AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2010-06-10, 07:27   Link #101
DragoZERO
Spoilaphobic
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by K_Babyy View Post
I'm right there with you. I've been battling depression for about the same amount of time and it's not anything severe, I just have such low self confidence, that I don't really enjoy anything I do and I don't have any faith in myself while doing it.

It's tough and it's been even harder this past year since I had my daughter at such a young age, so there's issues with the father and all the emotional crap that comes with becoming a teen parent.

She's the sunshine in my life though, I just keep telling myself that I have to make it out of this rut for her and keep going to make myself better.

Let me add that I have also been diagnosed with clinical depression and I've been on different medications, but none of them changed anything for me. Have you tried going to the doctor and talking about it/getting medication? I know it's not for everyone, but I'm told all the time that depression worsens when it goes untreated.
If the medicine did nothing it was either a poor choice or you don't have depression. Therapy would be the answer a situation like yours.

It does get worse as time goes on - it's a negative spiral, that's part of what depression is. One reason why you do therapy is to learn to not go in that spiral.
DragoZERO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-06-10, 10:05   Link #102
ChainLegacy
廉頗
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Massachusetts, US
Age: 24
I'm happy to hear your treatment has worked for you, DragoZERO, but people are iffy about antidepressants for a reason: they have a very checkered history and sometimes can even lead to advanced depression and/or suicide (or even more horrible, look at the homicide-suicide connection with SSRIs). Top-level doctors don't even fully understand the mechanisms by which SSRIs operate, so don't try to reduce it to a simple chemical fix.
ChainLegacy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-06-10, 11:26   Link #103
DragoZERO
Spoilaphobic
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChainLegacy View Post
I'm happy to hear your treatment has worked for you, DragoZERO, but people are iffy about antidepressants for a reason: they have a very checkered history and sometimes can even lead to advanced depression and/or suicide (or even more horrible, look at the homicide-suicide connection with SSRIs). Top-level doctors don't even fully understand the mechanisms by which SSRIs operate, so don't try to reduce it to a simple chemical fix.
That's why I said seek other opinions and research yourself. I merely stress that medicine helps. People often think ill of it and all mean while it's the answer to the problem. And not just with depression, but with other stuff too, like ADHD.
DragoZERO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-06-11, 22:56   Link #104
K_Babyy
Fullmetal Heart
 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Florida
Age: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragoZERO View Post
If the medicine did nothing it was either a poor choice or you don't have depression. Therapy would be the answer a situation like yours.

It does get worse as time goes on - it's a negative spiral, that's part of what depression is. One reason why you do therapy is to learn to not go in that spiral.
I've been to therapy on and off for years. Reasons for quitting would be that I couldn't afford it at the time or I needed to switch doctors and just took too long of a break inbetween. I'll admit I do need to start talking to someone again, I have noticed a small difference in my behavior and the way I think when I'm able to talk to someone who isn't a friend/family member and who also has a medical degree.

The main problem is that I just haven't attacked this wholeheartedly. I've been told I have clinical depression since I was like fourteen and I haven't really stuck with anything long enough for it to start making a big difference for me.
__________________
K_Babyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2010-06-12, 13:07   Link #105
DragoZERO
Spoilaphobic
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by K_Babyy View Post
I've been to therapy on and off for years. Reasons for quitting would be that I couldn't afford it at the time or I needed to switch doctors and just took too long of a break inbetween. I'll admit I do need to start talking to someone again, I have noticed a small difference in my behavior and the way I think when I'm able to talk to someone who isn't a friend/family member and who also has a medical degree.

The main problem is that I just haven't attacked this wholeheartedly. I've been told I have clinical depression since I was like fourteen and I haven't really stuck with anything long enough for it to start making a big difference for me.
Yeah, it's definitely hard to get back on the bike after you get off it. Just keep at it.

