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Old 2020-09-15, 11:15   Link #1
Stark700
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Requiem of the Rose King



Manga series 'Requiem of the Rose King' is getting a TV anime adaptation. Release date is unknown at the time.

Announcement trailer



Plot Summary from Viz's website

Quote:
Having taken care of Hastings’s interference, Richard and his allies consolidate power. Meanwhile, King Edward V’s coronation day is decided. For entertainment, a hunt is arranged, but behind the scenes the king and the royal princes have concocted a dastardly plot!
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Old 2020-09-16, 10:24   Link #2
zztop
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Originally Posted by Guardian Enzo View Post
Never heard of it, but at least it's not a cookie-cutter isekai or cute girls show. That alone makes it interesting in the current climate.
Apparently Rose King's a shoujo-themed loose adaptation of "Shakespearean plays Richard III and Henry VI, Part 3 (and) follows the character of Richard III during the tumultuous Wars of the Roses (1455–1487) period in English history."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_of_the_Rose_King


The mangaka for Rose King, Kanno Aya, was quite well-known for her previous manga series Otomen.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otomen

Oddly enough Otomen never got an anime, but it did get a live-action drama in 2009.
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Old 2021-03-23, 04:55   Link #3
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Visual



Staff

Quote:
Kentarō Suzuki (Angels of Death, Kud Wafter) is directing the anime at J.C. Staff, and Hiroki Uchida (Days of Urashimasakatasen, Gamers!, Merc Storia: The Apathetic Boy and the Girl in a Bottle) is supervising and writing the series scripts. Tsutomu Hashizume is designing the characters.
https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/new...visual/.170974
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Old 2021-07-01, 22:11   Link #4
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Delayed to January (Winter 2022)

https://twitter.com/baraou_anime/sta...95575197376516
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Old 2021-10-03, 22:06   Link #5
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PV (2 cour confirmed)



https://twitter.com/baraou_anime/sta...60229154316292
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Old 2022-01-10, 01:20   Link #6
Guardian Enzo
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Nobody?

I quite enjoyed the premiere as a non-manga reader. It's J.C. Staff so expectations should be kept in check, but it really didn't look bad and the story was very engaging.
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Old 2022-01-10, 09:39   Link #7
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FYI: Funimation has the stream.

I'm going to have to get around to watching this. I've been waiting for it.
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Old 2022-01-10, 20:08   Link #8
SeijiSensei
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Joan of Arc was dead and buried in 1431 before Richard was born in 1452. I largely enjoyed this show, but I'm put off by silly anachronisms like this one.

Richard marries Anne Neville when he was 20.

I read Richard II way back when, but I've never read Richard III. Maybe I will. A single play doesn't take that log. Might read his Wiki page first, though, the "Cliff Notes" of the Internet age.

The wiki article ends with this piece of recent history:
Quote:
In 2012, an archaeological excavation was commissioned by the Richard III Society on the site previously occupied by Grey Friars Priory. The University of Leicester identified the skeleton found in the excavation as that of Richard III as a result of radiocarbon dating, comparison with contemporary reports of his appearance, and comparison of his mitochondrial DNA with that of two matrilineal descendants of his sister Anne. He was reburied in Leicester Cathedral on 26 March 2015.
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Old 2022-01-10, 20:39   Link #9
Guardian Enzo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeijiSensei View Post
Joan of Arc was dead and buried in 1431 before Richard was born in 1452. I largely enjoyed this show, but I'm put off by silly anachronisms like this one.

Richard marries Anne Neville when he was 20.

I read Richard II way back when, but I've never read Richard III. Maybe I will. A single play doesn't take that log. Might read his Wiki page first, though, the "Cliff Notes" of the Internet age.

The wiki article ends with this piece of recent history:
Well I mean, it’s not like he was a hermaphrodite either - poetic license I guess. It’s not like old Will didn’t take a few liberties in the name of poetic license when telling Dick’s story.

It’s animanga. Given the fanciful leaps we’ve seen with the likes of Nobunaga’s history, this seems pretty tame by comparison.
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Old 2022-01-10, 20:44   Link #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeijiSensei View Post
Joan of Arc was dead and buried in 1431 before Richard was born in 1452. I largely enjoyed this show, but I'm put off by silly anachronisms like this one.
I mean, my understanding is that is supposed to be Joan of Arc's ghost to begin with though?
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Old 2022-01-16, 19:44   Link #11
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Episode 2: I liked this, but boy is any animation basically non-existent (And the art wasn't nearly as pretty this time to make up for it).

