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Old 2021-04-27, 06:18   Link #1281
Yu Ominae
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Key Board View Post
and it's such a bad timing that both the inactivated Jansen and Astra vaccines are in the middle of a blood clot panic

Any luck asking for more Sinovac surplus from China.

//
In the context of Duterte, there's more coming this month with Pfizer by April, if no fuckups are expected on the latter.

Moderna IIRC is by June.

Honestly, the Philippines has to be the only country where the private sector does a silent F.U. to the government by making the arrangements with the likes of Moderna and Astra. Same goes with local cities.
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Old 2021-04-28, 04:07   Link #1282
Yu Ominae
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I feel really bad that I'll likely get my vaccine shot through my father since he ordered Moderna IIRC for his company and the employees.

He snuck me and my brother there somehow. And I legitimately don't even work there... Sad that we citizens must pay. Which is why I'm really thinking of bailing out the first chance I get.
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Old 2021-05-05, 10:49   Link #1283
mangamuscle
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An empirical comment I forgot to make before. It might be due to the fact that hospitals in my city were for several months above the patient capacity they are used to, but we had an occupation rate of about 10% (meaning 90% of those infected with covid19 were in their homes), But now we that went up to 25%-30%! Not only that, but about 1/3 of those are intubated, up from 20% back in october/2020.

In other words, I fear slowly but surely, more deadly strains are becoming common, even though it has been said that over time is the less deadly strains are the ones that become common.
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Old 2021-05-06, 05:54   Link #1284
MeoTwister5
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Covid: US backs waiver on vaccine patents to boost supply
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Old 2021-05-07, 12:35   Link #1285
mangamuscle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeoTwister5 View Post
I am quite skeptical this will become a reality.
-----------------------------------------------------
I was cavilating about the spanish flu, people keep thinking about where it came from (China? USA?). But I think there is a more important part of the scenario. What if, said virus had been circulation all over the world for years, even decades and the start of the so called spanish flu was just a mutation that affected younger people?

I was thinking about this, because if coronavirus had hit a century ago, it would not have registered, since people with age over 60 were rare and if hey died people would simply say "old age caught to him".

Yep, I am thinking there could be an scenario where a covid19 mutation manages to cause higher mortality on younger people, so instead of having middle aged adults transmitting a deadly virus to the elderly, they could also be doing so to the younger generation.

Yep, I awakened very apocalyptical today, blame it to the news of a young mexican dub actor dying of covid19. He just recently dubbed Sukuna in Jujutsu Kaisen and dammit, he was 32, he was young enough for me to be his father.

https://translate.google.com/transla...a-del-covid-19

an example of his work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0VpyinsDDs
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Old 2021-05-07, 19:39   Link #1286
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you only need to look at India's hospitals to determine whether or not Covid19 was recent or not.
The fact that the news is leaking out despite Modi's attempts to plug it suggest that it's recent and urgent.

I don't think it's a mutation of influenza. There are considerable differences in the structure and replication methods. Influenza is negative strand replication. Covid19 is positive strand.

But yeah, there have been other diseases caused by corona viruses. Covid19 won't be the last

//
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Old 2021-05-08, 00:26   Link #1287
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This is what we call an extremely cynical point of view, and one I keep returning to again and again.

First, let me admit I haven't done my research into it, but the other intangible threat we face is climate change (and I have a terrible opinion on that one as well). The various effects of it... I often wonder how it compares to the late 1920's to the mid 1940's. The reason I ask and where this is going? Well, what events did we have during that time period? Of course, the two World Wars where millions died.

Post-war, parts of humanity enter a Golden Age- which is generally defined as (for some/those who write the history texts) life is prosperous, we've developed cures and vaccines for illnesses that have plagued humanity, and in general, we get a population boom-worldwide at that.

But... I have to wonder, was that a mistake? While I've heard various arguments both ways, I really do wonder if humanity has become overpopulated, and that Covid-19 is nature's way of reducing it. Not to mention, everyone pushes "Death is a bad thing and people should live as long as possible". Yet there's an old George Carlin bit about how people dying might actually be a good thing- to go the most extreme, has humanity become a cancer on Earth? On top of that, people are social creatures... and Covid-19 is destroying a lot of what makes society possible.