Try out those books or others similar if you were recommended any. Less costly alternative, lol.
DragoZERO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 05:02   Link #106
Kafriel
Senior Guest
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Athens (GMT+2)
Age: 25
On August 31st, I enrolled in the army, as everyone in my country is obliged to do at some point in their lives. First week in, the boots had started hurting my feet, so I went to the doctor and he said, "as long as you don't have external injuries, you're fine, you'll get used to it".
Second week was marching week, so my heel was slightly torn open; dropped by the doctor again to get a bandage on it, he insisted that I'd have gotten used to it by the time the wound closed up. After taking the oath, I was given 4 days off, out of which I spent two in bed, recovering.
Last week, the armed services opened up: standing guard, patrolling, etc. became all we would do, from dawn to dawn. Naturally, I collapsed after serving 6 numbers in 5 days (each number being 6 hours plus the time it takes for the next shift to change you, in my case being an extra 3 hours per day). Back to the doctor I went, and instead of giving me a day or two free of service, or at least sending me to the hospital to an orthopedic, he prompted me to the camp's psychologist, who suggested giving me a suspense of service (that is, my 9 months of service), which I told him I'd accept only as a last resort.
So, he gave me till afternoon to decide, and I told him I didn't want to leave and come back in 6 months, because that would mean 3 extra months of service, provided the new bills apply from Jan 1st 2012. Despite my decision, I was handed not one but two referrals to a psychiatrist...who decided I cannot serve any longer and gave me a year away, despite my will.
Now, I won't lie, I cried in the army, and I felt alone, I was told (and at one point believed) that soldiers stop being humans the second they set foot in camp, and my morale had shattered by last Sunday. Still, I don't believe this means I suffer from some kind of serious form of depression, or that my pain is a psychosomatic reaction to the concept of the army...more like, I was dead tired after getting a proper meal once every two and a half days, and spending three days with five hours of sleep. Even though I mentioned all of the above, I was still sent home. Am I right to question their decisions, am I really just being pushed back at their whim, or was the psychiatrist right to send me home and ask me to see an expert outside of camp?

One thing I know is, I won't be talking to a psychologist ever again :S
__________________
Kafriel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 08:59   Link #107
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kafriel View Post
On August 31st, I enrolled in the army, as everyone in my country is obliged to do at some point in their lives. First week in, the boots had started hurting my feet, so I went to the doctor and he said, "as long as you don't have external injuries, you're fine, you'll get used to it".
Second week was marching week, so my heel was slightly torn open; dropped by the doctor again to get a bandage on it, he insisted that I'd have gotten used to it by the time the wound closed up. After taking the oath, I was given 4 days off, out of which I spent two in bed, recovering.
Last week, the armed services opened up: standing guard, patrolling, etc. became all we would do, from dawn to dawn. Naturally, I collapsed after serving 6 numbers in 5 days (each number being 6 hours plus the time it takes for the next shift to change you, in my case being an extra 3 hours per day). Back to the doctor I went, and instead of giving me a day or two free of service, or at least sending me to the hospital to an orthopedic, he prompted me to the camp's psychologist, who suggested giving me a suspense of service (that is, my 9 months of service), which I told him I'd accept only as a last resort.
So, he gave me till afternoon to decide, and I told him I didn't want to leave and come back in 6 months, because that would mean 3 extra months of service, provided the new bills apply from Jan 1st 2012. Despite my decision, I was handed not one but two referrals to a psychiatrist...who decided I cannot serve any longer and gave me a year away, despite my will.
Now, I won't lie, I cried in the army, and I felt alone, I was told (and at one point believed) that soldiers stop being humans the second they set foot in camp, and my morale had shattered by last Sunday. Still, I don't believe this means I suffer from some kind of serious form of depression, or that my pain is a psychosomatic reaction to the concept of the army...more like, I was dead tired after getting a proper meal once every two and a half days, and spending three days with five hours of sleep. Even though I mentioned all of the above, I was still sent home. Am I right to question their decisions, am I really just being pushed back at their whim, or was the psychiatrist right to send me home and ask me to see an expert outside of camp?

One thing I know is, I won't be talking to a psychologist ever again :S
You served only 9. We in Singapore serve 22-24. TRL and Makube served 30 in their olden days.

It isn't depression. It is just an adjustment disorder - humans crack when their environment change suddenly.

