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Old 2013-10-22, 14:46   Link #2281
Reckoner
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Yes, and I'm also saying their work reflects on the studio as a whole.
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Old 2013-10-22, 14:47   Link #2282
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Even to a high degree, yes. Management gets the blame for putting the wrong people together. They are paid appropriately to make the right decisions so people get to keep their jobs and grow their business. To me, it seems like you and people who share your argument don't understand the notion that organizations need to be ... organized. An organisation sets goals so that each and every one of its members works towards it. For that to happen, there needs to be some sort of structure in place to keep the machine going. The management at the very least has a say in which direction the works should be taken, if not, they are lousy managers.

In the end, the product is out and us viewers get to decide whether we like it or not. The thing with hardcore fans such as yourself is that you don't just watch the product, you are also interested in the production schedule, so it is easy to say "well, Ishidate fucked up." But someone like me, I just see the product. I decide whether it's worth my attention or not and post about it. Yes, real people stand behind a brand, what a revelation! But this goes for everything else in life, not just your favorite anime studio. In fact, if I look at it with this in mind, I kind of feel sorry for Ishidate, not because he's taking so much crap from us and his loyal fans throwing him under the bus to protect The Brand, but because he probably didn't have complete control over the creation of this work. If he did, he probably would have been doing independent animation. But I understand what it means to be part of an organization, not sure you guys do.
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Old 2013-10-22, 14:51   Link #2283
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckoner View Post
Yes, and I'm also saying their work reflects on the studio as a whole.
I digress on that matter: when you have a long time director for a given studio, this assertion is indeed true (i.e: Shinbo for Shaft), but otherwise it is not the case.

Freelance directors and newcomers aren't exactly reflecting the whole studio. Otherwise, you are telling me that KyoAni is completely schizophrenic considering how certain series like LS has glaring difference in term of scenes despite being the same studio and same series.

Likewise, I really doubt you can define studio like A-1 picture considering the huge amount of directors they hire, and they aren't the only studios doing that.
On the same tangeant, you can recognize gimmicks from the same director in different series from different studio: Kishi Seiji for his persistent tendency to add gameplay gimmicks in his adaptations, Yamauchi and his retro style and peculiar animation preferences, etc etc.

Defining a studio with a director is not exactly applicable unless the said director has worked with a given studio for a certain time.
On the other hand, depending of the director, you can easily recognize their "touch" and perspective due to how a series was produced, regardless of the studio involved.
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Old 2013-10-22, 14:54   Link #2284
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Continuing with the digression,do studios always hire directors?From what I understand sometimes the committee hires one and assigns him/her to the studio.
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Old 2013-10-22, 15:00   Link #2285
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Originally Posted by Kaisos Erranon View Post
b) I would also like to remind you that you are talking about a show with only three episodes out as of this writing. If I were to judge whether a show had "succeeded" or "failed" after only three episodes, Hyouka would be a pretty but boring show with underdeveloped, artificial characters and Chu2Koi a vibrant, comic masterpiece.
Sadly I've seen way too many people doing that. It's no secret that I find Hyouka one of the best shows KyoAni has done lately. It was a show that didn't wow me at first but by the end of it's run I was completely sold. It was not only well written but also extremely pretty to look at. It pulled together everything that KyoAni does best and left out most of what people usually complain about the studio even if it's sadly what effectively sells: random moe slapstick hijinks.
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Old 2013-10-22, 15:04   Link #2286
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I really wish I could just say to a customer "It wasn't my fault, we just hired the guy that screwed up". That's never worked well in my experience though even if I successfully convince people it's someone else's fault.

Coming as someone that gets yelled at a lot for assigning people that screwed up, I can't say I care for such distinctions. A screw up on the company's worker part, is the company's fault. And the ones on top will pay regardless of who's at fault. Case in point-- people on Yelp don't review individuals. The lost revenue from mishaps is still lost revenue regardless of who did it. Doesn't matter if you fire the one at fault if the customer's trust is already hurt. I'd like to hear more from the numerous armchair businessmen on the internet though.

There's those outlier cases where the employee went crazy or some shit, and sure in those cases you can't blame the business. I don't think we're discussing that.

Blame shifting is just a business/politics game in which you try to avoid the axe. I do it all the time, but in reality most of us know we're just kidding ourselves. It has no place in legitimate discussions. This is why they always try to blame the customer.

