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Old 2014-08-08, 03:19   Link #161
kuroishinigami
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I kind of understand Tiny's argument, and inclined to agree with him, but at the same time, I'm kind of sad that the last bastion of triple-A handdrawn animation have no choice but adapting to the newest trend if they want to survive. It's true that change is inevitable, but wn't you feel sad if someday Mozart's symphony has to be adapted into pop-style just because playing classic music is no longer viable cost-wise?(even though the fan are still there).

It really can't be helped I guess. The only other way for Ghibli to survive and stay true to their philosophy of fully handdrawn animation is giving up apeealing to the masses, and only target their product to their current niche purist loyal fans at an increased price, and even then I'm not sure how long they can survive using such business model.
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Old 2014-10-22, 10:46   Link #162
crysisnet
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When i watch sanzoku no musume ronja , the only i can think is " Well done gibli you're really the greatest u make the anime tv series lvl up several times. God I love gibli they should make more anime, their work is master piece
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Old 2014-10-23, 03:13   Link #163
Ugoki
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They should just disband Ghibli and make the people there work on a new WMT series.

In 2D.
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Old 2014-11-29, 15:42   Link #164
TinyRedLeaf
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New York (Nov 28, 2014): In The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness, a compelling documentary by Mami Sunada that sees release in New York this week, Hayao Miyazaki largely comes off well as a polite, diligent worker blessed with a stroke of genius.

But the man is also marked by moments of cynicism, resentment, and self-doubt that hint at a darkness behind his creations. "I don't ever feel happy in my daily life," he says. "How could that be our ultimate goal? Filmmaking only brings suffering."

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness focuses on Miyazaki as he works on The Wind Rises, a soaring, personal epic that he later announced would be his final feature film. In the background is his colleague and rival, Isao Takahata, who is planning to release the ethereal Tale of the Princess Kaguya on the same day as Miyazaki's movie.

The pair founded Studio Ghibli after Takahata took on Miyazaki as an apprentice; for a while they worked on animations together, but the younger Miyazaki wanted to direct his own features and soon became the bigger star.

Miyazaki doesn't hold back on his colleague, accusing him of having a personality disorder and leaving the studio in disarray. When announcing Princess Kaguya for the first time, producer Toshio Suzuki admits to reporters that Takahata has "never delivered a film on time or on budget", already knowing that the movie won't make the release date he's giving. "Takahata-san is incomprehensible. Does he not want to finish?" Suzuki later asks in exasperation.

Staff talk about how hard it can be to work under Miyazaki, but the footage of him working on storyboards, selecting and instructing voice actors, and advising artists on exactly how to convey his intended feeling shows just how astute and meticulous a director he is.

But its two-hour running time, matter-of-fact cinematography, and frequent delves into the esoteric assume some degree of knowledge regarding the subject matter, and often regarding Japan itself.

Miyazaki, for example, often embarks on extended soliloquies that are philosophical and eloquent but betray deep discomfort with the present order of things. The Fukushima disaster, for instance, has had a profound impact on his thinking.

"I'm a man of the 20th century," he tells us at one point. "I don't want to deal with the 21st."

THE VERGE

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness opens today at the IFC Center in New York City. It’ll be made available for download on Dec 9, 2014, before a DVD and video-on-demand release on Jan 27, 2015.
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Old 2015-08-24, 15:28   Link #165
l.kostas
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http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news...america/.92083

North American film distributor GKids announced on Monday that it will release Studio Ghibli and Isao Takahata's film Only Yesterday in theaters in North America in 2016.In addition to the theatrical rights, GKids has also licensed the non-theatrical, home video, and television rights for the film.GKids' theatrical release will correspond with the film's 25th anniversary.
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Old 2015-08-25, 02:32   Link #166
AnimeFangirl
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It's a nice thought, but Only Yesterday was pretty boring. The flashbacks to the girl's past were the only good parts IMO.
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Old 2015-11-07, 22:40   Link #167
l.kostas
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ANN: Hiromasa Yonebayashi and Studio Ghibli's When Marnie Was There (Omoide no Marnie) anime film won the Children's Jury Prize in the Animated Feature Film category of the Chicago International Children's Film Festival (CICFF).

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Old 2015-11-08, 16:54   Link #168
AnimeFangirl
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I doubt it had much competition. That's why I don't usually take cartoon awards all that seriously.
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Old 2016-02-05, 13:34   Link #169
TinyRedLeaf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l.kostas View Post
ANN: Hiromasa Yonebayashi and Studio Ghibli's When Marnie Was There (Omoide no Marnie) anime film won the Children's Jury Prize in the Animated Feature Film category of the Chicago International Children's Film Festival (CICFF).

I've been meaning to watch this for a long time. When I recently discovered that it's been nominated for Best Animated Feature Film at the 2016 Oscars, I decided to get around to it, at last.

Technically, it's amazing! The background art and character designs, and much more importantly, the animation, are among the best from Studio Ghibli in recent years. In my opinion, they surpass those of Arrietty and From Up On Poppy Hill. I especially loved the way vehicles moved in this movie — from cars, to bicycles to rowing boats. They had a certain heft and fluidity that's not often seen in animation any more.

The way the characters moved was also a marvel to behold — not just the smoothness and "real-ness" of it, but also the way the movement itself described the personality of the characters (for reference, take a look from 1:45 in the trailer below). I daresay the animation work matched, if not surpassed, even Hayao Miyazaki's effort in Ponyo (which, to be fair, wasn't really his best work in terms of animation).

The story, on the other hand, is a very odd-one-out in the Ghibli pantheon. It's decidedly melancholic, and the main character, Anna, is not very likeable for most of the film. This is one animated movie that's very much more for adults than children, not just because some scenes are likely too scary for children, but also because the movie's themes — of being abandoned, and coming to terms with it — are probably a bit too complex for young minds.

If you're patient, the revelation at the end will tie everything together satisfactorily. I'm not sure, though, that viewers would necessarily find the wait worthwhile. It's a worthy non-Miyazaki Ghibli film, especially given its immense technical quality, but I don't think it'll win the Oscar.

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Old 2016-03-15, 12:40   Link #170
l.kostas
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ANN: Studio Ghibli Animates Legendary Chōjū Giga Scrolls for Ad.
Totoro studio animates animals in 800-year-old "manga" to promote power company
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