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Old 2010-05-02, 11:51   Link #41
TheFluff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alamarco View Post
@TheFluff: Just because hackers can get around DRM doesn't mean you should remove it. Look at real-life security systems. Do you think banks said that about security systems? It used to be a lot easier to rob a bank, but they didn't just give up and remove security. The banks just didn't open up shop and let all the thieves in. They slowly improved their systems to make it harder and harder. Nothing is foolproof, but you can make things more difficult and make the consequences of getting caught rough.

DRM is just like that. They will slowly improve it as they learn more about it, more about the hackers, etc.
I see you didn't read the article I linked. DRM is impossible to make anywhere near secure for obvious cryptographical reasons; more specifically you have to provide the attacker (who is also your legitimate customer) with all the tools necessary to break the encryption. It has never worked so far and will continue never work until we live in a 1984-like society where companies and/or the state controls what we can do with our computers. There is literally no reason whatsoever to keep it, the only reason it's still there is because media company execs are retarded about technology and don't understand that the only thing it does is make people like piracy because it doesn't have any silly restrictions. Just look at iTunes Store, which is one of the biggest sellers of digital music out there and completely DRM-free now.

Your argument is also dumb for other reasons that I can't even be bothered to write a tl;dr about, so just go read the damn article already.
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Old 2010-05-02, 20:53   Link #42
alamarco
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@Lord of Fire: Of course not all countries have the same laws. One thing I want to ask though, are those CD's imports or local music? If they are imports one has to keep in mind that the way the CD's would made are in accordance to where they came from. If they aren't imports, than that would be something wrong with the music labels and the laws governing the country.

@TheFluff: Who said I did not read the article? Must I respond to each point individually? I'll respond to this topic and to the arguments presented, not to an article. Like I said, you would not say the same thing about bank security system. The banks did not have perfect systems at the beginning, and neither does DRM. NOTHING is perfect at the start. If we relied on things being perfect at the beginning of conception we would still be cavemen. DRM is not even close to perfection right now and it's far too early to just give up.

My argument is valid. Security systems are needed, but they are not perfect. It takes time to learn and adapt for security systems to become better.
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Old 2010-05-02, 22:03   Link #43
Vexx
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Seems to me DRM is getting worse at its mission over the last five years ... not better. Its interfering more often with legitimate customers and less often with crackers.

The analogy with the banking system has some fundamental conceptual flaws. I can only suggest reading some of Bruce Schneier's work on the technicalities of why DRM is just "security theater" and it is the latest version of the "perpetual motion" con job on industry bosses.
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Old 2010-05-03, 02:46   Link #44
Daiz
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Quote:
@TheFluff: Who said I did not read the article? Must I respond to each point individually? I'll respond to this topic and to the arguments presented, not to an article. Like I said, you would not say the same thing about bank security system. The banks did not have perfect systems at the beginning, and neither does DRM. NOTHING is perfect at the start. If we relied on things being perfect at the beginning of conception we would still be cavemen. DRM is not even close to perfection right now and it's far too early to just give up.

My argument is valid. Security systems are needed, but they are not perfect. It takes time to learn and adapt for security systems to become better.
You completely ignored the point he made. Bank security is supposed to prevent anyone from getting in. DRM always needs to give the perpetrator (who is also the legit customer) the keys to the vault, otherwise the customer wouldn't be able to enjoy the content he/she just bought. This is also why DRM will never succeed in securing content. It's also a good thing to remember that if it can be seen/heard, it can always be recorded. DRM is a flawed solution that will only make the illegal alternative look more attractive. The music industry already noticed this, which is why pretty much no store sells DRM'd music anymore.

