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Old 2008-11-26, 13:26   Link #121
TinyRedLeaf
. . .
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 39
And, finally in case you think I'm quoting only from foreigners who are "out to get Japan", I leave you with words from one of your own countrymen:

The Nanjing Massacre
By Honda Katsuichi*, Penguin Books (2000)
Edited by Frank Gibney, translatd by Karen Sandness
Quote:
from pg 139:

The excerpts I have taken from the Library of War History from the National Defence Agency's National Defence College War History Office (published by Choun Shimbusa) make no mention of — just to name one example — campaigns where large quantities of poison gas were used, and they conceal facts unfavourable to the Japanese military as much as possible. The fundamental reason for these omissions is that Japan, unlike Germany and Italy, has not followed up on the war crimes committed by its own people.

The present-day Self Defence Force has thus inherited the crimes of the pre-war Japanese military without repenting them, so of course, it has not described its own (the old Japanese military's) criminal acts during the Nanjing Massacre.

By not acknowledging these crimes, we fail to grasp the complete picture of our own national character. Lacking this understanding, we keep appealing to the world, talking about Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the nuclear situation. We, therefore, gain a reputation for emphasising our role as victims without ever reflecting upon our own violent aspect.

This harms our credibility when we speak of peace, and we also give neighbouring countries every reason to be wary and to wonder whether we will repeat our war crimes.
*Born in 1932, Honda Katsuichi started as a reporter for Asahi in 1958 and continued working for that newspaper until his retirement in 1992. His first books were about mountaineering, exploration and the lives of primitive peoples, from northerhn Canada's Eskimos to the Bedouins of the Middle East to Japan's own aboriginals, the Ainu. In 1966, he made his first trip to Vietnam to cover the war there, and his books on Vietnam and later on Cambodia, sharply critical of the US military, centred on the plight of Vietnamese villagers in a war-ravaged country. He also chronicled the genocide of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge. Depredations of the US military in Vietnam led him to reflect on what Japan's soldiery had done in China. Honda Katsuichi is one of Japan's most prominent journalists.
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Old 2008-11-26, 19:22   Link #122
LeoXiao
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Oh, he's obviously a traitor in the pay of those dirty anti-Japanese elements

Quote:
This harms our credibility when we speak of peace, and we also give neighbouring countries every reason to be wary and to wonder whether we will repeat our war crimes.
Seriously speaking, I think this is probably the worst consequence of Japan's not apologizing.
But many countries have committed horrible crimes that need apologies. I wonder what would happen if everyone apologized all at once?
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Old 2008-11-26, 19:56   Link #123
Tri-ring
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Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
I did not say that Japan destroyed Korean culture but for most Koreans that is how they felt. As far as I know the name Kim existed for long time as the royalty of Silla dynasty was named Kim so I don't what you mean when you say its Chinese. And what do you mean by Korean having to adopt last name? It sounds like you are saying Koreans have no last name or something. I think what you mean is that Japanese trying to change Korean name into Japanese. Also can you back what you said about Japan reintroducing Hangul? Because from what I know Japan suppressed Hangul and tried to assimilate the Koreans to become more Japanese.
Commoners usually did not have family names until modernization around the world.
For example Leonardo da Vinci meant Leonardo from Vinci village.
In Japan, family names adopted by commoner occured after the Meji restoration.
As for Hangul being surpressed by Japan is as misconception since there were daily newspaper published in Hangul and text books used at school still exists.
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Old 2008-11-26, 21:01   Link #124
Terrestrial Dream
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
Commoners usually did not have family names until modernization around the world.
For example Leonardo da Vinci meant Leonardo from Vinci village.
In Japan, family names adopted by commoner occured after the Meji restoration.
As for Hangul being surpressed by Japan is as misconception since there were daily newspaper published in Hangul and text books used at school still exists.
hmm... interesting but Korean inventor around 1400 name Jang Young sil who was a commoner and yet he does have last name. And I did find out bit on newspaper being published in Hangul, it seems that it was done by a man name Inoue Kakugorou(found out in wiki discussion) and it seemed that Hangul was banned in 1941. Anyhow I should do more research on this.
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Old 2008-11-26, 22:58   Link #125
Shadow Kira01
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Originally Posted by LeoXiao View Post
Oh, he's obviously a traitor in the pay of those dirty anti-Japanese elements
Katsuki Honda is no traitor. He was a former reporter and a reporter is for honest journalism. There is nothing wrong with his book; it is a work of academics.
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Old 2008-11-26, 23:48   Link #126
LeoXiao
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my deepest apologies, t'was but a joke
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Old 2008-11-27, 00:10   Link #127
Tri-ring
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Originally Posted by Terrestrial Dream View Post
hmm... interesting but Korean inventor around 1400 name Jang Young sil who was a commoner and yet he does have last name. And I did find out bit on newspaper being published in Hangul, it seems that it was done by a man name Inoue Kakugorou(found out in wiki discussion) and it seemed that Hangul was banned in 1941. Anyhow I should do more research on this.
I don't know that much about medival Korean history but in Japan commoner usually were granted the right to take up a family name by the ruling lord when he provides distinguished service and/or account to the kingdom.
In Japan, some wealth village leaders falls into this catagory and were allowed family names. Names like Yoshida and/or Suzuki are some names that were probably adopted by these village leaders since it means good rice patty and tree with bell size fruit.

