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Old 2014-01-10, 03:31   Link #201
Triple_R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solomon View Post
Just a general observation here.

It seems that beyond original expectations that the streaming market is alive and healthy? Can I say that?
Why is it "beyond original expectations"? For several years now, I've seen many anime fans (not necessarily here on AS, but throughout the internet as a whole) predict both of the following...

1) Physical media is going to die.

2) The future of anime is in digital distribution.


Well, these predictors seem to be wrong about 1 (at least as it pertains to anime), but 2 is starting to look up for them.

The success of CR proves that many anime fans were sincere about wanting a legal digital distribution method as long as it addressed speed (simulcast) and price (not that expensive) concerns. I don't find it that surprising, especially in an increasingly on-line world.


Quote:
I think that while there still will always be a fansub movement, that the companies have FINALLY made some headway in providing what fans have wanted all along.
Agreed.


Quote:
Now, call me nostalgic and naive. But I still kinda think that an anime has REALLY made it, if it's on TV. (Give Attack on Titan a good dub and an 11pm saturday nite slot on Adult Swim and easily 1 million each week). What do you all think?
So does this mean that Space Dandy has already REALLY made it?
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Old 2014-01-10, 05:39   Link #202
0utf0xZer0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
Why is it "beyond original expectations"? For several years now, I've seen many anime fans (not necessarily here on AS, but throughout the internet as a whole) predict both of the following...

1) Physical media is going to die.

2) The future of anime is in digital distribution.

Well, these predictors seem to be wrong about 1 (at least as it pertains to anime), but 2 is starting to look up for them.
Yeah, but go back five years and I don't think many people would have predicted that the industry would get its act together so quickly. There was a time when legal digital anime essentially meant really shitty streams designed to encourage you to trade up to the DVD and some DRMed 360P stuff from Funimation.

So yes, I am shocked that:
a) CR is allowed to stream 720P over what seems to be the long term (and not just for a few months until the discs come out).
b) That you can get so much stuff from just CR and don't have to mess around with a lot of different content providers and their in house systems.

To be honest, I worry that things will become more fragmented over time. Though to be fair, I find it surprising that Netflix has as much content provider support as it does too.

Quote:
So does this mean that Space Dandy has already REALLY made it?
Different scenario. For Attack on Titan, getting on CN would be like getting drafted to go from juniors to the big league. Space Dandy's position strikes me more as more akin to "starting a playoff run". The definition of REALLY MAKING IT gets reset.
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Old 2014-01-10, 08:56   Link #203
Marcus H.
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Quote:
So does this mean that Space Dandy has already REALLY made it?
Nah. Dandy was made mostly for the Western audience, and cannot be used to gauge if anime "has made it".
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Old 2014-01-10, 08:59   Link #204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0utf0xZer0 View Post
Yeah, but go back five years and I don't think many people would have predicted that the industry would get its act together so quickly.
Five years is a pretty long time for an entertainment industry to get its act together, if you ask me. If it took much longer, I'd strongly suspect either gross incompetence on the part of the anime industry, or that the digital distribution method wasn't as potentially lucrative as a lot of anime fans thought it was.

Only incredibly dumb entertainment industries leave a lot of money on the table for no good reason for several years. And whatever faults there may be about the anime industry, they've long struck me as being very good at maximizing revenue streams from their core fandom. So perhaps that's why I'm not surprised or shocked that we are where we are now - I've never considered the anime industry that incompetent. I was confident that if foreign fans proved there was significant income to be had in pursuing digital distribution, that the anime industry would be there soon enough. Thankfully, it looks like foreign fans proved that (through CR), and so here we are today.


Quote:
Different scenario. For Attack on Titan, getting on CN would be like getting drafted to go from juniors to the big league. Space Dandy's position strikes me more as more akin to "starting a playoff run". The definition of REALLY MAKING IT gets reset.
What makes the difference, in your view? Because I didn't see any qualifiers in what Solomon wrote.
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Old 2014-01-10, 14:57   Link #205
solomon
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Hmmmm, my "really made it" was on the 90s/y2k kinda thought that a show could really go places in terms of audience reach and therefore prestige if on tv. Cause you know back in the day all you had was the DVD releases and fansubs but if you made it on tv, it was a huge thing for the show and potential ripple effects in getting more casuals to watch it.