EDIT: I'd say the only place where DRM could be effective is games since you can't really re-record interactive entertainment. Reality has shown that this doesn't work, though: Ubisoft's latest and greatest DRM scheme has already been cracked and pirates can enjoy their products offline. Meanwhile, legit customers are at the whim of Ubisoft's authentication server uptimes, which aren't that great. And every time they go down, legit customers can't play, and pirates can. Go DRM!
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Old 2010-05-03, 04:09   Link #45
Lord of Fire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alamarco View Post
@Lord of Fire: Of course not all countries have the same laws. One thing I want to ask though, are those CD's imports or local music? If they are imports one has to keep in mind that the way the CD's would made are in accordance to where they came from. If they aren't imports, than that would be something wrong with the music labels and the laws governing the country.
Why does that matter? If I buy a CD, it should be mine to do with it whatever I like, be it copying, lending it to a friend or even selling it (because that too is illegal if you take copyright laws literally). Copyright laws and DRM prevent me from using a CD I legally bought the way I want to. That should be illegal, not the ones circumventing this 'security system' to get to the contents they are legally entitled to.

Also, you can expand this to DVD and Blu-Ray as well, except that you have an additional annoyance to deal with: region coding.
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Old 2010-05-03, 05:30   Link #46
TheFluff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alamarco View Post
@TheFluff: Who said I did not read the article? Must I respond to each point individually? I'll respond to this topic and to the arguments presented, not to an article. Like I said, you would not say the same thing about bank security system. The banks did not have perfect systems at the beginning, and neither does DRM. NOTHING is perfect at the start. If we relied on things being perfect at the beginning of conception we would still be cavemen. DRM is not even close to perfection right now and it's far too early to just give up.

My argument is valid. Security systems are needed, but they are not perfect. It takes time to learn and adapt for security systems to become better.
No, it's not valid, and we've already told you why. The bank analogy is terrible and you should just drop it already. Either you haven't grasped the fundamental reason as to why DRM is a failed idea to begin with, or you're just being obstinate for some reason.

Let me try again: it is perfectly possible to make normal communications (such as bank transfers etc) very secure (but not perfectly secure, even if it currently seems extremely unlikely that someone will manage to crack the currently used encryption schemes). There are attacks against such security systems, but they all rely on bugs in the implementation, social engineering or identity spoofing rather than attacks against the actual encryption system itself.

However, it is not possible to make DRM secure. At all. It is inherently insecure, and all attempts to make it secure are basically just adding security through obscurity. I and several others have already told you why; it's not a controversial or disputed standpoint, it is a basic cryptographic fact. As long as anyone cares about cracking a DRM system, it will always be cracked, no matter how complicated it is. It's just a matter of time.

For example, let's take a look at the standard SSL/TLS encryption used for pretty much all online purchases. The standard is public, it is well understood, there are multiple implementations of it, the encryption isn't particularly strong and there is a huge incentive for anyone who manages to crack it (they'd be able to basically break the internet). Yet, there are basically no known attacks against it, only against some buggy implementations.
On the other hand, take a look at something like StarForce. A hugely complicated and elaborate scheme with virtual machines, virtual file systems, strong encryption, special operating system drivers running in the background, lots of obfuscation everywhere. Some call it malware because it's very hard to get rid of and can damage your computer's performance. And yet every single game protected by it has been cracked. Same thing with AACS, which has things like certificate revocation, a whole array of keys on different levels that get changed on a regular basis, etc etc; much more advanced than SSL. It still got cracked. Even the still more complicated BD+ encryption that allows the BluRay player execute code in a virtual machine in order to detect tampering and such also got cracked.

It's not that DRM "isn't perfect yet". It's the simple fact that it is trying to accomplish something that it is inherently impossible. Trying harder isn't going to make the situation any better; the most it can accomplish is being even more annoying for legitimate customers.
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17:43:13 <~deculture> Also, TheFluff, you are so fucking slowpoke.jpg that people think we dropped the DVD's.
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Old 2010-05-03, 08:45   Link #47
cyth
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... But you are saying that people have less incentive to crack a bank's SSL encryption than to break a game's DRM scheme. Obviously the former works and the latter doesn't. So if it's not the technology behind the implementations at fault, it has to be something else. There's room for improvement in that area then.