I like to think of that Dark Knight Joker meme- "Kill a ton of deer for population reduction, and no one blinks an eye. Kill a ton of humanity for population reduction, and everyone loses their minds."
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Old 2021-05-08, 14:54   Link #1288
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I'm against that unless you can laser target the ones that are actually responsible. USA and China are the biggest polluters. Must the rest of the world pay the same price?

To make things worse, corporations have gotten really good at shifting the blame. most of the ocean waste is done by companies like Coca Cola mismanaging their waste and getting away with it legally

Remember that plastic straw reduction campaign? That's just a feel good PR. It barely does a dent compared to what these companies are doing.

There's also the matter of techbros inventing new dumb ways to monetize nothing. You've probably heard about Crypto farms. You might have even felt the effect when you tried to purchase a new GPU. And these have already nullified our efforts to go green and save energy.

I think some people just don't care at all, and are perfectly fine with exploiting others and the environment.

Finally there is the political blame game. The ocean level is projected to rise and many people will be impacted. But who do you think the pro business politicians will blame?

So yeah, maybe a lot of people dying will take out some of these people in the process, but it's just unfair to everyone else. Just look at covid19. All the worst offenders like Bolsonaro, Trump and Boris Johnson all got Covid19. But how many of them actually died? They have better access to resources compared to their victims.



//
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Old 2021-05-08, 23:04   Link #1289
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And that's the argument I'm talking about. And there's a very simple counter.

Yes, a handful of extremely large corporations are apparently at fault for maybe 90% of the pollution. And I admit that human greed certainly plays a part in it. But I look at it like this: those companies aren't fully automatic yet; they still have human workers. Those workers vanish... well, maybe not kill production, but at least reduce it. Then you have the consumer side and the whole reason everything happens in the first place. If there aren't any consumers, there's no reason to make the product unless they're determined to waste money (which is a possibility). No product made because there aren't any consumers, no pollution made. So, reducing human population still works out. Yes, targeted reduction works better but... well, do we want to go into wars or not? At least if we were to enter more wars, that'd quickly reduce population.
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Old 2021-05-09, 01:43   Link #1290
Yu Ominae
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Looks like Biden's using the waiver as an opportunity to ensure no sensitive tech is taken by Beijing.

From Reuters.

Quote:
(Reuters) - The Biden administration is examining ways to ensure that a waiver of COVID-19 vaccine patents to aid poor countries will not hand sensitive U.S. biopharmaceutical technology to China and Russia, responding to a chorus of concerns, U.S. and industry officials say.

President Joe Biden on Wednesday backed the U.S. entering negotiations at the World Trade Organization for the waiver of intellectual property rights as a means to boost vaccine supplies by allowing poorer countries to make their own.

So far, vaccines have gone overwhelmingly to richer nations, which scooped up contracts for them earlier this year. [L1N2KP178] COVID-19 infection rates in wealthy countries have dropped as vaccination rates increased this year, but infections are still rising in 36 countries, with India's daily cases skyrocketing to nearly 400,000 a day.

Western pharmaceutical companies, many of which have received government support to develop vaccines, strongly oppose the transfer of intellectual property to make them. They say poorer countries will be slow to set up manufacturing capacity and compete for scarce supplies, hitting production.

Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer Inc, said https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/today...yeCAaSzA%3D%3D on Friday that the proposed waiver would disrupt progress made so far in boosting vaccine supplies. "It will unleash a scramble for the critical inputs we require in order to make a safe and effective vaccine. Entities with little or no experience in manufacturing vaccines are likely to chase the very raw materials we require to scale our production, putting the safety and security of all at risk."

Many companies and now some U.S. officials fear the move would allow China to leapfrog years of research and erode the U.S. advantage in biopharmaceuticals.

A senior Biden administration official said that while the priority is saving lives, the United States "would want to examine the effect of a waiver on China and Russia before it went into effect to ensure that it's fit for purpose."

A question and answer document produced by the administration and shared with industry representatives also acknowledges concerns that intellectual property sharing could damage the United State's competitive advantage over China, an industry source familiar with the discussions told Reuters.

