AnimeSuki Forums

Register Forum Rules FAQ Members List Social Groups Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   AnimeSuki Forum > General > General Chat

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2011-07-26, 01:32   Link #201
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scanner View Post
FACT:
If 4 out of 5 people suffer from diarrhea, that means one enjoys it.
My, how logic has fallen.
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-26, 03:10   Link #202
Kylaran
A Priori Impossibility
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Age: 24
Send a message via Skype™ to Kylaran
More than half of the world's 6,000+ languages are expected to die out by the end of the 21st century, with some linguists speculating that two languages disappear every month. Language extinction occurs at a rate several times faster than species extinction.

Those of you who aren't native speakers of English, or who are bilingual native speakers of English, should think about your own heritage language and feel proud to speak it!
Kylaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-26, 10:16   Link #203
Endless Soul
Megane girl fan
 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
Age: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylaran View Post
More than half of the world's 6,000+ languages are expected to die out by the end of the 21st century, with some linguists speculating that two languages disappear every month. Language extinction occurs at a rate several times faster than species extinction.

Those of you who aren't native speakers of English, or who are bilingual native speakers of English, should think about your own heritage language and feel proud to speak it!
This is why we are encouraging our daughter to be bilingual or perhaps even trilingual like my wife. She's 4.5 years old and already fluent in both English and Mandarin. It will only help her in the future.
__________________
VF-19 and VF-22S from Macross Plus
Signature by ganbaru
Endless Soul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-26, 21:44   Link #204
Kylaran
A Priori Impossibility
 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Age: 24
Send a message via Skype™ to Kylaran
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endless Soul View Post
This is why we are encouraging our daughter to be bilingual or perhaps even trilingual like my wife. She's 4.5 years old and already fluent in both English and Mandarin. It will only help her in the future.
Unfortunately, by the time she becomes a teenager the chances of her being fully bilingual in both languages is significantly less for various reasons. Sending a child to language school helps, but just studying a language is obviously different from being immersed in it.

Here's another interesting tidbit for you all: Every baby in the world is born capable of differentiating between the approximately 200 sounds known to exist in human speech, but by the time they're 6 months of age they develop categorical perception of sounds in their language and become less attentive to unfamiliar sounds.

(Categorical perception refers to the phenomenon where certain stimuli are grouped into the categories and are processed by the brain as belonging to one group. For example, Japanese only has the tapped r, which causes many speakers of Japanese to hear English /l/ and /r/ as the tapped one, making differentiation harder. Coincidentally, English speakers will sometimes hear the Japanese /r/ as a /d/ sound because of the similar way these two consonants are produced.)
Kylaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 15:40   Link #205
Lord of Fire
The Voice of Reason
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Netherlands
Age: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylaran View Post
Unfortunately, by the time she becomes a teenager the chances of her being fully bilingual in both languages is significantly less for various reasons. Sending a child to language school helps, but just studying a language is obviously different from being immersed in it.
I think I get what you mean (that you can never speak another language as good as your native one after all, one will always be more dominant above the other), but as long as she keeps using her second language as much as possible next to her native language, I don't see why she can't be considered bilingual when she becomes a teen.
__________________
Lord of Fire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 15:49   Link #206
synaesthetic
blinded by blood
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oakland, CA
Age: 30
Send a message via AIM to synaesthetic Send a message via Skype™ to synaesthetic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylaran View Post
More than half of the world's 6,000+ languages are expected to die out by the end of the 21st century, with some linguists speculating that two languages disappear every month. Language extinction occurs at a rate several times faster than species extinction.

Those of you who aren't native speakers of English, or who are bilingual native speakers of English, should think about your own heritage language and feel proud to speak it!
Good and bad. The bad is obvious... lost history, culture and all of that.

The good, less so. The more people speak the same language, the more communication and by extension, commerce, is possible between those people. The more unified and globalised a society we become, the less likely we are to kill each other over petty differences.

Even the most ruthless, mercenary type wouldn't kill their own customers, after all.

@papermario13689: Our star won't explode. It isn't massive enough to become a supernova. Solar energy output will increase within the next billion or so years to the point where Earth is no longer habitable by most forms of life. By the time the sun expends all of its hydrogen and helium supply, it will swell into a red giant and cool down significantly. Unfortunately for Earth, however, the surface of the sun will swallow up half of the planet. But by that time, the Earth would have already been converted into a blasted wasteland almost devoid of life, so it's not like much would be lost.
__________________
synaesthetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 16:34   Link #207
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Quote:
Originally Posted by synaesthetic View Post
@papermario13689: Our star won't explode. It isn't massive enough to become a supernova. Solar energy output will increase within the next billion or so years to the point where Earth is no longer habitable by most forms of life. By the time the sun expends all of its hydrogen and helium supply, it will swell into a red giant and cool down significantly. Unfortunately for Earth, however, the surface of the sun will swallow up half of the planet. But by that time, the Earth would have already been converted into a blasted wasteland almost devoid of life, so it's not like much would be lost.
Ah, that is good to know. I first heard supposed fact in the 4th grade, and began questioning aspects of it in the 6th grade when we studied the Sun's composition and the sciences behind the elements that composed it.

Nobody ever told me different, but it's good to have a second voice in this.
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 18:45   Link #208
synaesthetic
blinded by blood
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oakland, CA
Age: 30
Send a message via AIM to synaesthetic Send a message via Skype™ to synaesthetic
Massive stars, those suns that are hundreds of times the mass of our star, do become supernovae when they run out of hydrogen and helium to fuse. It's just smaller stars that simply swell into a red giant, puff off their outer layers in a planetary nebula and eventually stabilize as white dwarfs.
__________________
synaesthetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 18:59   Link #209
DonQuigleone
Knight Errant
 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Age: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylaran View Post
More than half of the world's 6,000+ languages are expected to die out by the end of the 21st century, with some linguists speculating that two languages disappear every month. Language extinction occurs at a rate several times faster than species extinction.