Security devices are needed simply because when you let the product out of your vault, you devalue it, pure and simple. Just look at the recent Gizmodo iPhone mess; what if some Chinese bootlegger got to the device first? The reason why publishers put prices on their products at all is because they have control over its production quantity and distribution. It's really easy to point to iTunes as a working non-DRM business, but when you think about it, how much profit do they plan on making with those single song downloads? Music is just part of anime or game productions, think about that for a second, let it sink in. We have three vastly different products on our hands and you want the publishers to treat them equally. Are you retarded or something?
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Old 2010-05-03, 11:19   Link #48
TheFluff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
... But you are saying that people have less incentive to crack a bank's SSL encryption than to break a game's DRM scheme.
wait, what
when did I say that
of course the incentive to crack SSL is enormously bigger than the one of cracking some shitty DRM scheme, how could it possibly be the reverse?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Obviously the former works and the latter doesn't. So if it's not the technology behind the implementations at fault, it has to be something else. There's room for improvement in that area then.
What are you even talking about, what area? Of course it's the technology that's at fault; any DRM scheme is an inherently flawed technology. No matter how advanced it is, it can't accomplish the impossible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Security devices are needed simply because when you let the product out of your vault, you devalue it, pure and simple.
In this case you actually add value. Interoperability is a good thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Just look at the recent Gizmodo iPhone mess; what if some Chinese bootlegger got to the device first?
What if, indeed? What does this have to do with DRM?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
The reason why publishers put prices on their products at all is because they have control over its production quantity and distribution.
You actually sorta hit a nail on a head here, but I'm not sure you've understood what you're saying or its implications. What you describe is called artificial scarcity, and is the basis of the industry's current business models. However, the problem with those business models is that they DON'T have control over the production quantity and distribution anymore, and I don't see any way it's getting back to them anytime soon, so I guess they'll just have to cope with it and adjust their business models.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
It's really easy to point to iTunes as a working non-DRM business, but when you think about it, how much profit do they plan on making with those single song downloads?
I dunno, but probably a lot! I mean they've sold over 10 billion songs at a price of like $1 each, so yeah! They basically don't have any significant expenses except licensing agreements either (bandwidth and storage is insignificant in relation).

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Music is just part of anime or game productions, think about that for a second, let it sink in. We have three vastly different products on our hands and you want the publishers to treat them equally. Are you retarded or something?
i lost you again
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17:43:13 <~deculture> Also, TheFluff, you are so fucking slowpoke.jpg that people think we dropped the DVD's.
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Old 2010-05-03, 11:41   Link #49
karice67
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@ cyth and alamarco
There's another point you should consider.

If you want to insist on the bank analogy, another major difference between breaking DRM and bank security would be that:
  • Breaking a bank's SSL encryption would give the cracker access to a limited amount of information, which he/she would then try to sell. Once compromised, the bank can take steps to limit the damage. Thus damage is somewhat restricted.
  • In contrast, breaking the DRM for a media product liberates it for mass distribution, which would usually be the aim of the cracker in the first place. Once cracked by even one person, nothing can be done to retrieve the distributed content, or even to restrict further distribution. As Cory Doctorow's example (quoted by TheFluff on page 2) notes, the main people DRM inconveniences are legitimate buyers who wish to make copies for their own, legitimate purposes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Security devices are needed simply because when you let the product out of your vault, you devalue it, pure and simple. Just look at the recent Gizmodo iPhone mess; what if some Chinese bootlegger got to the device first?
...
It's really easy to point to iTunes as a working non-DRM business, but when you think about it, how much profit do they plan on making with those single song downloads? Music is just part of anime or game productions, think about that for a second, let it sink in. We have three vastly different products on our hands and you want the publishers to treat them equally. Are you retarded or something?
Gadgets like the iPhone are vastly different from media like anime, music and games. Such gadgets are tools, through which content (anime, music, games, movies etc) are accessed. Anime and games are really a lot more similar to music than tools like the iPhone are...i.e. you've negated your argument yourself with the underlined statement.