On the plus side Sayaka Ohara hasn't chewed the scenery this much since Umineko no Naku Kori Ni's Beatrice.
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Old 2022-01-17, 15:29   Link #12
SeijiSensei
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Watched the first hour of Laurence Olivier's Richard III. The play starts with Richard as an adult, so is this show all prequel? Richard's not a very nice person in the Shakespeare play.
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Old 2022-01-17, 19:30   Link #13
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As a Shakespeare buff, this was deliciously painful. Shamelessly indulgent melodrama, where famous names and monumental characters cut loose and simply blare their feelings out, is a very guilty pleasure in this case.

Apart from Joan's ghost, and Richard's 'ill-fated birth' (posthumous Tudor propaganda) being interpreted as hermaphroditism, episode 1 has Richard closer to his historical age than Shakespeare, who aged him up to involve and develop his character through the three Henry VI plays prior to Richard III, involving Richard in the whole War of the Roses and its battles. Edward of Westminster would also have been about six, when the Duke of York was named Protector in 1460. Richard did supposedly know Anne Neville as a child, also - Richardians romanticise them a great deal, in reaction to Shakespeare's villainous seducer, though The White Queen perhaps gave a more balanced view (in that, at least).

A more serious change, not just to Richard's biography but British history, is that the Duke of York was killed at the battle of Wakefield, shortly after being named Protector for King Henry's lifetime, as shown, hence 'Richard of York gave battle in vain'. His son Edmund was also killed, and might possibly have been cut from Rose King entirely. It was the Duke's eldest son Edward who deposed Henry and made himself king. This change annoyed me, but the Duke will likely be knocked off before becoming 'Richard III', and the writer doubtless wanted to wring some more out of young Richard's daddy issues. It's a familiar interpretation of the Shakespeare plays that rejection by his mother originally twisted his heart, along with a need to gain his warrior father's approval through bloodshed, intensified by the Duke's sudden death on the brink of triumph.

Henry VI's longing to be free from kingship, both in Rose King and Shakespeare, is incongruous given his insistence on only passing the crown to York upon his death. The historical truth was that he was a powerless madman with no say in the matter, and it was the nobles who didn't want the Duke to depose the king (alluded to rather more clearly in Rose King). We can only imagine in Shakespeare that Henry believes it his duty to retain the crown, despite being unwilling and unable to govern. The pure-souled and positive romantic of Rose King is naturally quite different from the pathetic but guilty King Henry of Shakespeare, and works well in a highly romanticised retelling.

Catesby, Richard III's councillor during his reign, and henchman in the play, would also have been about ten in 1460, but his loyal support of the young Richard is touching. The anime itself shows a dark, surreal and atmospheric world, with historical appeal, and seems to have decent potential for doing rather well, unless something goes badly wrong.

Last edited by Ghostfriendly; 2022-01-18 at 03:38.
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Old 2022-01-18, 02:55   Link #14
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*rubs hands together* Ah yes, this was delicious.
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Old 2022-01-18, 03:00   Link #15
Guardian Enzo
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I’ve heard of minimalist animation, but this was minimal animation. So many still frames in a second episode is pretty worrying even for J.C. Staff.

Content-wise I still enjoyed it, but unless you know the history I have to think the series has to be pretty confusing with this sort of pacing.
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Old 2022-01-18, 16:59   Link #16
Ghostfriendly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guardian Enzo View Post
I’ve heard of minimalist animation, but this was minimal animation. So many still frames in a second episode is pretty worrying even for J.C. Staff.
You can tell it was adapted from a manga, though adaption should mean changing it to suit the screen. The framing of characters was a bit strange as well; the Duke and Richard seem to take up almost the whole screen whenever they appear, with atmospherically dark but very simply drawn backgrounds. These are meant to be larger than life characters but the impression is a bit unnatural. George and Warwick are almost pushed off to one side in their scenes, despite Warwick especially being an important character.