I think in a way it is the same as in Europe where commoner took family names from the trade they were in like Shoemaker, Smith and/or Gardner.
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Old 2008-12-05, 08:51   Link #128
TinyRedLeaf
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More than a week, and still no answer from Japan regarding my allegedly "biased" view of events in WWII. Hmph. The silence, as usual, is deafening.

No matter. I take it that the dispute is settled, and that everyone would much prefer to see the way forward, rather than the wreckage of the past.

It would be a pity indeed to leave this thread hanging in bad blood. In reality, inter-country relations in East Asia — and the rest of the Asian Pacific-Rim — are fraught with complex nuances. Yes, grievances remain, festering just beneath the surface, and often fanned by opportunistic politicians. But much more optimistically, each new generation of East Asians brings fresh solutions to the region's problems. We only need only look past the petty political squabbling to see that most East Asians today are more comfortable with each other than 60 years ago.

And, truth be told, I see a lot of promise in today's Japan, as a model for East Asian economic, technological and social development. Japan, after all, is the only truly modernised country in East Asia. It is the only East Asian country so far to have successfully turned itself into a high-tech nation without losing its unique cultural identity (South Korea comes close, but if we take the Korean peninsular, and the Korean nation as a whole, it still has a long way to go.)

There is much that is good that can be learned from Japan today: its highly innovative technology and creative industries; its commitment to ecological and environmental protection; its ability to maintain social harmony amid great demographic change.

This article, recently published by Time magazine, sums it all far better than I can. It's a good read that gives much food for thought.

Quote:
Japan Reaches Out
By Hannah Beech, Tokyo
Nov 20, 2008


When Kensuke Onishi decided to use his foreign university degree and fluent English to help internally displaced refugees in Kurdish Iraq, his Japanese mother's friends told her they understood if she wanted to weep.

After all, shouldn't a dutiful Japanese son return home and work for a big company, like the droves of salarymen before him? But in 1996, Onishi founded one of Japan's largest international NGOs, Peace Winds Japan, which operates everywhere from Sudan to East Timor.

Today, the 41-year-old Osaka native has noticed that his countrymen no longer consider helping less fortunate foreigners a shameful occupation. Two former Peace Winds alumni now serve in the Diet, while Onishi recently has been fielding job queries from disillusioned investment bankers.

"People in Japan live in such comfortable, peaceful conditions," says Onishi. "I think more Japanese are realising that it's our duty to help out overseas and bring some of our values to the world."

Foreigners love Japan
Is the world turning Japanese? Even as Japan's domestic economy slips into recession and its politicians dither endlessly, the country's overseas influence is reaching new heights. Limited by a postwar constitution from developing military power, Japan's international clout relies on soft power.

Today, a generation of idealistic Japanese is attempting to sway the world through cultural, social and economic means. According to a BBC poll this year, Japan ranks second in the world when it comes to a positive global image. (Germany barely edged out Japan for the No. 1 spot, while the United States was seventh.)

Until recently, the idea of Japanese values conjured up little more than a picture of workaholic company drones. But throughout the world — even in places where Japanese colonialists once unleashed brutal wartime campaigns — the world's second largest economy has suddenly been thrust into the unfamiliar position of exemplar.

