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Old 2011-01-28, 18:46   Link #1
Jjo
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Join Date: Dec 2008
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Do you think college is worth it?

I was just wondering this today as I paid OVER $200 to RENT ..not buy, rent; books I would need for classes.

It's kinda insane to me, when I add up what I spend to rent books throughout the year it's close to what I pay for my rent lol. I feel like I am being ripped off honestly.

So anyways; do you guys think college is worth it/for everyone?
I mean I know if you want to make more money you should get a degree and such, but education wise do you feel it made a difference? I feel like my math class is pretty worthless - but the others I actually learn stuff in.
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Old 2011-01-28, 18:52   Link #2
Samari
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Sure. If you want money. Or an easier time getting it legally.
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Old 2011-01-28, 19:51   Link #3
Vexx
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First question is why do you want the degree? If it is to improve your marketability in the job market - the next question is "what are you majoring in and does it have value in the market".

The very first sort Human Resources does in their candidate search is to sort by "has degree vs does not have degree". Any management position requires a degree. Any professional position requires a degree.

Now if you want to be a craftsman or technician... you might look at certification in technical classes or community college.

You have to ask, "how much do I want to make to enjoy life?" and then reverse-engineer to what jobs and professions support that.
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Old 2011-01-28, 21:51   Link #4
NoemiChan
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Yeah of course!

Higher Educational Attainment equals Higher Pay Expectations when you graduate then gain experience after which you apply....

I understood you dude... and as for advice.... rely on the books readily available like in the library and plus do more of searching in the Internet, for references. Proud to say, I didn't waste a single cents for books, because photocopying is lega hehehel, and do some notes as well...

If want to have a good future you need to invest, more of the tuition. (Unless your uniquely gifted;I believe talents are more of God given than, learned)

And learn to enjoy college, in a serious but fun way... hehehe
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Old 2011-01-28, 22:39   Link #5
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No its a waste of time and money and all you do at college is drink and get arrested. All they teach you is the same stuff you all ready know and to keep you mind closed. Then when you get out of this all that is waiting for you is a job at burger king to start paying of you college loans. Just because you get a better degree it dosnt all ways mean a better job.

Best part is spring break
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Old 2011-01-28, 22:45   Link #6
Simon
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Like Vexx said, it depends what you want out of it.

If you're after a piece of paper that will help you get a job, honest recruiters will tell you that a degree alone means next to nothing: basically all it tells an employer is that for 3-4 years you managed to fill in the enrolment forms correctly, drag your butt out of bed for morning lectures, and hand in assignments more or less on time.

However, not having a degree means a lot when you're job-hunting. It will seriously limit what you can apply for. Depending on your interests this may or may not matter - for example, when I lived in Australia diesel mechanics and truck drivers working in the mines were getting more money than I was in a senior IT job. If it's purely about earning potential, don't discount more practical qualifications (unless you're like me and have no practical skills, that is).

That's not the only reason to study though. Believe it or not, University can be a great place to learn stuff if you're willing to go beyond what's required to pass the course. And while you can't put a dollar value on it, some would say that's worthwhile in itself. Rent doesn't pay itself, but there's more to life than being a worker-bee.
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Old 2011-01-28, 23:01   Link #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
First question is why do you want the degree? If it is to improve your marketability in the job market - the next question is "what are you majoring in and does it have value in the market".

The very first sort Human Resources does in their candidate search is to sort by "has degree vs does not have degree". Any management position requires a degree. Any professional position requires a degree.

Now if you want to be a craftsman or technician... you might look at certification in technical classes or community college.

You have to ask, "how much do I want to make to enjoy life?" and then reverse-engineer to what jobs and professions support that.
I think this is good advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon View Post
...That's not the only reason to study though. Believe it or not, University can be a great place to learn stuff if you're willing to go beyond what's required to pass the course. And while you can't put a dollar value on it, some would say that's worthwhile in itself. Rent doesn't pay itself, but there's more to life than being a worker-bee.
Continuing a little on what Simon mentions here....

Traditionally university education was not only to refine a specialization but also to broaden one's horizon on many levels. In recent decades the latter aspect has been decidedly under-emphasized and specialization has taken the primary place (at least as far as I can tell).