And since you have said that your morale shattered, it is obvious that you are at the bottom. There is no where else to go but up. The other option is to just stay there and end up slitting your wrists in 2-3 months time.

The only advice I can tell you is to look forward to the end of the 9 months. Do a date countdown, and suddenly you'll feel that army life is so much more easier.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 09:34   Link #108
Kafriel
Senior Guest
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Athens (GMT+2)
Age: 25
Was planning to, but I got literally kicked out...my papers had already been signed before my decision, and I can apply again after 6 months minimum, although I was told (i.e. lied to) that it was feasible after a month.
Quote:
The other option is to just stay there and end up slitting your wrists in 2-3 months time.
Well, you probably know this, but if someone commits suicide while serving their time, everyone else immediately gets out, counting as if they've served all their time, and the camp shuts down for a certain period. Now, while I think that preventing such cases is all good, I still find this course of action extreme, especially when I was told by the brigadier general to "drop by his office to discuss this" in the afternoon, by which time he had left the camp, and yet my papers had his signature on...
__________________
Kafriel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 12:36   Link #109
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
Don't let the experience put you off psychologists entirely, I myself have gotten good help from psychologists when I was at some of my lowest ebbs.

It's more likely an institutional problem within the army, and they just don't want to deal with you. Sucks, but that's life.
DonQuigleone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 13:11   Link #110
DragoZERO
Spoilaphobic
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA
Age: 28
You went to a military one... a little biased, I think.
DragoZERO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 15:15   Link #111
Kafriel
Senior Guest
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Athens (GMT+2)
Age: 25
Well, I suppose that counts for a lot...really left an impression on me though, total disregard of what I want, and nobody told me why I was forced out...I think that much is my right to know Anyway, I'll leave this matter in the past for now, I lean towards Don's words, that they just didn't want to bother with me any longer.
__________________
Kafriel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-29, 16:54   Link #112
yourfriendrick
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kafriel View Post
First week in, the boots had started hurting my feet, so I went to the doctor and he said, "as long as you don't have external injuries, you're fine, you'll get used to it".
Second week was marching week, so my heel was slightly torn open; dropped by the doctor again to get a bandage on it, he insisted that I'd have gotten used to it by the time the wound closed up. After taking the oath, I was given 4 days off, out of which I spent two in bed, recovering.
Last week, the armed services opened up: standing guard, patrolling, etc. became all we would do, from dawn to dawn. Naturally, I collapsed after serving 6 numbers in 5 days (each number being 6 hours plus the time it takes for the next shift to change you, in my case being an extra 3 hours per day). Back to the doctor I went, and instead of giving me a day or two free of service, or at least sending me to the hospital to an orthopedic, he prompted me to the camp's psychologist, who suggested giving me a suspense of service (that is, my 9 months of service), which I told him I'd accept only as a last resort.
So, he gave me till afternoon to decide, and I told him I didn't want to leave and come back in 6 months, because that would mean 3 extra months of service, provided the new bills apply from Jan 1st 2012. Despite my decision, I was handed not one but two referrals to a psychiatrist...who decided I cannot serve any longer and gave me a year away, despite my will.
...
Am I right to question their decisions, am I really just being pushed back at their whim, or was the psychiatrist right to send me home and ask me to see an expert outside of camp?

One thing I know is, I won't be talking to a psychologist ever again :S

I can't observe the extent of your physical injuries, but it sounds to me that the problem was with your body. It wasn't able to take the strain on your feet, and you didn't have the endurance.

It doesn't sound to me like your mind or emotions were the issue. It sounds like your feet couldn't keep up with multiple injuries.

This does not look like a case for a shrink IMHO. It looks like the army wanted to get you back into civilian health care in order to fix your feet, and then punish you with three months of extra service in order to deter others from imitating your example.

It looks to me like the shrink lied and invented a psych issue in order to justify the army's decision to get rid of you temporarily without giving you a real medical discharge.


