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Old 2017-05-16, 16:53   Link #3601
SeijiSensei
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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The age of consent in Japan varies across the country. Local regulations can increase the age; this source suggests that the effective age of consent in Tokyo is 18.

Frankly I don't care what the law says. Few if any thirteen-year-olds have the mental and emotional capacity to give consent, particularly while being pressured by an older man.

I assume you'd agree that receiving compensation for sex acts constitutes prostitution.
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Old 2017-05-16, 17:27   Link #3602
erneiz_hyde
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Ah I see, I didn't read that far down, my bad.
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Old 2017-05-17, 03:47   Link #3603
Verso Sciolto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erneiz_hyde View Post
Ah I see, I didn't read that far down, my bad.
From Anna Fifield's WP article:
Quote:
“Many people see it as a problem with the girls, not with the men.” [...] As such, when authorities discuss ways to curb the practice, they tend to come up with ideas such as imposing curfews on girls, rather than penalizing men for having sex with high-schoolers, Muta said.
In that regard, to illustrate the backward mentality among police and lawmakers, "Schoolgirls, Money and Rebellion in Japan", Sharon Kinsella's 2013 book on this subject remains pertinent.
Quote:
[…]conservative members of the Diet and the police believed that what was required was not law to punish adult men for having paid dates with minors, but stronger punishment for juvenile delinquents. In October 1997, the LDP organized a committee for the revision of the Shōnen Hō (New Youth Bill) aimed at countering the focus of the Child Solicitation Law on “adult responsibility.” In 2000, the Diet passed the New Youth Law, stipulating that juvenile offenders between the ages of 14 and 20 would now be sent to criminal court rather than family court, effectively lowering the age of criminal liability from 16 to 14 years old. The revised New Youth Law represented the inclination of Police and conservative politicians towards the stricter control and punishment of youth misdemeanors and voluntary prostitution for teenage girls in evidence over the preceding 40 years. In 2007 the Youth Law was updated again, the time pushing the age of criminal liability further downward, so that children aged 11 to 18 years old could be treated as legal agents responsible for their actions.
On the same page Kinsella briefly addresses and ends her summary on the "Internet Introduction Site Act" with this line:
Quote:
"While legislation originally sought to criminalize male customers rather than schoolgirls, the NPA and LDP politicians worked to rapidly overturn this legal position, with further legislation clearly identifying young women as guilty parties in their own purchase.
Page 36.

[National Police Agency and Liberal Democratic Party]
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Old 2017-05-18, 09:46   Link #3604
MrTerrorist
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Princess Mako to lose Japan royal status by marrying commoner

Interesting. Can the Princesses regain their titles should something happen to the male heirs?
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Old 2017-05-18, 23:19   Link #3605
Toukairin
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That is absolutely ridiculous if you ask me. And besides, there are not that many noble families left in Japan.
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Old 2017-05-28, 08:38   Link #3606
SeijiSensei
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The Struggles of Japanese Single Mothers

Quote:
The judgment and stigma that single mothers face in many countries are taken to another level in Japan, a homogeneous society where those who do not conform often try to hide their situations — even from their friends and wider family.

But Japan also has a culture that makes it difficult for women to work after having children — changing this is a key part of Abe’s solution to the country’s economic problems — and that makes life exponentially harder for single mothers.

“We have this culture of shame,” Tokumaru said. “Women’s position is still so much lower than men’s in this country, and that affects how we are treated. Women tend to have irregular jobs, so they need several jobs to make ends meet.”

[T]he number of families living on an income lower than the public welfare assistance level more than doubled in the 20 years after the asset price bubble popped in 1992, according to a study by Kensaku Tomuro of Yamagata University.

Now 16 percent of Japanese children live below the poverty line, according to Health Ministry statistics, but among single-parent families, the rate hits 55 percent. Poverty rates in Osaka are among the worst.
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Old 2017-05-29, 12:34   Link #3607
SeijiSensei
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Japanese Driver Wins Indy 500

Perhaps the most iconic auto race held in America is the Indianapolis 500 which takes place on the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend. Unlike Formula One racing (e.g, the Grand Prix of Monaco), the Indy 500 takes place on an oval track.

Quote:
Takuma Sato, a journeyman driver, became the first Japanese winner of the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday when he held off the three-time champion Helio Castroneves in a 230-mile-per-hour wheel-rubbing duel to the finish.

Sato, 40, a failed Formula One driver who had just one previous victory in 123 IndyCar starts, is perhaps best remembered for spinning out of the 2012 Indy 500 on the final lap while challenging the eventual winner Dario Franchitti for the lead.
Already his victory has fueled some racist tweeting, in this case by a Denver sports writer.

“Nothing specifically personal, but I am very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend,” wrote Terry Frei, of the Denver Post.

It's been 72 years since the end of World War II. I guess Mr. Frei didn't notice.

