the lower-48 can't touch anything like 30 mbps for $200/month. I live in Verizon FIOS land, and even on that service I think the top downstream speed is 15 mbps. My Comcast connection is pretty fast by US standards, but it's something like 384 kbps up and 6 mbps down. Even the FCC has decided recently that it needs to re-examine its measures of "broadband" access, in part because this country is falling further behind other advanced nations.

If I wanted a symmetric connection, and one that would allow me to have an IP address block and run servers, we're talking something like $400/month for a T1, or about 1.5 mbps.

Edit: This very pertinent discussion appeared on Slashdot today (4/25): Why are T1 Lines Still Expensive?
__________________

Last edited by SeijiSensei; 2007-04-25 at 22:12. Reason: Link to Slashdot discussion
SeijiSensei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-24, 18:13   Link #12
Aird
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
I've found that bittorrent clients has some effect on how often your router "burps" while downloading. I've tried Azureus, BitComet and uTorrent. I've set the amount of connections allowed to be the same for all 3 clients and uTorrent came out the winner. I'm guessing it's how they manage the connections. But in general bittorrent is pretty taxing on commercial home routers.

I guess I must be lucky in terms of broadband speed where I live. FiOs ranges from 5-50 mbit down and 2-5 up from $40-140. Cablevision offers 15-30 mbit down and 2-5 mbit up for $40-70. Although cablevision has a nasty habit of capping upload speed if you excessively upload. They don't allow servers for home service.
Aird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 00:08   Link #13
Ledgem
Love Yourself
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 28
I don't recommend Linksys routers for everyone. I use a WRT54G v5 - the v5 being the first of the line where Linksys drastically cut the onboard flash memory, and stopped using Linux in favor of some proprietary 3rd-party OS that I forgot the name of.

In terms of stability, the router is amazing. I believe mine was up for four months without a reboot before it froze - I'm not positive what set off the freezing. However, as far as P2P-like activity goes, this router is useless. Not only do such programs experience somewhat crippled performance (whether DMZ is on or not), but the router absolutely must be reset after each session of such activity. Otherwise, it acts as if you're on dialup, or worse, it becomes practically unresponsive/incredibly sluggish. Note that I perform this activity through the router's wired connection.

My first wireless router was an Airlink 101; it had amazing range (even better than the Linksys), but the wireless was terribly unstable. Whether you were multiple walls away or right in front of it, the connection would drop every 10-20 minutes. In this regard, the Linksys is wonderful - wireless connections seem to be incredibly stable.

If you're just going to do light web work (browse pages, IM, email, etc.) then the Linksys is great. I picked mine up for $40 or so, and was very happy until I started apparently straining it. I took the issue to the Linksys forum and was surprised how many people reported having the same problem I had, without any real solution appearing. FYI I used multiple firmware versions, but ultimately downgraded back to the version my router shipped with, because the others were causing it to be unstable whether P2P activity was performed or not. I don't mean to scare anyone away too badly from these routers, because it is a pretty solid router... for someone like my mother.

I'm switching to a D-Link DGL-4300, marketed as a "gaming router." It was recommended by some people here; I've private messaged them to ensure that the reviews are solid, and their comments validate them. The router retails for $120. But, if you go to Outpost.com within this week, you can pick it up for $75 with free shipping. Not a bad deal. One of the forum members here whom I've messaged claimed to have worked for D-Link and said that the router should be capable of supporting 1000 concurrent connections. I think my Linksys chokes on ~200. The 4300 also supports gigabit on the wired side, if you can make use of it (I can't). I'll give a review of the router after I get it, although it'll take a few months to evaluate whether it's really solid or not. If you want to do hardcore network business, then your cheapest solution is probably to make a computer dedicated to routing.
__________________
Ledgem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 01:01   Link #14
toru310
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philippines
Ermm so what's the best wireless router that you can recommend???
toru310 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 01:29   Link #15
Ledgem
Love Yourself
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 28
There's no real "best" it seems. Linksys receives the less trashing overall; it seems like Netgear receives the most. Buffalo wireless routers have been praised pretty highly, but I don't know many who use them, so it's hard to say for certain. D-Link is mixed bag; I avoided them initially and went with Linksys for that reason, but with the 4300, it seems to be the "best."

But as I said, if you're not going to be performing strenuous network activity, something like the 4300 would be a waste of money. It's more money than I ever saw myself paying for a router, but my experiences so far indicate that you get what you pay for: I picked up the Airlink 101 for about $30 (and a few weeks later it dropped to $20), the Linksys for ~$40, and now the 4300 for $75 (would be $120 normally though). Again, I can't yet comment on the 4300's abilities.