Developing countries such as Vietnam are studying how Japan refashioned its war-ravaged economy into a technological powerhouse that still maintains its cultural identity. Industrialising nations are looking for ecological guidance from a place that has managed to become an economic giant while still embracing a conservationist ethos. Still others gravitate toward Japan because of its trendy comic books and, not least, for its generous checkbook. Even though Japan has in recent years scaled back its foreign-aid commitments, the nation is still the top bilateral donor to many developing countries, including Cambodia and Nepal.

Japan is benefiting because of what it isn't. The world's renewed love affair with the nation has blossomed just as many nations are growing wary of the rising influence of Asia's other superpower: China. Unlike Japan, China has done little to mask its global natural-resources grab. "There's a strong perception that China's not doing enough for people's rights," says Yasushi Watanabe, co-editor of a new book called Soft Power Superpowers. "Japan is more naturally accepted as a member of the international community."

Giving something back
A sizable contingent of Japanese, who grew up in the era of globalisation, see it as their homeland's responsibility to engage with — and help — the rest of the world. Peace Winds founder Onishi is just one of a growing group of Japanese who have founded their own international NGOs.

Instead of being automatically vacuumed up by domestic firms, many top university graduates are eager to work abroad. The number of Japanese who studied at foreign universities tripled from 1990 to 2004, to 82,925 students.

Those back home are eager to learn about the world, too. Onishi recalls how he signed on as a guest lecturer at two top Tokyo universities and wondered whether anyone would show up to hear about remote corners of the earth. Both courses ended up being oversubscribed, with some eager students forced to stand through the lectures.

Such idealism drives recruits for the government-run Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers, which since 1965 has dispatched more than 30,000 people to do good in 70-plus countries.

Another telling barometer is the number of Japanese specialist personnel working for the United Nations, which has increased to nearly 700 today from less than 500 seven years ago. "Among the Japanese public," says co-editor Watanabe, "there's a sense that since we were helped by other countries to rebuild 60 years ago, it's a noble thing for us to do the same now."

Today, the bulk of volunteers are women or older Japanese who are searching for meaning in their post-retirement lives. Most contribute in fields that seem typically Japanese: planting stronger strains of rice, running environmental-training programs, teaching high school math and science.

Chiyoko Ichishima, 33, helps female villagers near the Ugandan capital of Kampala build a local craft trade. "When Ugandans think of Japan, they immediately think of cars and other high-tech stuff," she says. "But as a Japanese, it's nice to be here and help promote Ugandan culture."

Kitty's example
Yet as much as Japan is exerting its influence abroad, the country needs to welcome the world to its shores, too. In the same way, unless Japan relaxes its rigid immigration policies, cultivating foreign Japanophiles will be a waste of time.

Indeed, in moving beyond Japan's insular past, Prime Minister Aso might do well to take inspiration from a cuddly cat. Hello Kitty, it turns out, may not be ethnically Japanese. Her surname is not Suzuki or Sato but White. Her parents are named George and Mary. Yet the mouthless feline has prospered as one of Japan's most successful exports, a fitting symbol of an open Japan. Arigato Kitty, hello world.


Read full version here.
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Old 2008-12-05, 09:17   Link #129
Tri-ring
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No I just thought it was no use arguing since you are fixated in prosecuting Japan not being able to accept that the then Chinese immigrants were part of the cycle, subjugating the indigenous not being able acknowledge that what goes around comes around.
If you acknowledge the latter part then I do not think the former part could be strongly pursued.
Saying one does not have anything with the other or trying to deny the fact by presenting other miscellaneous reasoning really doesn't help.
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Old 2008-12-05, 13:34   Link #130
Lathdrinor
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"What goes around comes around. "

So it's fine to massacre civilians - men, women, and children - because they might have played a part in subjugating another people, correct?

*rubs chin*

So by that notion, the US atomic bombing of Japan was entirely justified, right?

What goes around comes around, indeed.

Btw, I wouldn't be so sure that the massacres Japan carried out on Chinese populations in Malaysia, etc. were based on "freeing" the local peoples. More likely, they were reprisals against Chinese resistance groups. In Malaysia, the Malaysian Communist Party (which formed the backbone of the resistance and was mostly comprised of Chinese) opposed both the British and the Japanese (they called for an end to British imperialism, for example), but became particularly anti-Japanese due to Japan's racial policies.