The contents of the document read to a Reuters reporter by an industry representative said the Biden administration believes it can address those concerns through the WTO negotiations, but did not specify how. The source added that some agencies in the Biden administration have conflicting views of how to address the concerns in negotiations that are expected to take months.

Spokespersons at the White House and U.S. Trade Representative's office had no immediate comment on the matter.

Pfizer and Moderna spokespersons did not respond to requests for comment on technology transfer concerns, while a Novavax spokesperson referred Reuters to the company's statement https://ir.novavax.com/news-releases...o-trips-waiver opposing the waiver on Friday, which said proposals to "weaken intellectual property protections would not achieve equitable vaccine access."

Enforcing limits on use of the technology could be very difficult, once handed over, some analysts say. Messenger RNA, used in COVID-19 vaccines by leaders Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna, is a newly developed biotechnology that holds promise for treatments far beyond vaccines.

China and Russia have their own vaccines that do not use this biotechnology.

"It took Pfizer and Moderna years and years of research to develop these vaccines," said Gary Locke a former U.S. ambassador to China and U.S. Commerce Secretary. "China, Russia, India, South Africa and others want to gain access. Their intention is to get the underlying know-how so they can use it to develop further vaccines," Locke said.

China's Fosun Pharma has struck a deal with BioNTech on COVID-19 vaccine product development, which would potentially give it access to some of the technology.

China has high ambitions for its pharma industry and already is developing its own mRNA vaccine.

Patents themselves are publicly accessible, noted James Pooley, intellectual property attorney and former deputy director general of the United Nations' World Intellectual Property Organization. But trade secrets developed by Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna and others, "cook books" of manufacturing processes such as temperature and growing conditions, have not been made public. That may ultimately be a dual problem for negotiators. Before they protect the knowledge, U.S. officials would have to ensure access to it.

Those companies would need to be persuaded to come to the bargaining table to give up such trade secrets.

"What happens when it turns out that the U.S. can’t actually deliver the information that is critically important to implementing the inventions?" Pooley asked. "This will be seen as another failure by the U.S. and other rich countries to keep their promises."
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Old 2021-05-09, 06:21   Link #1291
Anh_Minh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magin View Post
And that's the argument I'm talking about. And there's a very simple counter.

Yes, a handful of extremely large corporations are apparently at fault for maybe 90% of the pollution. And I admit that human greed certainly plays a part in it. But I look at it like this: those companies aren't fully automatic yet; they still have human workers. Those workers vanish... well, maybe not kill production, but at least reduce it. Then you have the consumer side and the whole reason everything happens in the first place. If there aren't any consumers, there's no reason to make the product unless they're determined to waste money (which is a possibility). No product made because there aren't any consumers, no pollution made. So, reducing human population still works out. Yes, targeted reduction works better but... well, do we want to go into wars or not? At least if we were to enter more wars, that'd quickly reduce population.
Covid-19 isn't nearly lethal enough to matter in the long run, pollution-wise.
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Old 2021-05-09, 07:47   Link #1292
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This is the other issue with Covid-19. We just don't know enough about it.

I agree that it isn't as lethal as everyone would suggest- despite the recent outbreak in India with a huge number... everyone forgets that India A) is a literal sub-continent B) therefore, along with China, also has over a billion people for population (I think- I'm too lazy to look up exact numbers, but I know India's population is HUGE)

Where I do agree with everyone is that it at least causes you to be insanely ill, and I hate even so much as having a normal cold. I said it at the beginning of of all, and I'll stick with it: the reason why the state of the world has become what it has is because this virus is easily transmissible, and while we now have a vaccine... we have no other proven medicines against it. In fact, I'm going to have to look at the numbers for the death toll again- it's an easy news story when you only focus on the deaths and not survivors.
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Old 2021-05-09, 13:13   Link #1293
kari-no-sugata II
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magin View Post
This is what we call an extremely cynical point of view, and one I keep returning to again and again.

First, let me admit I haven't done my research into it, but the other intangible threat we face is climate change (and I have a terrible opinion on that one as well). The various effects of it... I often wonder how it compares to the late 1920's to the mid 1940's. The reason I ask and where this is going? Well, what events did we have during that time period? Of course, the two World Wars where millions died.