We can go on about how things are out of one's control and they are but a cog in the machine, but ultimately this is true of most jobs. This view is akin to scrunching against a building with a magnifying glass and deciding this is the truth. Missing the forrest for the trees, eh? And the truth is that a manager that hires subpar employees didn't do a good job of hiring. This is exactly why we view these entities as a whole; blaming the cogs isn't very meaningful. "Windows didn't crash, explorer.exe did!"

And none of this makes Kyoto Animation any better or worse. There's no point in trying to shift blame or praise away or from stuff; what matters is the product that comes out.
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Old 2013-10-22, 16:23   Link #2287
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Originally Posted by totoum View Post
Continuing with the digression,do studios always hire directors?From what I understand sometimes the committee hires one and assigns him/her to the studio.
No. Studios often suggest a particular director, but there's no rule of thumb. Sometimes the recommendation might come from an external producer (i.e. someone at Aniplex) or another staff member, such as the lead writer. At the end of the day, the production committee signs off on the selection as a group.
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Old 2013-10-22, 16:31   Link #2288
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckoner View Post
Yes, and I'm also saying their work reflects on the studio as a whole.
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Originally Posted by cyth View Post
Even to a high degree, yes. Management gets the blame for putting the wrong people together. They are paid appropriately to make the right decisions so people get to keep their jobs and grow their business. To me, it seems like you and people who share your argument don't understand the notion that organizations need to be ... organized. An organisation sets goals so that each and every one of its members works towards it. For that to happen, there needs to be some sort of structure in place to keep the machine going. The management at the very least has a say in which direction the works should be taken, if not, they are lousy managers.

In the end, the product is out and us viewers get to decide whether we like it or not. The thing with hardcore fans such as yourself is that you don't just watch the product, you are also interested in the production schedule, so it is easy to say "well, Ishidate fucked up." But someone like me, I just see the product. I decide whether it's worth my attention or not and post about it. Yes, real people stand behind a brand, what a revelation! But this goes for everything else in life, not just your favorite anime studio. In fact, if I look at it with this in mind, I kind of feel sorry for Ishidate, not because he's taking so much crap from us and his loyal fans throwing him under the bus to protect The Brand, but because he probably didn't have complete control over the creation of this work. If he did, he probably would have been doing independent animation. But I understand what it means to be part of an organization, not sure you guys do.
Responding to both of you due to similar viewpoints. You're looking at this from an organizational standpoint similar to that of a typical business, not the part of entertainment. When these projects are determined, it's not fully up to the producers/executives to fully determine who is leading the project. They ask directors if they want to take on the responsibility of directing and series composers the same for them. The directors choose to work on the project or not, thus I place more emphasis on them. If you look at all the interviews I've mentioned, it's always stated as "the producer came up to me and asked if I wanted to do (blank)" emphasizing the entire role of the producer. Following that, the creative control of the project then goes to the director/series composer (which is what I've said repeatedly). This is true for KyoAni and all studios alike (just as Klash mentioned).

The role of ensuring that progress is made falls upon the Project Manager (and you'll see them credited for each episode they work on). They are in charge of ensuring that work is completed on time. There's the organization you are mentioning cyth. The Project Manager does not control the content; that is up to the director/series composer followed by episode director/storyboarder and then even the key animator makes some decisions upon how to present a scene.

To me, when you say "KyoAni screwed up!" there is ton of ambiguity behind said statement to the point of nothingness. Instead of blaming the company as a whole (which happens frequently amongst anime fandom), it's certain people who are of fault, just like certain people are to credit when things go well. I know it takes more effort to learn who's in charge of things, but it's worthwhile to realize who you really want to blame and who you want to credit so you can make better viewing decisions later.

The examples given of random organizations/programs don't really fit into the entertainment structure like they do elsewhere. There's a certain amount of control given to the director of a project that doesn't fit other corporate structures. They're more hands-on than project leads in gaming/software creation to counter Wing's example. This is their vision of the project. Klash gave great examples of directors that have their own quirks that would be present regardless of what studio was assigned to animate that particular project.