And your last rhetorical question really wasn't necessary.
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Old 2010-05-03, 11:53   Link #50
seven|x_x
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
... But you are saying that people have less incentive to crack a bank's SSL encryption than to break a game's DRM scheme. Obviously the former works and the latter doesn't.
there is more incentive against trying to break a banks encryption than a games. im gonna go out on a limb and say that most of the guys out there cracking could have a go at a bank, but they'd rather not mess up and spend 50+ years in prison.

back on topic: drm is just rights management. i dont think they(the drm designers) actually expect it to stop everyone, just stop enough of them(piracy ignorant end users) to be able to pull a (in)decent profit.

i have to agree with diaz on the point of games being the only medium that could possibly be drm'd with any effectiveness(not that i see it happening). with movies, music, even ebooks, there are a multitude of ways to just capture the decrypted stream as its sent to the authorized end user. it becomes pointless to try to stop pirates, the point becomes roping in the unintelligent masses early enough that they dont think they need to pirate.
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Old 2010-05-03, 12:58   Link #51
cyth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seven|x_x View Post
there is more incentive against trying to break a banks encryption than a games. im gonna go out on a limb and say that most of the guys out there cracking could have a go at a bank, but they'd rather not mess up and spend 50+ years in prison.
Exactly. If what TheFluff says about the technology used in encryption is true, that it's not some incomprehensible voodoo magic, then obviously the banks are doing something right, despite huge incentives to break encryption schemes, and content publishers are doing something wrong. Maybe publishers are simply not scary enough, the state doesn't have strict enough laws, the police is useless in dealing with petty crime etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFluff
Interoperability is a good thing.
Its implications are actually a bad thing for the stability of a marketplace as a whole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFluff
You actually sorta hit a nail on a head here, but I'm not sure you've understood what you're saying or its implications. What you describe is called artificial scarcity, and is the basis of the industry's current business models.
Sorry, but normal market forces influence products handicapped by artificial scarcity as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by seven|x_x View Post
Anime and games are really a lot more similar to music than tools like the iPhone are...i.e. you've negated your argument yourself with the underlined statement.
They are more similar, but I wasn't using the iPhone in this argument anyway. However, they are not the same product and shouldn't be treated equally anyway. Fortunately for Apple, they pulled the right strings at the right time for them to be able to profit from gadgets and content at the same time, but I believe they make bigger margins from selling gadgets rather than content. Game console market loses money on gadgets and profits on games, so of course it's in Sony's best interest to protect their games as aggressively as they have ever since PS3 came out.

No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past, but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
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Old 2010-05-03, 13:30   Link #52
seven|x_x
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Game console market loses money on gadgets and profits on games, so of course it's in Sony's best interest to protect their games as aggressively as they have ever since PS3 came out.
i think that specific example has more to do with the lack of custom firmware for the PS3, and the fact that most people dont have the resources(be it bandwidth or hdd space) to torrent 35GB games. the size or the rip itself means that most people would rather just go out and rent the game, as opposed to a 360, where most people can download 8GB or so overnight, then burn a dvd. if all you needed to play burnt games on a ps3 was a flashed bluray drive, people would still need to buy bluray burners and blank blurays; and at that point its easier to just buy the games... so for ps3 custom firmware is the only reason able option for pirating games.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past, but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
i dont think its bullshit coming from pirates, i thinks its bullshit forced upon the end user, which turns people into pirates.

also: i didnt say anything about the iphone, that quote should go to someone else.
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Old 2010-05-03, 13:41   Link #53
Vexx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post

No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past, but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
Actually, it comes from the most respected voices in computational and network security, as well as some of the biggest users of legitimate software. So *who* all "knows it"? DRM is a recent tactic (less than 20 years old) ... and a lot of the motivational drivers are vendors of DRM packages who advert by scaring clueless executives of content distribution companies. Many of these execs also suffer from the mythology of "2eyeballs = 1 sale", which has never been true for music, theater, software, or anything else.
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Old 2010-05-03, 14:32   Link #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seven|x_x View Post
there is more incentive against trying to break a banks encryption than a games. im gonna go out on a limb and say that most of the guys out there cracking could have a go at a bank, but they'd rather not mess up and spend 50+ years in prison.
Let's try and make this clear. Here is the reason why everyone chases after DRM:

DRM can be thought of as a "static" system. Once the system is published, it is only a matter of how long the attack against the keys takes. Even with systems like BD+/AACS, it just comes down to the time complexity of the overall system. Every door has the exact same lock and the question is "how long till the lock is removed/modified/picked". This is why everyone goes after DRM: You open one lock, you open them all.

