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Old 2018-05-06, 22:45   Link #3641
TinyRedLeaf
Feeling comfy
 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 43
Japan struggling to cope with tourism boom
Quote:
A downside has emerged — something the media is calling "kankō kōgai", or "tourism pollution". [But] rude foreign tourists are a common media topic whose anecdotal coverage makes it impossible to quantify. [Still], a comment by comedian Takeshi Kitano has made a big impression: He said Japan has sacrificed its cultural integrity for the sake of money, thus implying that foreign tourism is polluting the Japanese spirit.

Given that the largest portion of overseas tourists came from mainland China in 2017 and more than 80 per cent of Japanese people hold an unfavourable opinion of the country, it would follow that, at best, the Japanese public only tolerates the foreign tourist boom.

THE JAPAN TIMES
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Old 2018-05-27, 10:03   Link #3642
SeijiSensei
AS Oji-kun
 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Forests of Hokkaido
Age: 68
Statistics on the tourism boom (article cited today by Fareed Zakaria on CNN)

https://qz.com/1283090/going-to-japa...dented-levels/

Quote:
From 1995 to 2012, the annual number of tourists going to Japan increased from 3.3 million to 8.4 million, a growth rate of about 6% each year.

And then, the deluge.

In its most recent report, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) estimates that about 28.7 million tourists visited Japan in 2017. This increase, a change of more than 20 million over just five years, is the largest ever recorded by the organization, which keeps statistics going back to 1995.

It is likely the largest increase in tourists, in absolute numbers, a country has ever seen.
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Old 2018-06-03, 04:59   Link #3643
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Age: 43
Why are marriages in decline in East Asia?
Quote:
Hong Kong (June 3, 2018): Declining marriage rates are being seen around the world, but it is perhaps in the ageing societies of Asia that the growing number of singletons is worrying parents — and governments — the most.

While parallels of fewer marriages and plunging birth rates can be found in all East Asian societies, the broad trends almost always started in Japan.

It is not for the lack of trying. Studies suggest that many Japanese singletons still want to get married. When Japan experienced rapid economic growth in the 80s and 90s, men were a lot more enthusiastic about courting women. However, two decades of economic stagnation changed the game for young men.

CHANNEL NEWSASIA
The usual socio-economic reasons were cited. But a few points were new and surprising to me:
1) When Asians don't marry, they tend not to have children. In Britain, close to 50 per cent of new babies are now born out of wedlock. The figure is just 2.3 per cent in Japan, 1.9 per cent in Korea.

2) 51 per cent of single mothers in Japan live in poverty, and one in seven says she cannot afford basic necessities like food at least from time to time. The policy of requiring single mothers to work befuddles experts. The rate of poverty doesn't change very much even when the mothers are working, because of the weak position women occupy in the labour market.

3) Starting in the 90s, commercial marriage brokers took single Korean men to Vietnam to look for a spouse. For Korea though, it was an affront to the country's identity. The idea that being pure-blooded Korean is superior still lingers, and often means children of mixed heritage become targets of bullies.


On point (1), I'd say it's not as though single East Asian men and women aren't indulging in casual sex. They're no different from people in other urbanised and industrialised countries. But I'm amazed that so many more children are born out of wedlock in Britain, which either means contraceptives are being used more regularly in comparable East Asian countries (I doubt that), or that the rate of casual sex in East Asia is dramatically lower than I'd imagine.

On point (2), this passage on a single Japanese mother reminded me of Hana of Wolf Children:
Quote:
Masami Onishi, 24, works nine hours a day, six days a week to make US$800 a month. Having a full-time job is also a prerequisite for her to receive some government welfare. Though never married, she wears a wedding ring. "When I didn't wear the ring, strangers would come up and tell my girls that they had no father. It hurt them badly," she said.
And on point (3), well, today I learnt it's not just the Japanese who are hung up over their "pure race" mentality.
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Old 2018-06-03, 06:20   Link #3644
Dextro
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Join Date: Feb 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRedLeaf View Post
On point (1), I'd say it's not as though single East Asian men and women aren't indulging in casual sex. They're no different from people in other urbanised and industrialised countries. But I'm amazed that so many more children are born out of wedlock in Britain, which either means contraceptives are being used more regularly in comparable East Asian countries (I doubt that), or that the rate of casual sex in East Asia is dramatically lower than I'd imagine.
You miss one very big point. In western societies it has become completely acceptable for a couple to live together and raise a child without ever getting married. For effects of this statistic then those children would be born out of wedlock but not out of a conventional family. It also seems that, thanks in part to the poor economic state of modern young adults in general but also to growing disinterest, more and more people are forgoing officially tying the knot (in the west at least).