I guess college could indeed be very much worth it if you have clear ideas in mind of what you want exactly it is you want to do.

If not then perhaps (and only perhaps) some "life experience" for a while working, traveling, or similar things may be in order for you to make things a little clearer? I know several people who have done precisely this and it seems to have worked out well for them.
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Old 2011-01-28, 23:11   Link #8
RadiantBeam
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I say it's worth it. Everyone else above me has already commented on the educational aspect of it, but IMO it's also worth it to go to college because usually, it gives you a wider range of people to interact with than you had in high school. It gives you a better chance of socializing with people and learning how to network and make connections, and personally, I think that's just as important to know as getting a degree.
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Old 2011-01-28, 23:21   Link #9
Tri-ring
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I really do not think this qualifies as an answer but with the fast track pace of the internet, on premise university and college may become much less important like brick and mortar stores.
The reason why Uni and/or higher level of education had screening test were because they had limited space for students to attend. Now with the power of the internet anybody and everybody can attend any and all class if they for wish please(as long as teachers are willing to teach).
It's similar to the recording business, why did high ranking prestigious Uni have reknown teachers?
Because there was a prestige in teaching at those schools luring in more highly potential students and schools can cash in hiking up tuition luring more renown teachers paying better salary creating a vicious cycle.

Twenty~fifty years from now I predict that brick and mortar Uni and colleges are saved for students that are really interested in quest for knowledge and the less motivated people will take on-line classes and the only thing that matters are grades from tests. There will definitely be a struggle of survival amongst schools around the world since on-line class does not have limit in physical space for students merely server capacity.

Anybody can attend as long as they pay their "tuition" but not everybody will graduate in the bold new era.
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Old 2011-01-28, 23:33   Link #10
Vexx
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One thing I didn't mention was the cost/benefit analysis can be subtle. If you get a biomechanical engineering degree at Enormous State U. and have a debt of $200K when you graduate.... and there's no jobs because Corporate Gods moved all the action overseas... you'd better be willing to immigrate because you can't just declare bankruptcy thanks to corporate lobbying that "reformed" personal bankruptcy laws.
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Old 2011-01-29, 01:05   Link #11
Xion Valkyrie
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It depends on what kind of degree you have and where you go, as well as your grades.

Ivy League/top 20 schools: Even a liberal arts degree here would get your foot through the door for interviews at the biggest firms.

Engineering Schools: Engineering degrees here would be extremely useful for engineering related jobs. The better the school, the easier it is for you to get a call back. Software giants like Google will go to like Berkeley or Stanford to collect resumes and schedule on campus interviews. Even if the school isn't that highly ranked, engineering degrees are still very useful in getting your resume noticed.

Liberal arts/traditional science degrees are generally not that helpful in the current job market unless you have a brand name school attached to it. A trade or technical school would be far more useful in terms of getting a job.
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Old 2011-01-29, 02:50   Link #12
SaintessHeart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
First question is why do you want the degree? If it is to improve your marketability in the job market - the next question is "what are you majoring in and does it have value in the market".

The very first sort Human Resources does in their candidate search is to sort by "has degree vs does not have degree". Any management position requires a degree. Any professional position requires a degree.

Now if you want to be a craftsman or technician... you might look at certification in technical classes or community college.

You have to ask, "how much do I want to make to enjoy life?" and then reverse-engineer to what jobs and professions support that.
Brilliant advice. But if you are in SEA, this doesn't exactly apply.

Screw academic meritocracy.
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Old 2011-01-29, 02:55   Link #13
Kusa-San
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Originally Posted by Jjo View Post
I was just wondering this today as I paid OVER $200 to RENT ..not buy, rent; books I would need for classes.
I only paid 25 euro for an english book and 6 euro for a duplicated note. I('m glad to be in France
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Old 2011-01-29, 03:14   Link #14
Jjo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexx View Post
First question is why do you want the degree? If it is to improve your marketability in the job market - the next question is "what are you majoring in and does it have value in the market".

The very first sort Human Resources does in their candidate search is to sort by "has degree vs does not have degree". Any management position requires a degree. Any professional position requires a degree.