But remember im a 90s/y2k kid so i remember those heady toonami/adultswim days with rosy nostalgia.

I guess, "really made it" was a bad choice of words.

What I wanted to say is that while, streaming is good for most stuff. I still think that if you get 1 or 2 market friendly shows on the air, it really is a hallmark in the domestic industry, especially in this contracting times.

As for incompetence from the industry, I think the ANN answerman pointed out the fact that anime is controlled by big Japanese corporations who even by conservative western standards are VERY stodgy, risk averse and inward looking. The Japanese DVD and Goods market is always gonna be the main bread and butter but obviously fansubs were cutting into potential overseas profits so much that they FINALLY moved on it.

At least that's how I interpret it.

On fox zero's worry about fragmentation.............

Generally more providers is better for the consumers but because anime is so niche it CAN be worrysome if you reach a breaking point. Then you seem like you're no different from the heady DVD bubble days.

What is the Netflix situation? Do they have a limited library? Because Hulu is one thing, but add netflix (specifically a netflix administered wide anime lineup) to the library and you potentially have more consumers than just those hardcores seeking out crunchyroll, neon alley and the like.
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Old 2014-01-10, 15:20   Link #206
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@solomon - Ok, I see what you're saying now.

In spite of my age, I only started delving heavily into anime around 2006 or so. So I'm more familiar with the more modern context rather than the 90s/early turn of the century one where anime was going strong in the west.

Truly new anime showing up on Adult Swim again is certainly a good sign for the anime industry.
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Old 2014-01-10, 16:20   Link #207
0utf0xZer0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triple_R View Post
Five years is a pretty long time for an entertainment industry to get its act together, if you ask me. If it took much longer, I'd strongly suspect either gross incompetence on the part of the anime industry, or that the digital distribution method wasn't as potentially lucrative as a lot of anime fans thought it was.

Only incredibly dumb entertainment industries leave a lot of money on the table for no good reason for several years. And whatever faults there may be about the anime industry, they've long struck me as being very good at maximizing revenue streams from their core fandom. So perhaps that's why I'm not surprised or shocked that we are where we are now - I've never considered the anime industry that incompetent. I was confident that if foreign fans proved there was significant income to be had in pursuing digital distribution, that the anime industry would be there soon enough. Thankfully, it looks like foreign fans proved that (through CR), and so here we are today.
IMO, CR's success has stemmed from it acquiring enough shows - especially first runners - to a) make its subscriptions a good value and b) give it an immense profile in the industry. Funimation offers subscription services priced similarly to CR's, but I don't think anyone here would argue that Funi's option is competitive for people wanting first-run anime.

I never expected them to have so much success in acquiring shows. They've completely and utterly steamrollered the competition in that regard Even in hindsight I can't thing of any evidence that would suggest they'd have such success in acquisitions.

Quote:
What makes the difference, in your view? Because I didn't see any qualifiers in what Solomon wrote.
Normally, I consider a show's success from the perspective of the Japanese companies involved in financing and producing it. For them, getting on Cartoon Network really is making it in the US.

What makes Space Dandy different IMO is that Cartoon Network appears to be making such a big bet on it (as indicated by it getting simulcast). IMO, that means their expectations of it should also be entered into an evaluation of whether the show is successful or not.
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Old 2014-02-22, 04:42   Link #208
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“If you watch just Naruto, your subscription money goes toward supporting that show. If you watch more than one show, the money is split proportionately among those shows depending on which ones you watch the most.”
If you pay $7 a month to CR and CR pays 60% of it, CR pays $4.2 a month to the rights holders.

If you watch 100 episodes a month, each episode would get $4.2 / 100 = $0.042 per episode
If you watch 50 episodes a month, each episode would get $4.2/50 = $0.084 per episode

If you watch 1 episode a month, that episode will get $4.2

If you watch 0 episode a month, then everybody get an equal share / similar to assuming all episodes get watched.

At least that is how I interpreted it.
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