On the other hand, you have presented little evidence regarding Chinese "subjugation" of the indigenous peoples outside of the fact that they once cooperated with the British (but all the elites, including the indigenous ones, did) and that they were against Japan. Given that Japan, at the time, called itself the Empire of Japan, arguing that Japan was anti-imperialist is a little ludicrous, don't you think? Just admit it. Japan fanned racial resentment within Malaysia in order to cement its control of the region. It targeted the Chinese population because China was at war with Japan and Japan did not intend to take any chances from Chinese resistance groups.

The truth will always come out in the end.

Last edited by Lathdrinor; 2008-12-05 at 14:06.
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Old 2008-12-05, 15:04   Link #131
Claies
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As far as national guilt is concerned, while Japan is at least subconsciously avoiding that they performed the Nanjing massacre, the United States isn't faring too much better. Dresden and My Lai aren't particularly burned into American minds, and the common American people outwardly express no problems with attacking (and in extension nuking) their opposition. You need only look at all the rhetoric when the Afghan and Iraqi campaigns started.

The problems of East Asia getting along = Christian and Muslim countries getting along = USA(+West Europe) and Russia getting along, etc. These rivalries have been burning far, far before the 20th Century, and extend beyond current socioeconomic concerns and deep into social stigma. History doesn't bode well in helping them get along when the hate has been subconsciously passed down for centuries.

I admit one anomaly: the British and the French seem to be quite alright with each other at the moment, mostly because of Germany and Russia. I conjecture that the only way to promote a region-wide East Asian alliance is to have a massive outside force threaten them as a whole. Considering that they're politically spread out (assume socialism vs. capitalism), you're going to need a third party that is really huge. For Europe this was called Nazi Germany (and then USSR), and I don't see that happening anywhere now for East Asia.

tl;dr: Just admit that everyone hates each other, and the only variable is how loud they are about it.
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Old 2008-12-05, 15:14   Link #132
Lathdrinor
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Well, Christians and Muslims have hated each other for centuries, if not millenia.

Hatred between East Asian countries is much more recent. S. Korea, for example, did not really hate China until the PRC came along, and was a close ally of China for most of the Ming Dynasty. While Japan rarely got along with any of its neighbors, hate is really too strong of a word for its historical relationships with China and Korea - politically, Old Japan largely kept to itself and vice versa; at times, they were also trade partners.

So no, I don't think "everyone hates each other." As you yourself pointed out, European countries are much more friendly towards each other today than they were a century or two ago. Things can and do change.
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Old 2008-12-05, 15:27   Link #133
Claies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lathdrinor View Post
Well, Christians and Muslims have hated each other for centuries, if not millenia.

Hatred between East Asian countries is much more recent. S. Korea, for example, did not really hate China until the PRC came along, and was a close ally of China for most of the Ming Dynasty. While Japan never got along with any of its neighbors, hate is really too strong of a word for its historical relationships with China and Korea - Old Japan largely kept to itself and vice versa.

So no, I don't think "everyone hates each other." As you yourself pointed out, European countries are much more friendly towards each other today than they were a century or two ago. Things can and do change.
In retrospect, I agree that Japan hasn't really gone crazy until their modernization (whereupon they fought a whopping four wars in half a century). The fact stands, though, that historically they do not get along with China and Korea. I *think* we can map this to British-French relations.

I agree that things can and do change, but I believe the historical formulas (conquest or union against one enemy) for change are highly unlikely to appear today for East Asia. Seeing that neither Britain nor France held a solid conquest over the other as it's kind of burned in as national pride that conquest of any type wouldn't work towards getting along, I find the "one enemy" scenario more likely, and even that's not saying much for East Asia. A very large and influential country/group has to say "screw you all" to all of East Asia for this to happen.

Let's say the earliest possible upcoming major change is Kim Jong-Il's death and twiddle fingers around that. I think the Korean peninsula would take about half a century to stabilize if they were to unify.
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Old 2008-12-05, 16:35   Link #134
Shadow Kira01
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Originally Posted by Lathdrinor View Post
Well, Christians and Muslims have hated each other for centuries, if not millenia.
True. Religion rivalries had occurred since it ever existed. It can't be helped. I know the reasons too, but that would be off-topic.

Quote:
Hatred between East Asian countries is much more recent. S. Korea, for example, did not really hate China until the PRC came along, and was a close ally of China for most of the Ming Dynasty. While Japan rarely got along with any of its neighbors, hate is really too strong of a word for its historical relationships with China and Korea - politically, Old Japan largely kept to itself and vice versa; at times, they were also trade partners.
Before PRC came along, China had invaded Japan with the help of Korea twice in the 13th century, which can be considered as forgotten reasons of the hatred between East Asian nations.