Edit: I would advise you to get a civilian doctor to provide evidence that you were and are PHYSICALLY injured by your training, and that your inability to meet the army's demands was a PHYSICAL inability.
yourfriendrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 02:57   Link #113
Alchemist007
自分のチームにいるよ。
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Age: 25
Depression is a funny thing. There are apparently numerous causes, no real known 'cures.' I wonder if it's just something hardwired into us so that we realize there's something wrong with us? Our lifestyle that is, perhaps the majority that get depressed do so because their life is missing something that humans need. Adventure? Danger? Friends? Or perhaps something we need to get rid of...stress? Monotony? I think everyone has some feel of what depression is like, I get a bit of the seasonal blues. I'm usually look forward to seasons before they come because I'm sick of the previous one, but eventually...the cycle repeats

I think I know the feeling of adventure too, but it never lasts long at all simply because I'm a recluse with few (atm not available) friends. I try to look out for my interests though, whether it's biking, watching anime, hanging out with my bro or whatever. I suppose after a while we all just want some significant change in our lives, at least until we find something we can call perfect if that exists.
__________________
Alchemist007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 07:48   Link #114
SaintessHeart
Ehh? EEEEHHHHHH?
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Age: 25
Depression is a contagious disease, it tends to spread from one person to another.

Usually it starts with a discouraged person transforming someone into a pessimist, then highly negative, then depression. I have had people saying that I suffer from chronic depression, I simply tell them - so, what do you think I can do about it?

The responses vary. The correct reply to "see a shrink" and "I don't know" is "Fuck you/off" - these are people who have no interest in helping you in your business and are simply trying to strike up a conversation; they are wasting your time.

Those who dig deeper, be careful, some are manipulators. Leak a little bit of your problems, one at a time, and see their response. Then try their suggestions, and if it works, tell them and see if they ask a return favour. Good Samaritans usually don't expect anything back.
__________________

When three puppygirls named after pastries are on top of each other, it is called Eclair a'la menthe et Biscotti aux fraises avec beaucoup de Ricotta sur le dessus.
Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
SaintessHeart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 08:08   Link #115
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Depression is a contagious disease, it tends to spread from one person to another.

Usually it starts with a discouraged person transforming someone into a pessimist, then highly negative, then depression. I have had people saying that I suffer from chronic depression, I simply tell them - so, what do you think I can do about it?
I wouldn't really describe it that way. I've always thought of Depression as an existential despair that largely comes from the inside.

People from all backgrounds, fortunate and not so fortunate, succumb to it. I think the main outside factor that does induce depression is being "trapped", IE feeling as though it's impossible to change your circumstances.

Quote:
The responses vary. The correct reply to "see a shrink" and "I don't know" is "Fuck you/off" - these are people who have no interest in helping you in your business and are simply trying to strike up a conversation; they are wasting your time.

Those who dig deeper, be careful, some are manipulators. Leak a little bit of your problems, one at a time, and see their response. Then try their suggestions, and if it works, tell them and see if they ask a return favour. Good Samaritans usually don't expect anything back.
I don't usually talk to people about my depression, so I really can't comment. Usually the problem for depressed people is that they don't open up about their problems.

It's really best to talk to people you can trust, usually a close family member or friend. However that can sometimes not work well, total strangers also work well, in this case a counselor or shrink. They've seen it all before.
DonQuigleone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 10:24   Link #116
AHH
クレアクレアクレアクレア!
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Age: 22
I've never understood how talking about your problems is supposed to help. It didn't work for me. Talking couldn't do anything to fix the problems that caused the depression. Therapy didn't do anything, either. Maybe I was just one of those exceptions.

Despite having been depressed in the past (or not? I really have no clue with how antidepressants affected me) I have no idea how one gets out of it. I was put on antidepressants which made me more suicidal, violent, act extremely hateful towards my closest friends and family, made people think I had bipolar disorder... This all fixed itself when I stopped taking them, but left a residual effect of sorts where I just... don't really genuinely care about anyone other than myself. I can empathize, but I feel like my emotions as a reaction of empathy are faked, I guess? I've never made close friends after I was on antidepressants, and all my former close friends are no longer in contact with me. I don't feel like I'll be that sad if a family member or friend dies or just stops talking to me. Actually, if people didn't go out of their way to talk to me I would probably stop communicating with them entirely. I just can't care enough to actively reach out to people anymore. It's like I'm only a few steps away from being a psychopath, or something similar.