Meanwhile, I did buy one of Linksys' mini-routers for my mother, and it seemed to work very nicely. She's not a techie person, but that thing hasn't been rebooted in over a year and she hasn't called me to say that the internet doesn't work. My father uses a WRT54g as well, if I remember right, and he hasn't complained about it, either. Then again, his WRT54g must be a v2 or v3. Both my parents aren't super-heavy net users; most of my father's heavy network usage (including VOIP) is routed through a Netgear switch rather than the Linksys router. But a switch is quite different from a router, and I won't go into that.

So, ultimately, it depends on what you plan to do. Big time BT user? Maybe you want to consider spending a bit more and getting the 4300 or something like it. Just a regular net user who doesn't mind resetting his router after a BT session every now and then? The lower-priced WRT54g is probably just fine for you. I just couldn't stand resetting my router every day; it was even worse because I rely on remoting in to my computer connected to the router. When the router would freeze up, I couldn't access my system. The reliability of my network is critical to me; I could just remove the router, but I appreciate the security layer it offers. And the fact that I can share my network with my girlfriend, and that way she won't be bored while I'm hacking away at homework. (Humor, laugh)

To summarize: consider what you use your network for and what you want out of the router. Consider your price range. Then, go out and read reviews.
__________________
Ledgem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 07:47   Link #16
toru310
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philippines
@ Ledgem: Wow..I guess wireless lynksis is the one to choose..to bad I always want to network my pc when I get the router but you say it freeze some times?
toru310 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 10:25   Link #17
Phantom-Takaya
INTJ
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Alaska
Age: 31
Send a message via AIM to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via MSN to Phantom-Takaya Send a message via Yahoo to Phantom-Takaya
Like we've all said, it all depends on how you use it. You can network with Linksys just fine as long as the mixture of other activities doesn't drag its performance down. Just have the router accessible for a reset just in case.

Of course, I haven't had any bad experience from my old Netgear router except for it was just its time to go. It handled the MTU packet size overbuffering a lot better than my current Linksys.
__________________
"Even in a crowd, I was always alone." - Ernest Hemmingway
"God asks no man whether he will accept life. That is not the choice. You must take it. The only choice is how." - Henry Ward Beecher
Friend: "Evidence that you guys are made of epic win." Me: "That wasn't my goal. My goal is chaos, fear and...eggs."
Phantom-Takaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-25, 20:11   Link #18
toru310
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Philippines
Well since Lynksis has all the security I need maybe lynksis is the way to go..and yeah maybe I'll expect resetting and stuff.
toru310 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-29, 02:59   Link #19
chris
[root@localhost]#
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Like i said in the other topic, and ill say it again here, If you are using bit torrent you will suffer if you use a router that can't support allot of connections. The only router i have seen that can support 1000 simultaneous connections so far is the D-link 4300 if someone wants to correct me on this then do so.
chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2007-04-29, 06:21   Link #20
KNETTER2000
Rei! What have you done!
 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: The Netherlands
Age: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migufuchi Fusutsu View Post
@ Ledgem: Wow..I guess wireless lynksis is the one to choose..to bad I always want to network my pc when I get the router but you say it freeze some times?
you could also consider an Asus WL500G Premium.

I'm not a fan of linksys. Once it was very good.. but now I rate it no higher than Sweex or trust ( if you know those brands) but for the low demanding user it should work.

I have this router and I'm extremely happy with it.

I have not had to reboot it , reset it or do anything to it after initial installment for the past 5 months I have it now, and that's with very heavy FTP/FXP/torrenting ( at this time my server in the attic is seeding like 13 torrents and I'm downloading 3 on the PC I'm typing this reply from.) After torrenting I can still reach my max download speed ( 2.4MB/s) I'm on a 20M/2M connection btw.

Firewall is configurable ( packet filtering) it has multiple settings for wireless.
Wireless reception form the router hasn't come lower than 60% signal in my house ( concrete, most with steel in it, 3 floors)

It has 2 USB connections on wich you can connect a multitude of hardware on ( USb flash stick, external harddrives, camera, speakers, printers etc)
It has a Torrent downloadmanager wich will enable you to download torrents even when your PC is off ( onto an external harddrive for instance), it can work as an FTP server , and as a multimedia server on the network or stick a webcam in it and view your room from work as security
this is all possible with the standard firmware.
it regularly happens that machines with lots of functionalities like that are unstable.. but I haven't noticed any instabilities yet..

And if you want to you can also get 3rd party firmware for it.. ( http://wl500g.info/ )
I have placed this router at 3 of my friends now who have the same demands as I have, and they too have had no complaints..

If you can get it where you live, at least consider it.
__________________
I believe in god as much as I believe in a world without porn...
Spoiler:
KNETTER2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:29.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.