Between 1274 and 1281, the Mongolian Empire of China under the leadership of Kublai Khan (founded of Yuan Dynasty) invaded Japan. Although the Mongol Empire of China at the time lacked naval capabilities, they came up with an effective plan. The daughter of Kublai Khan was married to the Korean prince as a political marriage to enable the support of Korea to build ships to attack Japan. After the founding of the Yuan Dynasty in 1271, the Yuan Dynasty dispatched naval units to invade Japan 2 years later utilizing 15000 Mongols and Chinese soldiers, as well as 8000 Korean warriors. It was known as the "Battle of Hakata Bay".

After failing the invasion, the Yuan Dynasty attempted a second time with the Goryeo Dynasty of Korea under the leadership of King Gongmin again to invade Japan which was collectively known as the "Battle of Koan". The second time was a failure too.

Quote:
So no, I don't think "everyone hates each other." As you yourself pointed out, European countries are much more friendly towards each other today than they were a century or two ago. Things can and do change.
European countries are more friendly to each other, because Europe is united under one currency and also alliance, known as the "European Union". Their currency is Euro, instead of the latter various types. More over, the culture and educational differences between Asia and Europe is too evident in this day and age. While people in North America and Europe discuss about sports, games, and entertainment everyday, most people in Asia are busy with politics and military-related issues. However, considering how Europe can manage it, I don't see why any one continent cannot, its up to the people itself.. Unfortunately, I don't see it happening though.
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Old 2008-12-05, 19:01   Link #135
Tri-ring
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lathdrinor View Post
Btw, I wouldn't be so sure that the massacres Japan carried out on Chinese populations in Malaysia, etc. were based on "freeing" the local peoples. More likely, they were reprisals against Chinese resistance groups. In Malaysia, the Malaysian Communist Party (which formed the backbone of the resistance and was mostly comprised of Chinese) opposed both the British and the Japanese (they called for an end to British imperialism, for example), but became particularly anti-Japanese due to Japan's racial policies.
From the beginning I never said Japan went to South East Asia to free the indigenous people, I always stated that the Chinese immigrants who were cooperating with the European colonist became a resisting force therefore Japan used brutal force to compete against the resistance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lathdrinor View Post
On the other hand, you have presented little evidence regarding Chinese "subjugation" of the indigenous peoples outside of the fact that they once cooperated with the British (but all the elites, including the indigenous ones, did) and that they were against Japan. Given that Japan, at the time, called itself the Empire of Japan, arguing that Japan was anti-imperialist is a little ludicrous, don't you think? Just admit it. Japan fanned racial resentment within Malaysia in order to cement its control of the region. It targeted the Chinese population because China was at war with Japan and Japan did not intend to take any chances from Chinese resistance groups.

The truth will always come out in the end.
Yeah yeah, you people were all a happy group of people with no racial discrimination.
Japan fanned racial resentment?
What are you smoking?

Talk about pot calling the kettle black.
At least I admit that the Japanese troops used brutal force to a certain group which were fighting against Japan's occupation, how about you?
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Old 2008-12-05, 19:55   Link #136
Nerroth
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Originally Posted by ShimatheKat View Post
Germany has no reason to do so - it's weak to the point that Germans would usually rather do civil service than join the army. Besides, 26 other EU members are there to stop Germany. If anyone would start a war there, it'd be either Russia or France actually.

I just went through some of the posts in this thread after my last attempt to contribute - not that it made much of a difference, I guess - but I had to bring this point up.


Germany, unlike Japan, is a part of NATO, and not only were both Germanies heavily-armed (what with being on the front lines of the NATO-Warsaw Pact divide) but the Bundeswehr is still one of the largest and most capable armed forces in Europe.

(Indeed, post-1990, the Bundeswehr has been increasingly involved in UN-mandated roles around the world - from Afghanistan to the coast of Lebanon and beyond.)



But far more importantly, the very idea that people in Europe would have any reason to be afraid of modern-day Germany in any military sense is, quite frankly, laughable.