For asian societies on the other hand, you get your answer to this right on the article you linked:

Quote:
Yet nothing seems to help. Marriage rates continue to slump across East Asia. It’s a pressing issue because in Confucian societies, no marriage often means no children, which could threaten a country's economic prospects and, arguably, its survival.
If most of your society views it as a moral mandate to not have children out of wedlock and if time, economics and other societal factors keep prevent people from getting married then you get plummeting birthrate. The only way you fix that is either by changing the accepted viewpoint to not having children being ok out of wedlock or to have an economic boom like in the 80s where people can just thrown themselves with reckless abandon into big life decisions
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Old 2018-06-12, 08:17   Link #3645
TwilightsCall
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Age: 27
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I'm curious about the case of this Japanese single mother. If the numbers cited there are accurate, that means she is being paid less than half of the minimum wage. I have to assume that there's something else going on in that situation, otherwise...I don't know, it's just a baffling scenario to deal with.

Not that in her case bumping her to the minimum wage would solve the problem. I could certainly make do where I am now on $1600 a month by myself, but with two kids? That might be pushing it a little. I could see that plus government assistance being manageable though, if not particularly luxurious.
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Old 2018-06-14, 18:14   Link #3646
SeijiSensei
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Forests of Hokkaido
Age: 68
Koshien never looked like this!

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Old 2018-06-14, 20:41   Link #3647
Toukairin
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Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: A city with a small mountain in the middle


Wrestling is all about lots of theatrics in Japan, even a lot more than in North America. I really enjoyed that video.
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Old 2018-06-14, 22:35   Link #3648
AnimeFan188
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Prize-Winning ‘Shoplifters’: Japan’s PM Hates
This Movie Because It’s Just Too True:


"Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda won the Palme d'Or at Cannes for "Shoplifters,”
a critically acclaimed family drama about a poverty-stricken quasi-family that
manages to eke out a living via petty larceny and fraud. The film is now playing
widely in Japan, but there were moments when it looked like it wouldn’t. Japanese
film distributors often shun anything with political connotations, and the government
here just hates this movie.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been working for years to promote “Cool Japan” and
anything Japanese or anyone Japanese, that does well. Everyone expected the
director would at least get a congratulatory call from the ever-opportunistic Abe.
Instead, Kore-eda has been more or less snubbed by the prime minister and reviled
by Abe’s cronies and ideological allies.

What is it about this heart-warming film that gets the cold shoulder from the ruling
class?"

See:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/prize-...-true?ref=home
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Old 2018-06-19, 12:42   Link #3649
SeijiSensei
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Forests of Hokkaido
Age: 68
Japan hands Colombia a loss at the World Cup

Quote:
Scoring multiple goals for only the fourth time in 18 World Cup matches, Japan stunned Colombia, one of the darlings from the 2014 World Cup, with a 2-1 victory in their Group H match Tuesday in Saransk. The win was the first for an Asian team against a South American team in 18 World Cup meetings.
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Old Today, 09:12   Link #3650
TinyRedLeaf
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Age: 43
Also at the World Cup:
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Quote:
After their team swept Colombia off the pitch, Japanese fans also did their share of sweeping: meticulously cleaning up their rows and seats in the stadium.

Equipped with large rubbish bags they brought along, the fans marched through the rows picking up rubbish, to leave the place just as neat as they had found it.

"Cleaning up after football matches is an extension of basic behaviours that are taught in school, where the children clean their school classrooms and hallways," explains Scott North, professor of sociology at Osaka University.

"With constant reminders throughout childhood, these behaviours become habits for much of the population."
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