Quote:
Originally Posted by totoum View Post
Continuing with the digression,do studios always hire directors?From what I understand sometimes the committee hires one and assigns him/her to the studio.
Nope. Studios do not hire directors, the producers hire the director and pay them separately from the animation budget.
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Old 2013-10-22, 17:40   Link #2289
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Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
To me, when you say "KyoAni screwed up!" there is ton of ambiguity behind said statement to the point of nothingness. Instead of blaming the company as a whole (which happens frequently amongst anime fandom), it's certain people who are of fault, just like certain people are to credit when things go well. I know it takes more effort to learn who's in charge of things, but it's worthwhile to realize who you really want to blame and who you want to credit so you can make better viewing decisions later.

The examples given of random organizations/programs don't really fit into the entertainment structure like they do elsewhere. There's a certain amount of control given to the director of a project that doesn't fit other corporate structures. They're more hands-on than project leads in gaming/software creation to counter Wing's example. This is their vision of the project. Klash gave great examples of directors that have their own quirks that would be present regardless of what studio was assigned to animate that particular project.
To pick a little bit more on this (I promise I'll stop after this, I have things to do), do you believe that guidebooks, interviews, tweets and such stuff provide an accurate picture of what is going on behind the scenes? If not, are you content that you will only be able to extrapolate and speculate what really happened? You gave me the Free! guidebook example... I mean, it's great that you immerse yourself in this stuff as much as you do, but... I want to frame this right so that it doesn't come across as insulting, but do you believe that the information provided through official channels properly reflects the truth?

Let me give an example, I used to be a big data geek as well, wanted to know all information about upcoming anime. Quite frequently I would find myself correcting others that such and such information hasn't been officially confirmed. This "official framework" was what to me was the scope of acceptable information. But we know that this world isn't ideal. The Japanese are very good at keeping information about their internal processes private unless they want to release it. They are usually very selective about what they release. Some simply lie, but the best lies are half-truths, the unfinished picture. This is just typical PR stuff, so I don't want to call anyone a liar, they are just doing their best to keep the brand as palatable and as presentable to the world as humanly possible.

Japan's anime industry has to compete with new emerging otaku industries. Part of this effort is to look for new business models. Most new business models in the otaku biz these days talk about how to package what they call "communication." You can see this in the way many Japanese otaku buy BDs because of participatory reasons. Similarly, I would not exclude the possibility that the numerous interviews, booklets, guidebooks, even personal tweets can be part of making brands more engaging for fans. The way some fans refer to directors, script writers, lead animators etc. by their names, the amount of love the studio receives while the critics and the trolls aren't around, the kind words ... KyoAni fans really love the studio. I don't see so much love anywhere else. But I believe this is for a reason. There is more information available about them. Their PR works. They have a way to connect to their audience unlike many other studios (perhaps Trigger does this better because Twitter) and they say the right things.

So when you talk about the internal structure of how entertainment production works, you're not really saying much about it, just what was told in these official, controlled interviews and publications. We all know how the creative process is supposed to be. The director is more like a coordinator who keeps the project going. They have more or less creative control, depending on the project. But because the public can cling to an established idea of how the creative process works, it's also easier to feed information and play to stereotypes. It's easy to say "director X worked tirelessly to produce the best storyboard with the writers", "we all enjoyed working on Y character, I fell in love with her ww" when you have the luxury to keep quiet about other things. The fans don't really have the right idea how the production played out. What you guys have is either presented to you, extrapolated or assumed. Who knows what kind of organizational structure they really have. Maybe it's flat, maybe it's hierarchical, maybe someone holds more creative control because he's favored with some investor, maybe the script writer is a stuck-up old man nobody dares to oppose, etc. Really, we don't know. The product is called a product because it's at an intersection of different parts of the creative process. The director had a big part in how that went, but who knows what has influenced his decisions, which of his decisions got overwritten etc. Example: Yamakan's control got taken away, he wasn't let to do his thing and was subsequently fired.

That's why pointing the finger at Ishidate is irresponsible, especially if you're on a quest to promote higher awareness of the studio's inner workings. But at some point you have to realize what was presented to you is all made up to a certain degree.
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Old 2013-10-22, 18:04   Link #2290
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Originally Posted by Klashikari View Post
I digress on that matter: when you have a long time director for a given studio, this assertion is indeed true (i.e: Shinbo for Shaft), but otherwise it is not the case.

Freelance directors and newcomers aren't exactly reflecting the whole studio. Otherwise, you are telling me that KyoAni is completely schizophrenic considering how certain series like LS has glaring difference in term of scenes despite being the same studio and same series.

