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Old 2013-12-17, 07:10   Link #1
faridatos
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Join Date: Dec 2013
Anime Director

Can you explain, if an anime director decide to adapt frame of frame from manga, how he use his own directing style ?
BTW, what Tetsuro Araki style/trademark when directing (give example if can )
Sorry for my bad English
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Old 2013-12-19, 01:55   Link #2
TinyRedLeaf
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Originally Posted by faridatos View Post
Can you explain, if an anime director decide to adapt frame of frame from manga, how he use his own directing style?
In short, he doesn't. It's a total cop-out. The production committee might as well forgo having a director and viewers might as well go read the manga instead. That's my view, and many AnimeSuki members would know that I firmly believe that anime adaptations need not be exact copies of the manga to be "faithful" to the source material.

There must be room for artistic licence, and any anime adaptation is already subject to interpretation in the first place. It's only a question of degree, and not whether the anime should be allowed to differ from the manga in terms of story-boarding.

But rabid manga fans would vehemently disagree. That's fine. We disagree in principle.

That aside, you've got to understand that making an anime is very different from writing or drawing a manga. Mangaka usually work alone, or perhaps in writer-artist pairs. In contrast, anime production involves production committees and large teams of writers, artists, animators (who include the in-betweeners, the ones who produce the bulk of the frames that animates the art), sound and music producers and the voice actors.

An anime director is therefore essentially a manager of diverse talents. It's not always possible to discern a "style" that's distinct to the director and it may well be the case that certain "styles" emerge depending on who the director worked with on the project.

I'm not familiar enough with Tetsuro Araki to identify his style, let alone talk about it.
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Old 2013-12-19, 09:33   Link #3
SeijiSensei
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Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
It's not always possible to discern a "style" that's distinct to the director and it may well be the case that certain "styles" emerge depending on who the director worked with on the project.
Indeed. What "style" joins together Nakamura Kenji's Edo-period Mononoke with his later works like [C], Tsuritama, and Gatchaman Crowds? Even though all three of those are set in contemporary Japan with vaguely sci-fi premises, they are not very alike either. They are all "glossy," but that seems pretty common across many recent anime.
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Old 2013-12-19, 10:08   Link #4
Sheba
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From what I watched of Tetsurou Araki, namely Death Note, Highschool of the Dead, Kurozuka AND Attack on Titan, he likes to use various budget saving tricks such as still shots, with heavy dose of speedlines and zoom in. He also loves his spinning shots.

He is the kind to not indulge in subtlety and can turn the mundane into awesome, such as the potato chip scene in Death Note. Tetsurou Araki is at his best when he goes with larger-than-life characters.
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Old 2013-12-19, 10:24   Link #5
faridatos
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Originally Posted by Sheba View Post
From what I watched of Tetsurou Araki, namely Death Note, Highschool of the Dead, Kurozuka AND Attack on Titan, he likes to use various budget saving tricks such as still shots, with heavy dose of speedlines and zoom in. He also loves his spinning shots.

He is the kind to not indulge in subtlety and can turn the mundane into awesome, such as the potato chip scene in Death Note. Tetsurou Araki is at his best when he goes with larger-than-life characters.
i have watched HOTD and Attack on Titan , but Attack on Titan dont make me emotional, where i heard Araki's can make viewer emotional
btw i heard, Death Note was emotional, but DN not Tragedy isn't it ?
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Old 2013-12-19, 10:35   Link #6
Sheba
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Nah. Araki's style is mostly about kicking every subtlety pretenses to the curb and making the anime larger than life. Whatever you feel something out of it is definitely on the Your Mileage May Vary level.
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Old 2013-12-20, 10:01   Link #7
faridatos
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Originally Posted by Sheba View Post
Nah. Araki's style is mostly about kicking every subtlety pretenses to the curb and making the anime larger than life. Whatever you feel something out of it is definitely on the Your Mileage May Vary level.
like manipulation ???
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Old 2013-12-30, 08:29   Link #8
all_flying
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Originally Posted by faridatos View Post
Can you explain, if an anime director decide to adapt frame of frame from manga, how he use his own directing style ?
BTW, what Tetsuro Araki style/trademark when directing (give example if can )
Sorry for my bad English
Step-by-step of how making an anime (production committee stuff(s), ignored):
1. Director and script writer do a meeting to decide how the story will went in the latter production. In this meet, they'll decide which is important, which is not, which would be left out which would be extended, etc etc etc. Target: Script done (in detail or not so detail)
Spoiler for script:

2. Character Design, and art design. They'll decide if they'll go with the original design or deviate (a little or not-so little) from the original ones. Character design usually being decided in the committee meeting if the producer makes a certain request(s). Art design is every properties used like weapons, room layout, school map, etc
Spoiler for simple design:

3. From the (detailed) script and character + art design, director and primary key staff (eps director, assistant, animation director, series composition etc) meets up to decide the storyboard. They will decide how will the scene goes (according to the script), which exposition needed and what element(s) will be added, as well as any other effect(s) and "camera" works. This is also where the director's (or episode director or unit director) style comes to play. Whether they'll let their staff to inject their own style, or just hammer down everything to the same circle (like Hayao Miyazaki's). Or if they'll follow the manga's layout.
Spoiler for storyboard:

4. From this (also detailed) storyboard, it will be handed down to each animation director and key animator (supervised by director/eps director) to draw key animation/key frame based on the previous storyboard. In this stage, the skill and talent of each key animator will shine. In Evangelion series (not movies) for example, you'll notice that sometimes the animation style changed. It was due to key animators injecting his/her own style to the works. So you'll find some cuts will be stands out more from the rest because of different key animators usually works for one episode/scene. The finished product is called "genga" or key animation.

5. In-betweening. Drawings between each key frame to create sense of movements. This affect how smooth the transition between each frames will be.... in frame-per-seconds (yep, you know it )
Spoiler for animation:

From this point, the animation sequence is practically done. Of course there are still background which produced together when making the animation, layout (which I forgot to mention) was set between storyboard and key animation, timing, coloring, CG, finishing, cutting, dubbing and video editing which comes later on, which will be/not to be affected by the director's style. But of course the main director will stick with the production and post-production till the end while making various request and instructions, like what OP/ED will be used, what kind of OST/BGM, how will be the OST/BGM played out, seiyuu performance, additional after effect later on. Which I won't bother to explain since, that's not what you're asking right?
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Old 2013-12-30, 22:45   Link #9
Iron Maw
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Originally Posted by all_flying View Post
Rather elaborate post
Thanks a lot for the informative post. Up till now I've only had a vague general idea how the step-to-step process worked, but this clarified and confirmed all for me.
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Old 2014-01-02, 08:04   Link #10
all_flying
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Originally Posted by Iron Maw View Post
Thanks a lot for the informative post. Up till now I've only had a vague general idea how the step-to-step process worked, but this clarified and confirmed all for me.
There are still a lot of holes actually. One of the most important part after storyboard is layout. You can say, layout is more detailed storyboard before it will be animated. They decided "camera" angle, pan, zoom, background & foreground position in this phase before entering key animation process. For some director, this phase is very important to inject their particular style to the screen.

So, usually (not always), director style comes from storyboard, and layout (Like Shinbo, Satoshi Kon, Takemoto). Some director also doing their own key animation (like Imaishi and Kigami). And of course director makes various request to the music producer. Some director even makes very peculiar OST for their anime like Miyazaki's.
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Old 2014-01-07, 10:03   Link #11
faridatos
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hmm , thx for the explanation
so in layout phase, where a lot director was inject their particular style like Araki, Shinbo ...
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Old 2014-01-10, 01:12   Link #12
solomon
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This can get into real film school theory type of conversation, and I am far too out of college to front on that so.................(hehe).

Generally speaking, in my watching experience anime adaptions are slaves to the manga except when they have to create filler. This can be good or bad dependent on your point of view.

Me? While manga itself is already a powerful cinematic and narrative experience, sometimes I would appreciate a little more "interpretation" as opposed to "adaption" as far as anime is concerned, making it more like film.

Mind you there ARE exceptions, KareKano, Ghost in the Shell and the first FMA are very well known examples. But by and large anime based on existing manga (especially popular ones) are basically media tie-ins.

On Araki? What can we say, he likes shit DARK. Araki seems to stick to certain subject matter, and I like the stories he chooses and illustrates them with such intensity.

Now as to how much influence a director has on the nitty gritty? That depends on show to show. This is why I can't wait to go to Japan and get my hands on all the juicy magazines and production books to learn about all this shit!
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