SSL/Banks/etc are a "dynamic" system. How they work is known, but that doesn't help you. The problem is to actually compute the solution to each exchange within a reasonable amount of time. You can gain access to one exchange, but it doesn't help you with any of the others and it is very likely the data is worthless by that point. Similarly, it is trivial for them to change the "lock" on you setting you all the way back to square one.

Last edited by bayoab; 2010-05-03 at 14:57. Reason: Silly typo
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Old 2010-05-03, 15:03   Link #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past, but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
In the cases where DRM actually does harm customers, saying that companies shouldn't use it is certainly not just bullshit coming from pirates. And I see a lot of companies implementing these BS DRM schemes and then not seeming to care about the damage (for example, I know PC gamers whose internet is flaky enough that the "persistent internet connection required for single player" stuff in C&C 4 and Assassin's Creed II would drive them nuts - they can only use steam because it allows you to resume downloads). Screw that.
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Old 2010-05-03, 15:07   Link #56
TheFluff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Exactly. If what TheFluff says about the technology used in encryption is true, that it's not some incomprehensible voodoo magic, then obviously the banks are doing something right, despite huge incentives to break encryption schemes, and content publishers are doing something wrong. Maybe publishers are simply not scary enough, the state doesn't have strict enough laws, the police is useless in dealing with petty crime etc.
It has nothing to do with how scary the banks are or the punishments. These days punishment for large scale copyright infringement are comparable with those for large scale fraud or outright theft anyway.

There are plenty of people who work on trying to crack globally used critical security schemes, just for the challenge of it. The GSM phone network's encryption was cracked by a German engineer recently, for example (fortunately for most of us he wasn't interested in using his powers for evil), and there are a lot of academics (and probably underground crackers as well) researching possible attacks against commonly used cryptographic techniques.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Its implications are actually a bad thing for the stability of a marketplace as a whole.
Why?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Sorry, but normal market forces influence products handicapped by artificial scarcity as well.
Your point being?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past, but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
No.
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Old 2010-05-03, 16:22   Link #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord of Fire View Post
Why does that matter? If I buy a CD, it should be mine to do with it whatever I like, be it copying, lending it to a friend or even selling it (because that too is illegal if you take copyright laws literally). Copyright laws and DRM prevent me from using a CD I legally bought the way I want to. That should be illegal, not the ones circumventing this 'security system' to get to the contents they are legally entitled to.
In the US, your rights to dispose of a legitimate copy of a work are not restricted in the slightest as long as you don't make another copy. You can lend, rent, sell or shoot a .22 through it, and copyright law does not apply. This is called the first-sale doctrine, and it has been part of American copyright policy since time immemorial. Not all countries follow this doctrine, of course, though it does appear that signatories to the controversial ACTA treaty might have to accept American notions of "first-sale," and "fair-use" as well. Note that you're not considered to have bought the rights to duplicate the work, nor can you use your copy for a "public performance." But other than making copies there's little else that you're prohibited from doing with that book or DVD.

As for the more general question of why producers adopt DRM schemes, first, you have executives in the media industries who don't understand any of these technologies, but sure as hell demand that anything released to the public needs to be "protected," regardless of the technical realities involved. Second, and probably more important these days, is that reverse-engineering of DRM systems is largely forbidden by the Digital Millenium Copyright Act. Even if a DRM system is ineffective, distributing tools for breaking it can lead to both criminal and civil penalities under the "anti-circumvention" clauses of the DMCA.
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Old 2010-05-03, 17:06   Link #58
Mentar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyth View Post
No, I'm not arguing DRM is a good thing, I've actually been burned by one of its consequences in the past,
Now what? Take your pick.

The truth which is really evident to see for anyone with a trace of a brain: DRM has failed in the marketplace. It was tried, and it was a disaster. Even the music and movie industry has finally seen the writing on the wall and given in, abandoning DRM. How anyone can still argue that what failed with the huge power of the RIAA and cronies behind it would now succeed in the anime marketplace will forever remain a mystery to me.