Likewise, I really doubt you can define studio like A-1 picture considering the huge amount of directors they hire, and they aren't the only studios doing that.
On the same tangeant, you can recognize gimmicks from the same director in different series from different studio: Kishi Seiji for his persistent tendency to add gameplay gimmicks in his adaptations, Yamauchi and his retro style and peculiar animation preferences, etc etc.

Defining a studio with a director is not exactly applicable unless the said director has worked with a given studio for a certain time.
On the other hand, depending of the director, you can easily recognize their "touch" and perspective due to how a series was produced, regardless of the studio involved.
There are different models of studios out there, yes. When you go into a studio's portfolio, you are going to see a bunch of different anime. Some may be more similar than others, and in the case of studios like A-1 who are huge and act more like mercenaries than anything, it's also possible that each individual project is very different. Indeed, if you are A-1, it might be impossible to build a consistent style and each project depends solely on who is backing it, and who the director is, etc.

But that's not really my point. I'm talking about simple reputation. If A-1 as a company is unable to coordinate enough talented staff, or manage a project and a budget for each work they are contracted for, the quality of their works will suffer. If they consistently produce mediocrity across the board... Well yes, each individual project is going to matter in the grand scheme of things. Together, it builds the studio's portfolio, and hence reputation.

I think maybe you're combining my view point with someone else because little of what I have been saying is about the "style" of the studio, and more about the reputation. I was simply commenting on the idea that somehow it is incorrect to levy criticism towards the studio as a whole simply because some of their staff members or contracted people screwed up. This is not how things work in the real world. Now if you want to pick and choose who deserves the most blame within a given project, that's another discussion. I think cyth did quite well to point out the dangers in such an approach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
To me, when you say "KyoAni screwed up!" there is ton of ambiguity behind said statement to the point of nothingness. Instead of blaming the company as a whole (which happens frequently amongst anime fandom), it's certain people who are of fault, just like certain people are to credit when things go well. I know it takes more effort to learn who's in charge of things, but it's worthwhile to realize who you really want to blame and who you want to credit so you can make better viewing decisions later.
My point is that they assume responsibility for the project. Kyoani's reputation is on the line when a given work is made. If you want to go into the studio's behind the scenes, then there is certainly plenty of stuff you can point to that resulted to any given failure. Maybe Kyoukai no Kanata had a crappy source material that wasn't suited to the director's vision. Maybe the director was simply inexperienced and didn't know how to approach the work. Maybe the writer sucked. This is all incidental though and often is just speculatory. These factors matter more to the studio themselves than it does to outsiders who are not necessarily going to be researching this in their free time. And as cyth pointed out, it carries certain dangers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ultimatemegax View Post
The examples given of random organizations/programs don't really fit into the entertainment structure like they do elsewhere. There's a certain amount of control given to the director of a project that doesn't fit other corporate structures. They're more hands-on than project leads in gaming/software creation to counter Wing's example. This is their vision of the project. Klash gave great examples of directors that have their own quirks that would be present regardless of what studio was assigned to animate that particular project.
See above where I commented to Klash that my main points were about reputation, not really style.

There is a reason why people freaked out when JC Staff chose to adapt Little Busters, including Klash if I am to call someone out here (Nothing personal). This is despite JC Staff being a huge studio with many many works, and many different directors filtering through their system.
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Old 2013-10-22, 18:35   Link #2291
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I think a pro sports analogy works pretty well here.

Let's say KyoAni is the New York Yankees. The New York Yankees General Manager is like whoever makes hiring decisions for KyoAni, and has some level of oversight over the company as a whole. The New York Yankees Manager (same as a Coach in most team sports) is like the Director for a KyoAni show.

Now, the Yankees get off to a horrible start, and most Yankees fans blame the Manager. Let's say the fans are right. Then yes, most of the fault lies with the Manager. He takes the lion's share of the blame. But if the Yankees General Manager doesn't replace the Manager in a reasonably timely fashion (at the very least, having a new Manager to start next season), then the Yankees General Manager is going to start taking some flak himself.

Unfortunately, we don't really know who makes hiring decisions for KyoAni (well, ultimatemegax might know, but most of us don't) so we can only talk about KyoAni as a full organization when it comes to their top-level decision-making because there's no other name to go to.