Rather, considering that the country's coffers have, and continue to be, the chief sources of revenue for the various European institutions - which manifests in all kinds of infrastructure payments and projects across the Union - the main thing that the likes of the former Eastern Bloc members would be upset about is that we in Ireland got a much sweeter deal when we joined the Union compared to what was on offer for them!

(I remember one of my old lecturers telling me of a time when a Russian visitor was in a car with him, as they drove around some of the new roads circling Dublin. When she asked where the money came from, he said that the Germans paid for it - to which she joked "The Germans paid for this? We should have let them win!" Gotta love that Russian sense of humour...)


The Union has been at the very heart of modern Europe's development - but Japan can't hope to take part in something similar (even if they wanted to) without the kind of changes that were a struggle to get right in Western Europe, and can only go so far as long as the likes of the PRC and DPRK have governments which, let's say, would not sign the likes of the acquis communitaire which allows European states to share the kind of common institutions and policies that they do.



Oh, by the way, in case anyone is interested in looking at the European example, the book Postwar by Tony Judt is highly recommended.
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Old 2008-12-05, 21:18   Link #137
Lathdrinor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
Yeah yeah, you people were all a happy group of people with no racial discrimination.
Japan fanned racial resentment?
What are you smoking?

Talk about pot calling the kettle black.
At least I admit that the Japanese troops used brutal force to a certain group which were fighting against Japan's occupation, how about you?
If your point is that racial resentment & discrimination existed before the Japanese came, I don't disagree. I never said that Malaysia was a paradise, or that the people there were saints.

But if your point is that Japan's racial policies didn't increase racial resentment, I must ask: where are your sources? The sources I've looked at recognize the fact that Japan's occupation and targeting of Chinese civilians polarized the politics of the region, contributing to the ethnic strife and violence that followed decolonization. Richard Clutterbuck, in Conflict and Violence in Singapore and Malaysia, notes: "the relations between Chinese and Malays, which had been good before the war, were ruined" during World War II. (For more reading, see In-won Hwang's Personalized Politics: The Malaysian State Under Mahathir.)

Why did this occur? For one thing, realize that a number of Malay officials collaborated with the Japanese military against Chinese Malaysians. This increased the resentment between the Chinese and Malay elites, leading to MPAJA retaliation (against these officials) after the war. This, in turn, contributed to a bloody chapter of interracial conflict in Malaysia that eventually led to:

1. The secession of Singapore

2. Race riots & pogroms

Mind you, I'm not blaming all of it on Japan, but saying that Japanese occupation (which was much more brutal than British occupation at time) didn't fuel existing racial tensions ignores both history & human psychology.

Again, where are your sources?

Last edited by Lathdrinor; 2008-12-05 at 22:44.
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Old 2008-12-05, 23:02   Link #138
Lathdrinor
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Quote:
The Union has been at the very heart of modern Europe's development - but Japan can't hope to take part in something similar (even if they wanted to) without the kind of changes that were a struggle to get right in Western Europe, and can only go so far as long as the likes of the PRC and DPRK have governments which, let's say, would not sign the likes of the acquis communitaire which allows European states to share the kind of common institutions and policies that they do.
Let's put it this way, even the ROK hasn't established such a relationship with Japan and they have plenty of common interests.

Hell, there are still unresolved territorial disputes in East Asia.
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Old 2008-12-05, 23:04   Link #139
Shadow Kira01
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Has anybody realized that the resentment between Malaysians and the Chinese are not exclusive to the incidents of the East Asian conflict, but a result of religious differences. China has been considering the Muslim population as their enemies. It is a fact that the majority of Malaysians are Muslims and doesn't this make a valid reason for them to hate each other?
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Old 2008-12-05, 23:13   Link #140
Lathdrinor
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Originally Posted by Shadow Minato View Post
Has anybody realized that the resentment between Malaysians and the Chinese are not exclusive to the incidents of the East Asian conflict, but a result of religious differences. China has been considering the Muslim population as their enemies. It is a fact that the majority of Malaysians are Muslims and doesn't this make a valid reason for them to hate each other?
The resentment between modern day Southeast Asians and Southeast Asian-Chinese have more to do with the race riots and pogroms in the 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s, discriminatory national policies, unequal wealth distribution, and different cultures (yes, the fact that Southeast Asians tend to be Muslims plays an important role), than they have to do with what the Japanese did. However, that Japanese actions in Malaysia fueled racial tensions is accepted and documented.

History must not be denied.
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