Quote:
but just looking at the situation with a tunnel vision of "content should be (DRM-)free because it inconveniences the honest customer" is bullshit coming from pirates and we all know it.
It's not bullshit at all, it's the plain truth. I remember that when Crunchyroll started to freely stream anime, I was donating 20 bucks to show my appreciation for the initiative. That was until I found out that AFTER my donation was taken, I was informed that I wouldn't have the right to watch the streams since it wasn't licenced for my area.

If there was a way to download-to-keep anime in a properly managed form (hi-quality, properly translated, timed and preferably typeset, without DRM, so that I can collect and watch it offline whenever I want to), I would be willing to pay for it. If there was something as silly as an indemnification purchase, like paying some bucks in return for simply the right to do with the source what I pleased for my own use, I'd be willing to pay for it.

Instead, the marketing geniuses insist on releasing sources mastered in shitty quality on Blurays which cost 50-60$ for two lousy episodes. And crap-quality streaming which is unavailable in wide parts of the world.

As long as this idiocy isn't changed, fansubbing won't die. It provides the product which _I_ am interested in, in a quality which is usually technically superior to the "professional" works. And yes, for free. It wouldn't have to be like that. But as long as there is no acceptable alternative, so be it.
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Old 2010-05-03, 21:19   Link #59
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I agree that DRM is weak right now, I'm not arguing about that. What I'm saying is that it can improve. You are all pointing out weakness of the current DRM, whose to say that cannot be improved upon? No one here is creating and advancing technology, so I doubt anyone can accurately predict what's in store in the future. Even if DRM has to change it's basic premise, it's possible that it can improve in a way that makes it much more difficult to crack. How? Hell if I know, I don't get paid to think of algorithms that can be used.

By the way, when I was using the bank analogy, I was referring to actually breaking into the bank and taking all the money. I wasn't referring to hacking into the systems, though either way works as my analogy was based on improving the systems.

I do want to comment on SSL. SSL, although secure in itself, is not secure in implementation. One can easily bypass SSL through a man-in-the-middle attack (MITM). With browsers also slacking on warning users it's very easy to use programs such as sslstrip and perform MITM attacks. Security not only depends on the algorithm being used, but also how it is being implemented.
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Old 2010-05-03, 22:19   Link #60
MeoTwister5
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Where I can learn to be lonely.
Age: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alamarco View Post
I agree that DRM is weak right now, I'm not arguing about that. What I'm saying is that it can improve. You are all pointing out weakness of the current DRM, whose to say that cannot be improved upon? No one here is creating and advancing technology, so I doubt anyone can accurately predict what's in store in the future. Even if DRM has to change it's basic premise, it's possible that it can improve in a way that makes it much more difficult to crack. How? Hell if I know, I don't get paid to think of algorithms that can be used.

By the way, when I was using the bank analogy, I was referring to actually breaking into the bank and taking all the money. I wasn't referring to hacking into the systems, though either way works as my analogy was based on improving the systems.

I do want to comment on SSL. SSL, although secure in itself, is not secure in implementation. One can easily bypass SSL through a man-in-the-middle attack (MITM). With browsers also slacking on warning users it's very easy to use programs such as sslstrip and perform MITM attacks. Security not only depends on the algorithm being used, but also how it is being implemented.
Yet everyone's argument against DRM isn't solely tied to it's fault, but the restrictive concept behind the DRM is, in and of itself, fundamentally flawed in believing that causing such a restriction to both piraters and legitimate consumers is consumer friendly, and the assumption that legitimate consumers are more than willing to suck it up with the messy and absurd restrictions (which they obviously aren't) just to go against pirating.

You can't improve on a security measure that's, for all intents and purposes, meant to cause a bother not only to piraters but to regular buyers as well. The fact again that piraters have more or less cracked DRM forms while everyone else suffers for it. One cannot deny the current fact that DRM's ARE meant to be restrictive, and any and all attempts to improve it will simply cause some more discomfort one way or another.
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