Now, KnK might bounce back. Or it might simply have slow and steady improvement that means it eventually becomes a really good show for a solid majority of viewers. I'm not ruling that out. If that happens, then Ishidate becomes vindicated, and most of this conversation becomes moot.

But, just for argument's sake, let's say that KnK becomes a disappointed and doesn't sell that well. Then at the very least I'd expect Ishidate to not be back for any KnK sequel, and I'd expect KyoAni to go to a different Director for their next couple of shows.

Do we all agree on that much, at least? That if KnK bombs, then "KyoAni" (whoever makes hiring/oversight decisions there) bears responsibility to take corrective measures for that.
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Old 2013-10-22, 18:54   Link #2292
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Now, KnK might bounce back. Or it might simply have slow and steady improvement that means it eventually becomes a really good show for a solid majority of viewers. I'm not ruling that out. If that happens, then Ishidate becomes vindicated, and most of this conversation becomes moot.

But, just for argument's sake, let's say that KnK becomes a disappointed and doesn't sell that well. Then at the very least I'd expect Ishidate to not be back for any KnK sequel, and I'd expect KyoAni to go to a different Director for their next couple of shows.

Do we all agree on that much, at least? That if KnK bombs, then "KyoAni" (whoever makes hiring/oversight decisions there) bears responsibility to take corrective measures for that.
Except we don't know how they truly measure success. In sports, the league standings are obvious, and "wins good, losses bad". But as much as fans like to play the "inside baseball" game of comparing BD sales to see if their "team is winning", that's only one part of the equation. We don't see the big picture the way the production committee does. We don't know what their actual budget and sales projections were. So even if the fans decide that it's a failure by whatever limited metrics they have available to them, the director and the director's employer may not see it that way. We see the end-result, but most of the game is actually played behind the scenes.
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Old 2013-10-22, 19:42   Link #2293
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Except we don't know how they truly measure success. In sports, the league standings are obvious, and "wins good, losses bad". But as much as fans like to play the "inside baseball" game of comparing BD sales to see if their "team is winning", that's only one part of the equation. We don't see the big picture the way the production committee does. We don't know what their actual budget and sales projections were. So even if the fans decide that it's a failure by whatever limited metrics they have available to them, the director and the director's employer may not see it that way. We see the end-result, but most of the game is actually played behind the scenes.
I think your argument is overstated. We see enough metrics, and we come across enough viewer feedback, to have a reasonably good idea of whether a show was a success or not (both commercially, and critically).

Besides, if we take your argument to its logical conclusion then it means that absolutely everything KyoAni does becomes beyond criticism, and the studio can never be questioned for any of its decisions. I find that a very narrow and overly restrictive approach for anime viewers to take to the anime industry.
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Old 2013-10-22, 21:14   Link #2294
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I think your argument is overstated. We see enough metrics, and we come across enough viewer feedback, to have a reasonably good idea of whether a show was a success or not (both commercially, and critically).

Besides, if we take your argument to its logical conclusion then it means that absolutely everything KyoAni does becomes beyond criticism, and the studio can never be questioned for any of its decisions. I find that a very narrow and overly restrictive approach for anime viewers to take to the anime industry.
That's not the argument I'm making. But I am saying that this game of trying to attribute blame and then questioning the studio (or whoever) for not taking action about our perceptions of their problems is a futile endeavour. In the end, we're customers who have to decide with our wallets whether we are or are not interested in the product that is being sold, and it's in that light that we offer criticism: criticism of the product from our perspective as a viewer. All this armchair quarterback stuff is a fun game, but way out of our pay league. We don't truly understand enough about their business to even think to advise them on the best course of action.

(And honestly, on some off-chance that any Kyoto Animation executive were to read this thread, the "here's how I'd run your business" or "here's who I choose to blame for the problem I perceive" stuff is totally useless because we simply can't know. What's valuable is the raw, honest opinion about the product itself.)
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Old 2013-10-22, 22:15   Link #2295
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So when you talk about the internal structure of how entertainment production works, you're not really saying much about it, just what was told in these official, controlled interviews and publications.[...] The product is called a product because it's at an intersection of different parts of the creative process. The director had a big part in how that went, but who knows what has influenced his decisions, which of his decisions got overwritten etc.