The distant shots of the Duchess as a slender, lonely figure within stony castle walls do imply her situation effectively.
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Old 2022-01-23, 15:45   Link #17
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This was better than the last episode, but things are still happening way too fast. It's like I'm watching the cliff notes version of the story.
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Old 2022-01-24, 19:41   Link #18
Ghostfriendly
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There's a lot more to happen; we're only up to act 2 of Henry VI p3. Ep 2 was even better; there really were too many still frames and faceless figures, but Richard's action scenes did a lot with a little. Tsun-tsun Prince Edward and dear cinnamon roll King Henry were great. The emotional power of Richard's scenes with his mother, Grey and Henry were great. His angst feels very well-founded in his inner and outer turmoil, evoking great sympathy.

Are the faceless figures something similar to Utena, which I think had similar stylised figures at various times? It certainly doesn't work as well here. The apparent historical liberty I alluded to in my last post seems to have been more a matter of presentation.

It was a good detail that Margaret did allow the Lancastrians to commit mass looting, which, along with going back on the agreement for York's line to inherit the crown, after his death cost them most of their support.

Margaret is one of the meatiest female roles in Shakespeare, and rather more sympathetic there, frustrated by her powerless position and the adorable but pathetic husband who can do nothing to protect it. She was not a woman to be trifled with, however, and excellently presented as such here. The handkerchief she gives York was originally soaked in his youngest son Edmund's blood, killed by Lord Clifford in revenge for his own father's death; although Edmund was historically York's second son, and, as predicted, has been written out here.

Margaret's 'William' is presumably William de la Pole, Duke of Sussex, her political mentor in Henry VI part 1, and generally presumed lover. He was exiled for having the Duke of Gloucester murdered, then decapitated by pirates as foretold in a demonic prophecy. Shakespeare really can be fun.
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Old 2022-02-23, 19:46   Link #19
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A pity there hasn't been more discussion of this show. I know there are problems with the animation; Margaret's audience with King Louis, with the king of France himself blank-faced, and Margaret's rotating blank face making it especially ridiculous, certainly wasn't good. The animators would do much better to imitate Nagatoro-san and at least give the side-characters mouths, despite the necessary animation.

Still, art is never make or break when we're dealing with a story. A story rooted in real history, and in real literature with immortal insight into human passions. Like Heike Story, this gives Rose King a weight and authenticity far above, say, Ranking of Kings, when Rose King's portrayal of historical human tragedy is set against the latter show's quaint ideals and artificial fantasies.

Anyway, it was lovely to see Richard getting on well with Anne; the poor kid needs to catch a break. Rejecting her through overhearing and misunderstanding was somewhat soapy, but still rooted in the real woes of arranged marriage. Richard's tsun-tsun bit with King Henry was charming as well.

Ironic that Prince Ed in ep 6 is only interested in Anne for getting closer to Richard, while Anne only has eyes for Richard and literally talks to him through poor Ed as if he's invisible. The war and rigid noble society make it almost impossible for characters to really know each other or share their lives, despite the strength of the feelings, making Richard's times with Henry and Anne very poignant. For example King Edward is blind to his queen's malice, and Prince Edward obliviously misgenders Richard as a woman ("I'm not gay, even a bit!"). Still, Prince Edward is much improved from The White Queen, in which he was raised by Margaret to be as brutal as she is, and essentially rapes Anne Neville on their wedding night.

The White Queen also shows the stillbirth of Isabelle's first child, during the storm-wracked crossing to France to meet with Warwick's new allies. Queen Elizabeth was depicted in that supposedly-realistic series as a witch, cursing her husband's enemies with storms. A very tiresome attempt to give medieval woman an agency they did not, in fact, possess, and a rather tiresome series full of backbiting mean girls nagging their husbands into doing foolish things for the sake of their male relatives. The only respectable woman of them was, as always, Margaret of Anjou, who sorted matters out with her own hands, and was tellingly demonised as an unwomanly monster for it. The hidden malice of Queen Elizabeth in Rose King, as well as the beleaguered innocence of Anne and Isabelle, make for simpler characters but far more respectable and sympathetic. Just as Shakespeare himself accomplished with his speeches of personal sorrow and vulnerability, rather thoughtlessly defiance and imaginary magical powers.

Interesting for Buckingham to mention that he himself could conceivably become king. He's supporting Richard for now, but if the former ideas comes up again, it could indicate:

Spoiler for Possibly spoiler:
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Old 2022-04-24, 01:32   Link #20
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This is still airing so it should be moved back to current.

I'm pleasantly surprised that's it's still continuing. I've been re-listening to Dan Jones' book Wars of the Roses, and it's always interesting to see how fictional works based on historical events decide to both adhere to and break away from reality.
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