Post-war, parts of humanity enter a Golden Age- which is generally defined as (for some/those who write the history texts) life is prosperous, we've developed cures and vaccines for illnesses that have plagued humanity, and in general, we get a population boom-worldwide at that.

But... I have to wonder, was that a mistake? While I've heard various arguments both ways, I really do wonder if humanity has become overpopulated, and that Covid-19 is nature's way of reducing it. Not to mention, everyone pushes "Death is a bad thing and people should live as long as possible". Yet there's an old George Carlin bit about how people dying might actually be a good thing- to go the most extreme, has humanity become a cancer on Earth? On top of that, people are social creatures... and Covid-19 is destroying a lot of what makes society possible.

I like to think of that Dark Knight Joker meme- "Kill a ton of deer for population reduction, and no one blinks an eye. Kill a ton of humanity for population reduction, and everyone loses their minds."
A lot to unpack here...

For the current pandemic, I think it's fair to say that it caught a lot of the world off-guard and unprepared, on multiple levels, particularly the Western world. Just to take a recent example, I think a lot of smart people in government took the wrong attitude when reports came out of blood clots being a possible extremely rare side-effect - in normal times, taking a "do no harm, safety first" approach would be fine but during a pandemic that can be literally fatal. Putting it another way, almost certainly more people will die due to reduced vaccine take-up than would have happened otherwise. Multiple countries got this wrong, I would say.

For sure there will be multiple long term changes as a side-effect of this pandemic. However, the pandemic itself for the most part should be overly relatively quickly.

Relative to the risks of climate change at least. I think one problem with the current human induced global warming is just how much of it is basically "momentum" (thermal inertia). Think of this, say you're in the northern hemisphere - the hottest day of the year doesn't come in midsummer (June 21st) but generally 1-2 months later. Why, despite the amount of energy being received from the sun being weaker? Momentum / thermal inertia. It takes time for winter ice to melt, for the land and oceans to warm up, etc. A similar effect occurs for overall global warming, except it's not seasonal.

Putting it another way, the current global temperatures are only minimally affected by emissions from the last 10-20 years. If we could wave a magic wand and cut all "greenhouse gas" emissions to zero instantly, the effect on the global climate would be tiny for quite some time. This makes it very easy to kick the can down the road - why should today's politicians take the pain for tomorrow's politicians?

btw, regarding the population size in general, I wouldn't say it's the pure count that's the problem. It's the total consumption - particularly of unsustainable fossil fuels. I think that the Earth could sustain a global population of 20Bn or more long term, but only if it shifts to sustainable sources of energy. Once nearly all energy comes from sustainable sources then you simply need to maintain the current infrastructure as is, assuming a stable population size.
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Old 2021-05-09, 14:37   Link #1294
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Population problems and the like have been one of the driving factors of fiction writers to suggest other forms or living. Be that ocean colonization. Mechanical beings. Space colonization (orbital habitats). Planetary colonization (Mars in primary target for most). Or any host of other concepts that are not just living on the land we currently have, or making use of more than what we have currently available with our present technology.
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Old 2021-05-10, 09:10   Link #1295
kari-no-sugata II
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^ I'm not expecting population pressure to force us into space or another planets any time soon. It's difficult to imagine how overcrowded Earth would have to be for it to make economic sense.

Anyway... more on topic. I was wondering how people across various countries feel about when things will return to normal locally... or if they already have.

UK: feels like nationally things will be relatively normal by summer (July/August). Quite amazing considering how bleak things felt at Christmas. I'm still expecting various restrictions and inconveniences for international travel though.
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Old 2021-05-10, 15:08   Link #1296
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Saagar Enjeti: New Details REVEAL Fauci, Media Coverup Of Lab Leak Hypothesis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Pk0wLN5uuU
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Old 2021-05-11, 16:42   Link #1297
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He’s the token conservative commentator. What did you expect.

//
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Old 2021-05-11, 20:05   Link #1298
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He’s the token conservative commentator. What did you expect.

//
That by itself don't make what he said right or wrong.
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Old 2021-05-11, 20:49   Link #1299
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No, the fact that it's complete nonsense makes it wrong.
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Old 2021-05-11, 21:10   Link #1300
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What do we expect? Facts, substance, accuracy? Take your pick.
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