That's why pointing the finger at Ishidate is irresponsible, especially if you're on a quest to promote higher awareness of the studio's inner workings. But at some point you have to realize what was presented to you is all made up to a certain degree.
This is true, of anything, especially in commercial film and TV business. But perception still plays a big part in how one goes about staff.
Different directors have different approaches, which can be told apart; executive meddling and collab brainstorming exist, probably quite a bit in an organized business such as Kyoani (as opposed to, say, early 00s Studio 4ºC), but the big staffers, the guiding hands of the product give the final call, and it doesn't really matter who influenced them or where they got their ideas. You'll have other staffers to credit for their specialized tasks.
I don't really care about marketing interviews and such things, I take them with a grain of salt. But reading the credits and building exposure give you a definite perspective on the approaches of the staffers.

I wouldn't really hold it to Ishidate - KnK is well-produced, polished for what it is, even if it doesn't break any new ground. I just think the material is terrible. Of course it's the job of the director and screenwriter to make things palatable as they see fit, but they're not here to change the entire personality and core of what they're adapting. It's still a very commercial project with a clear target audience it wants to please.

In the end, whether or not people generally blame "Kyoani" or "Ishidate" for a show they didn't like seems more a matter of semantics to me. You can't expect everyone to know the intricacies of the production process and get acquainted with the staff (not even fans; how many people are Kyoani fans because they find Haruhi moe?), and they shouldn't be expected to know the technical backstage details of the entertainment they consume.
Of course, that doesn't excuse all the posts that happen in this thread whenever a show by this studio airs, and some people feel the need to repeat how they're "getting desperate", aren't using "the most profitable strategy" or other terrible diatribes on the "Kyoani brand".

I do think you can talk about the studio as a sort of whole, especially a close-knit bunch like Kyoani. It's similar to Gainax in its early days where Anno and Sadamoto helmed everything. This shouldn't mean disregarding specificity and individuals, but they're all under the same name in the end. I think there's a distinct feel common to most Kyoani works, and I have already talked about it in this thread. At the same time, I can easily hold the opinion that Hyouka has a certain finesse and tact that is lacking in their other shows, or that Nichijou was a breakthrough in aesthetics and animation.
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Old 2013-10-25, 03:12   Link #2296
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On a scale of 1-10, how is Jukki Hanada faring as a series director for Kyoukai no Kanata?
And who is responsible for casting KENN as Akihito? I feel that he's terribly miscast.
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Old 2013-10-25, 03:14   Link #2297
Kaisos Erranon
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KENN as a generic male lead is much more interesting to listen to than Fukuyama was in the same role, IMO.
He sounds unconventional, which helps.
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Old 2013-10-25, 03:21   Link #2298
Marcus H.
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I dunno, his side of most exchanges with Mitsuki for example lacks something.
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Summer 2014: Hanayamata, Rail Wars!, Rokujouma no Shinryakusha!?, Sabagebu!, Gekkan Shoujo Nozaki-kun and Hanamonogatari.
Autumn 2014: Log Horizon S2, Amagi Brilliant Park and Fate/Stay Night (2014).
Excited for Mitou Shoukan://Blood Sign?


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Old 2013-10-25, 09:47   Link #2299
darkchibi07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus H. View Post
On a scale of 1-10, how is Jukki Hanada faring as a series director for Kyoukai no Kanata?
And who is responsible for casting KENN as Akihito? I feel that he's terribly miscast.
Errr, I think you meant Taichi Ishidate as director. Hanada is mostly the screenwriter.

Now Ishidate as a director, hmm, something tells me he needs to learn how to build a foundation for the premise and setting. I found it strangely off-putting in a KyoAni show that he missed that considering all other KyoAni shows manage to enamor me with their settings even stuff like Tamako Market, Nichijou, and FMP: the Second Raid.

I don't have a rating until Kyoukai no Kanata is done, but something tells me he's going to feel a very heavy blow when that series doesn't become a hit compared to the last 2 upcoming directors Yamada and Utsumi who did made big hits with K-ON and Free respectively.
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Old 2013-10-28, 09:43   Link #2300
all_flying
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus H. View Post
On a scale of 1-10, how is Jukki Hanada faring as a series director for Kyoukai no Kanata?
And who is responsible for casting KENN as Akihito? I feel that he's terribly miscast.
Hatta's should wait more for KyoKana. Since this kind of show is story-driven, not just episodic stand-alone chapter. As for Jukki Hanada's script, I'd say 5. He (or she?) needs to learn more about supernatural drama.

The production committee of course. Who else?
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