Those of you who aren't native speakers of English, or who are bilingual native speakers of English, should think about your own heritage language and feel proud to speak it!
Eh, I feel little attachment to Irish. It's kinda cool for the occasional phrase, but I wouldn't mind if it died. There's almost no literature of any worth in it, and would perhaps be better as the preserve of academics.

Languages are a utility, in themselves they hold little value, it's what they allow you to do. Speak to people, or read certain literature. So Greek and Latin are far more valuable then some New Guinean language spoken by 100 people.
DonQuigleone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 19:15   Link #210
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Quote:
Originally Posted by synaesthetic View Post
Massive stars, those suns that are hundreds of times the mass of our star, do become supernovae when they run out of hydrogen and helium to fuse. It's just smaller stars that simply swell into a red giant, puff off their outer layers in a planetary nebula and eventually stabilize as white dwarfs.
Ah yes, I recall hearing this Grade 6 science class. Just want to clarify one other thing- do all stars eventually expel their contained elements, or can some manage to stabilize without the expulsion-to-stabilization process?
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 19:28   Link #211
Ithekro
The Comet is Coming
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Republic of California
Age: 37
Our sun will likely do something like the Ring Nebula in the future:
Spoiler for Ring Nebula:


A supernova would look more like the Crab Nebula. Which exploded with such force and light it was seen brighting up the night sky here on Earth when the event's light reached us. It was so bright it could be seen in the daytime.
Spoiler for crab nebula:
__________________
Dessler Soto, Banzai!
Ithekro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 20:14   Link #212
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Ah, the joys of astronomy. Nebulae are fascinating as always and now I'm reminded of the "Red Rectangular Nebula", a protoplanetary nebula.


The shapes and colours that form during natural occurrences like this are flooring. As a child I actually feared how far space stretched out, but now I'm learning all the aspects of it.
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 21:02   Link #213
Endless Soul
Megane girl fan
 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
Age: 46
It never ceases to amaze me to be shown just how small and insignificant we really are.
__________________
VF-19 and VF-22S from Macross Plus
Signature by ganbaru
Endless Soul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 22:32   Link #214
synaesthetic
blinded by blood
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oakland, CA
Age: 30
Send a message via AIM to synaesthetic Send a message via Skype™ to synaesthetic
Quote:
Originally Posted by papermario13689 View Post
Ah yes, I recall hearing this Grade 6 science class. Just want to clarify one other thing- do all stars eventually expel their contained elements, or can some manage to stabilize without the expulsion-to-stabilization process?
Of course they do. How do you think elements heavier than helium even exist?

In a nutshell, when nuclear fusion happens, two lighter nuclei are mashed together to form one heavier nucleus. This happens in the cores of stars up until iron, in which any further fusion will result in more energy lost than released by the fusion reaction. During a supernova event, the tremendous pressures and heat will mash nuclei together and create loads of heavier-than-iron elements.

Google the topic "stellar nucleosynthesis" if you want to learn more about how this works.
__________________
synaesthetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-27, 22:38   Link #215
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Sounds like a good topic for learning, thanks for the info. See how much you actually have to learn outside of the supposed "all-knowing" school system?
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-28, 02:19   Link #216
Lord of Fire
The Voice of Reason
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Netherlands
Age: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by papermario13689 View Post
Sounds like a good topic for learning, thanks for the info. See how much you actually have to learn outside of the supposed "all-knowing" school system?
School is not 'all-knowing' by a long shot, especially because Astronomy is a science field that is subject to change whenever evidence arises that conflicts with what is known today, or when new discoveries are found.

For example, back in the day, people believed Venus was very much the same as Earth. Now we know it's a desolate world that is pretty much a giant pressure cooker, totally unsafe for living on. And what's even scarier, our own planet will face a similar fate in about a billion years from now, when the Sun will start getting brighter as it slowly nears the end of its life.
__________________
Lord of Fire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-28, 02:30   Link #217
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
Which is why I used the term "supposed". The way that a majority of teachers and especially principals/counselors act, they feel as if their words are absolute. We're students but everyone's got a different way of looking at things. Hard facts are one thing, but teachers teach what they're told to teach, so we can never be sure it's 100% accurate.

I always loved how Venus looked- on the outside it looked like a cloudy Earth. As you said, it's completely unsafe for living on though.
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-28, 02:31   Link #218
Ithekro
The Comet is Coming
 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Republic of California
Age: 37
Considering most of that stuff I learned from the old PBS show "Cosmos"....
__________________
Dessler Soto, Banzai!
Ithekro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-28, 02:34   Link #219
Hiroi Sekai
Minna no ojou-sama~♥
*Graphic Designer
 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Age: 23
Send a message via Skype™ to Hiroi Sekai
PBS was wonderful, the last thing I saw was Chris Botti's concert. I also remember seeing "Cosmos" as well.
__________________
Hiroi Sekai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2011-07-28, 02:34   Link #220
synaesthetic
blinded by blood
*Author
 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oakland, CA
Age: 30
Send a message via AIM to synaesthetic Send a message via Skype™ to synaesthetic
Just go on Youtube and search "Carl Sagan" and watch the clips from his old show.
__________________
synaesthetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:17.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
We use Silk.