Now if you want to be a craftsman or technician... you might look at certification in technical classes or community college.

You have to ask, "how much do I want to make to enjoy life?" and then reverse-engineer to what jobs and professions support that.
These are all great questions..>_<
I think I am just being emo over having to spend that much for books xD lol the school I am in now is the best for my major.

And of course I want the degree so I can work in the field (it's required for my field really) >_<

It's just hard coming off of vacation this week and going back to classes I guess lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kusa-San View Post
I only paid 25 euro for an english book and 6 euro for a duplicated note. I('m glad to be in France

what?? >_<
Ughh I have no idea why it's so expensive to rent these books...I would never be able to afford them on my own if I didn't have a roommate ;_;

The expense of school in the US almost makes me want to go to college in Korea. I have no idea what the cost is like there though..
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Old 2011-01-29, 03:41   Link #15
SaintessHeart
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Originally Posted by Jjo View Post
<snip>
Wait. What do you want to major in?

You might want to share with us the subject AND the college you are planning to go, otherwise you'd just be blowing money for the educators to swim in.
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Most of all, you have to be disciplined and you have to save, even if you hate our current financial system. Because if you don't save, then you're guaranteed to end up with nothing.
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Old 2011-01-29, 03:48   Link #16
Jjo
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Originally Posted by SaintessHeart View Post
Wait. What do you want to major in?

You might want to share with us the subject AND the college you are planning to go, otherwise you'd just be blowing money for the educators to swim in.
I am already a few years into school^^;

My major is biomedical engineering and I am studying at MIT ;_; I would have alot of trouble explaining to my parents if I just left school and picked another school/major..

Hopefully I don't wake up one day and just decide to never work in that field lol ._.
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Old 2011-01-29, 04:05   Link #17
MeoTwister5
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Jeebus cripes MIT! You've already got the advantage of school status already; being an MIT graduate will immediately raise eyebrows and get potential employers to take notice.

Biomedical engineering is going to be a big thing with the recent shifts away from traditional internal medicine towards genetics and nanotech medicine. When that goes into full gear Big Pharma will start looking for people who are into high tech biomed research rather than traditional clinicians like me. If biomedical research is your thing then I advise you to take it, and try to get an PhD while you're at it. There's a lot of future in the biotech field.

Of course you COULD use that as your premed and enter Medicine...
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Old 2011-01-29, 04:26   Link #18
Samari
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Originally Posted by RadiantBeam View Post
I say it's worth it. Everyone else above me has already commented on the educational aspect of it, but IMO it's also worth it to go to college because usually, it gives you a wider range of people to interact with than you had in high school. It gives you a better chance of socializing with people and learning how to network and make connections, and personally, I think that's just as important to know as getting a degree.
That's a good point. And if one goes to college and has the opportunity to be in the college atmosphere, it's worth it. Obviously affording college is the primary concern, but if you can afford it, or feel confident that you'll be able to pay off your student loans, then you also get the benefit of the young college-life experience. Depends who you are and where you want to go, but for me, I love the college atmosphere at my school. And it's not even an enclosed school with it's own campus. Regardless, there is a sense of belonging and the comradery is apparent. I didn't get this feeling until I moved by the campus and thus my interaction with others rose. The pretty girls make it worth it too.
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Old 2011-01-29, 04:48   Link #19
Reckoner
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As a college student, majoring in math, I can whole heartedly say that the college experience is a worthless piece of trash.

You go to college for a piece of paper called a degree that helps you find better jobs (And sometimes it doesn't even do that) and then you really begin life. That's the only reason to go to college.
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Old 2011-01-29, 04:55   Link #20
Samari
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Originally Posted by Reckoner View Post
As a college student, majoring in math, I can whole heartedly say that the college experience is a worthless piece of trash.

You go to college for a piece of paper called a degree that helps you find better jobs (And sometimes it doesn't even do that) and then you really begin life. That's the only reason to go to college.
Well every college is different. Especially if we're talking international institutions (if you are planning to study overseas). Honestly I think it's what you make of it. It's not for everyone. Some aren't livid socialites. Not saying I am, but I've had my fair share of socializing like most folks. And I've had a lot of good experiences I'll never forget.
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