And since I'm on that subject, I also know someone who fought with SSRI withdrawal syndrome for years. My suggestion to anyone, just to be on the safe side, is to not take antidepressants. I know they work really well for some people, but how are you supposed to know which group you'll fall into?
__________________

Je t'appelle, nuit, rends moi tes mensonges
AHH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 10:48   Link #117
Sides
Senior Member
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Edinburgh
Age: 32
Self diagnosis is always a bad thing. It is always better to seek professional help. If you think you have been wrongly diagnose then look for another opinion. Taking any sorts of medication, legal or illegal, to combat ones problem is tempting, but if it goes wrong it can end up really bad. Also giving advise to people only because something works for oneself is not OK, because everyone is different, even for identical twin. Talking about ones problem work for some not for others. I personally feel better if I can help others, not necessary with emotional or psychological problems, but things like repairing fences, electronics and stuff like that. It may sound strange but seeing/making other people happy make me kind of happy.

Everyone feels blue from time to time, maybe just channel it into something creative. But if you feel really down, go and see a pro, i mean they spend years and years studying these subjects.
Sides is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 10:58   Link #118
ChainLegacy
廉頗
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Massachusetts, US
Age: 24
Look into the nutritional side, too. Omega-3 deficiencies, zinc deficiencies, magnesium deficiencies, etc can all contribute to depressive symptoms. If anyone has interest I'll type something more in depth on how to use nutrition to combat depression. Just remember, people really often overlook this fact, you are what you eat. Literally, the food you put into your body is broken down and becomes a part of you.
ChainLegacy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 11:19   Link #119
Zenemis
Megabuddy
*IT Support
 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Perth, Australia.
Age: 6
Nutrition definitely plays a major role - living an active and healthy lifestyle can dramatically improve your outlook on life.

A cliche, but it's true.
__________________
Zenemis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-09-30, 11:30   Link #120
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHH View Post
I've never understood how talking about your problems is supposed to help. It didn't work for me. Talking couldn't do anything to fix the problems that caused the depression. Therapy didn't do anything, either. Maybe I was just one of those exceptions.
For me, talking about it helps a lot. When I'm depressed it's very easy for me to retreat inwards and see no one, becoming a recluse. In that kind of circumstance, when I speak to nobody for days, maybe even weeks at time, it's very easy to slip into quasi-delusional thinking (it's extremely difficult to explain).

When I talk to someone about my troubles it grounds me in reality again. It allows me to let off steam. The great thing about shrinks is that they don't judge you or anything, doesn't matter how weird you are, or whatever you come out with, they'll sit and listen, and they'll ask you the right questions to try and help you get to the root of your problems.

It also helps relieve the loneliness, just having someone listen really takes a load off.

However, it's not really a dramatic change or anything. I certainly don't come out of a session feeling like I have a whole new understanding of the world. And if you expect anything dramatic from a shrink you're only going to be dissapointed. And that dissapointment might actually be worse then any of the benefits talking it out might give you. The benefit is more after the fact. It sorta breaks you of your rut. I find it easier to engage with society again after seeing a shrink.

We are social animals after all, and a lot of depressed people find the loneliness very hard, as they don't feel comfortable talking to their freinds and family about what's bugging them, and often when they do, those friends and family don't understand, or tell you to just "snap out of it" or "stop thinking so much" as if that helps... Psychologists and counsellors will fill that void for you. They'll help you externalize your problems. And when your problems are on the outside, not the inside, they don't seem quite so scary.

I've never taken medication for my depression, and frankly, I'm in no rush to. I've heard anti-depressants give you a kind of "dead" feeling inside. Considering that at the worst of my depressive episodes I actually feel dead and apathetic towards everything, that hardly sounds like an improvement,
DonQuigleone is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
depression, sad

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:57.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.