BTW, Japan's best-known female golfer, Miyazato Ai, once number one in the world, has announced her retirement. "Japan's Ai Miyazato says she has decided to quit the LPGA Tour at the end of the season because she lost her motivation for the sport after years of struggling to win again."

Most golfers don't retire at 31, but having watched Miyazato's struggles over the past couple of years, it seems like a good decision.
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Old 2017-05-30, 11:33   Link #3608
SeijiSensei
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As a follow-up to the story above, the Denver Post fired the writer who found Sato's victory "uncomfortable."

Quote:
Denver Post publisher Mac Tully and editor Lee Ann Colacioppo apologized Monday for a “disrespectful and unacceptable tweet” as they announced that Frei is no longer an employee of the newspaper because of the social media comment that sparked intense backlash.

“We apologize for the disrespectful and unacceptable tweet that was sent by one of our reporters,” the statement reads. “Terry Frei is no longer an employee of The Denver Post. It’s our policy not to comment further on personnel issues. The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor what we stand for. We hope you will accept our profound apologies.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ndy-500-tweet/
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Old 2017-07-28, 18:04   Link #3609
judasmartel
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I am not sure if this is the right thread for this, but I am very curious about why Japan is so strong in women's team sports yet are only mid-tier at best in men's team sports.

For example, Japan has already won the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2011 and made it back to the 2015 final, and they are also powerhouses in women's volleyball and basketball.

In contrast, Japanese men's sports teams struggle to get the same success their female counterparts have been achieving in the world stage. Sure, they are also powerhouses in Asian men's football, volleyball, and basketball, but are only mid-tier at best at the world level.

How come Japan is so strong in women's sports but not so much in men's sports, yet the most popular sports anime these days feature men's sports? I mean, KnB has players with superpowers, yet Japanese men's basketball in real life is not exactly at top tier even in Asia.

In all fairness, Japanese male athletes fare better in individual sports. Japanese figure skaters are among the best in the world (the current Olympic champion being Yuzuru Hanyu), and they also have the real life Prince of Tennis, Kei Nishikori.
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Old 2017-07-29, 14:08   Link #3610
RichardFromMarple
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I've noticed in gymnastics Japan has a very good record for men, especially in the Olympics, but not so well in the women's.
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Old 2017-07-30, 03:13   Link #3611
judasmartel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardFromMarple View Post
I've noticed in gymnastics Japan has a very good record for men, especially in the Olympics, but not so well in the women's.
Like I said, Japanese men fare better in individual sports than the women, but it seems to be the other way around for team sports.
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Old 2017-07-30, 03:16   Link #3612
judasmartel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardFromMarple View Post
I've noticed in gymnastics Japan has a very good record for men, especially in the Olympics, but not so well in the women's.
Like I said, Japanese men fare better in individual sports than the women, but it seems to be the other way around for team sports.

As for women's gymnastics, when you have the US, China, and Russia dominating the event...
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Old 2017-08-02, 16:01   Link #3613
Toukairin
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Sometimes, I have a strange impression that male sports teams ask their players to follow a certain mould. It can be seen with the national football team, and it looks even worse when the mould is ill adapted for competing against the best. However, I strongly believe things could greatly change in some disciplines if there is a new program that pushes for better athleticism at younger ages among those who play team sports.
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Old 2017-08-08, 19:08   Link #3614
Blueknight78
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i don't know if thi already was posted before, too much pages to check but i found that youtube channel very good to help know more about japanese culture and some of they issues:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcI...RO5qY5f9buahCQ

the channel is more about "socialization, but due to that you can get issues info about low birth rates, about herb males and others stuffs, while the guy is japanese himself, the channel is for "western peoples", could not be the perfect realiable source but you get a lot of "what is happening" inside of many japaneses heads.
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Old 2017-10-06, 07:38   Link #3615
SeijiSensei
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Dead at 31 from overwork

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...self-to-death/

Quote:
A young journalist's grueling work schedule — including a single month with 159 hours of overtime and just two days off — triggered the heart failure that killed her at age 31, Japanese labor regulators ruled.

Authorities officially attributed Miwa Sado's death to “karoshi” — the Japanese word for a death due to overwork — according to information released this week by NHK, the public broadcaster that employed her.
It's bad enough that private employers work their staffs to death, but it's pretty shocking when it's happening in public agencies like the NHK which you'd think to be more heavily regulated. Imagine if someone worked herself to death at PBS. You'd have Congressional investigations.


Yes, you can buy a gun in Japan, but it's not easy

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...305_story.html

Quote:
While lengthy and complex by U.S. standards, the entirety of the process Saki and Tak went through is designed to manage the risks inherent in firearms. There is no question that Japan’s approach places a burden on those who wish to bear arms, but it also limits the ability of someone who is dangerous to get a gun. It’s hard to argue with the results: In 2015, there were more than 13,000 non-suicide gun deaths in the United States; in Japan, there was only one.
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